Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Arizona Daily Sun Newspaper Archive: March 29, 1956 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Arizona Daily Sun

Location: Flagstaff, Arizona

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Arizona Daily Sun (Newspaper) - March 29, 1956, Flagstaff, Arizona                               SO THEY SAY I didn't like the ihow. Give me everybody's nwoejr LM Stafford, Los Amgtm tkeater cuUrr, (tdHMM who beW her tad fled with The.Home Evening Newspaper of Northern Arizona Vol. 10 No. 170 Price 7e FLAGSTAFF, ARIZONA Phones 21 27G 41 TODAY'S WEATHER Warmer, the Old Weatherman says. Most- ly clear today, tonight, and Friday. Signs ol spring: Mrs. Charles Fife reports her dvrart Iris have buds and are Kcttlng ready to bloom and the Shasta daisies arc coming up. Low toi'ijlit 20, high tomorrow 60. Thursday, March 29, 1956 SENATE TURNS DOWN 3-MEMBER LABOR UNIT Crews Pushing Reconnaissance Road Through To Dam Site State, County Units Working On Project 17 Miles Roughed In From, Coppermine State and Coconino county high- way departments are building a reconnaissance road from Copper mine Trading- Post to the Glen Canyon dam site oh the Colorado River. Work started early this week and has been progressing at the rate of about two miles a day. Distance from.. Coppermine to the dam site is about 25 miles. A rough but passable road has been built this week over about eight inlles. The remaining 17 or 18 miles will jo much slower because of the difficult terrain. Coppermine ii 25 miles north east of The Gap, which Is about 80 miles north' of Flagstaff. Road building crews have been tutor blade, truck and bulldozer this week, 'and Thursday a carry- all was being hauled in to speed the work. Angus district en- gineer for the state highway de- partment, and Ralph G. Barney, county engineer, are directing tb> Project. .The plan'oirigiiiated'-with Cooc- ninb county's board' of ritperviaon: Chairman ..Gordon McDowell, 'joe D.'. Ttssaw. 'Harold b. Hufi'er; .i iibtit IS milis .upstream 'Irani WarkJS bridge on Highway 88. .This week Cotintjr Engineer Bar- ney got within five miles of the dam .site, via jeep, and expects to 1 get ah .the 'way to" the site in an- other trip nrly next week. PurpOK of the reconnaissance road is to investigate the. terrain and study road building problems jn the atea. The county, and state will benefit 'greatly if the town- site for the -big dam construction job is located on the or Flag- ataf f lide of the river. If the town- lite is on UK other side, most of the business resulting from the 9421 million project would prob- ably be f onneled to Utah. Congress gave the big project, a part of the Upper Colorado River Basin plan, final approval Wed- nesday, and the measure has gone to President Elsenhower for signa- ture. Arizona will not- gain water or power from '-the but could benefit from money spent on con- struction. The dam site is in the northern part of Coconino county. Water Supply Loses 6.4' MMMH (voloits water supply suffered t (alien decline la.it week, city officials reported. Supply last Saturday waj gallons. The 'week before the supply wu gallons. For the corresponding; time a year ago the supply wu gallons. Upper Lake Vary declined from gallons to the lower lake lost from gallons to gallons; and reservoirs gained ilightly, gallons to gallons: Upper Lake Mary had 000 gallons. Last year this same the npper lake had gal- lorn, lower lake gallons, and roerrain PHOENIX ill Hancock Oil Co. Long Beach, Jwi obUined a for an oii'test well in Artaoaa. The win be made on the Na- vajo Indian RtiiervaUon, 'about eight aonthwesl of Hbmbk Ofl RetnUne Co.'s weU which the quantity fndDeer hi Uw.state. Hancock wW operate on icres mOer front the Nava- jn to Sfcen Oil Co, ONE-DAY SUN STAFF SMeiits   A spat involving adio communications flared Thursday between the Arizona iightt'.ny Pat ml and the Gila Coiin- sheriff's office. Greg O. Hath away, patrol supcr- titendent, said Uw sheriff's rndlu n Globe has refused to relay calls -om Phoenix headquarters to pa- olmcri in the area. Sheriff Jack Jones denied he has it the Highway Patrol off the air. "We're thinking about ho said. "We own the can lo whut we want to with it." Mciimvhile, the Highway Patrol i'a s m n king t cmpora i y arrange- ncnts by setting up a transmitter it Cbypool, near MiumL Hathaway said the sheriff 1oltl Tuesday tliat no move calls would be relayed to patrolmen. Jones said "heavy traffic" on the ictworit was the reason. Since then the patrol has beon jnable to get through, Hathaway -aid. T Jpnes reporter Thursday: state was maintaining our radio for us, but iibuut a I never out PHILADELPHIA A devas- tating explosion a four- story granary 'to fTaijiing rubble Wednesday night anil.: cut a 10- block-. swath of damage through Philadelphia's busy 30th and Mar- ket sts. section, The earth-rocking Wast shortly before p.m., left four listed misaing and feared dead with four, on the-critical list. Scores of oth- of them late evening hoppers headed home were treated for injuries of varying de- gree. Not until the cold morning air Williams OKs New Fire Rig (By the SUN's Own WILLIAMS The Town of Wil- liama has accepted delivery a new gallon per minute American La France fire engine, city officials have reported. With acceptance of-the new unit the fire department now has three truclut to furnish protection for the town. The new engine, to be known as No. 3. and an older ve- hicle, known as No. 2, will answer all alarms and Engine No. 1, a 1929 American La France, will be placed on a fesei-ve status. The Williams was organized in 1923, when the town purchased a Waterhous fire engine mounted on a Model T Ford Chassis, which was taken out of se'rvice The old en- gine was purchased by a private party and still under Its own power, making appearance in par- ades and celebrations here. cleared away palV. of black smoke was of the de- struction fully Revealed. As far as the eye could see there were broken window's, smashed automo- biles, debris. The scene of the explosion is two Wocks west, of the Schuylkill River that separates the downtown portion of Uie city from West Philadelphia. Across the street from the blast- ed milling plant of the Tidewater. Mill and Elevator new Philadelphia Bulletin four-story building took the full fury of the blast. The total damage promised to run a possible three mil I ions of dollars. Wilfred P. Button, gener- al superintendent the milling firm, said "ii rpIUion dollars might The explosion was felt 25 miles, away. Th e City Ha 11 switchboa rd reported an estimated 23.000 tele- phone calls were received in a four-hour period. The blamed by milling company's night su- perintendent on-collected dust. Samuel Purely said he was at- 150 Flog Frosh Tow County Offices Approximately 150 Flagstaff High School freshmen social sci- ence students completed tours Wednesday, and Thursday- of of- fices in Ihe Coconino county court- house- James L. Sanders, social science instructor, "said the" made by five different "classes, were a part of the study of county gov- ernment the classes have been having. Clark Home Nose Count Shows Young Families In Majority Children make up nearly half the 730 population of Clark Homes, a survey by the Flagstaff Housing Authority, the city agency that operates the project, has re- families are in the ma- jority at the project u well, the mrvey ihowed, as there are more under year of age than UMMC of all ages put togeth- er in the "11 years through 21- years The under-one year group count showed 5ft children, wkile the 11 through 21 group of 53. Uw groufi Crooi 1 to 19 yean of age the 36 three-year-olds had a lead of two over the two-year- olds and the four-year-olds. There were 2 five-year-oWs, 20 six-year- olds; 27 seven-year-olds, 29 eight- year-olds, 15 nine-year-olds, and 15 10-year-olds. Families living In the project's '91 apartments, totaled 18Sr as three apartments were being reno-, vated at the time of'the survey. The project now has 58 one bed- room 97 two bedroonr units; 27 of three bedrooms, and nine of four bedrooms. In the adult group, women out- numbered men 1W-1W, tempting to light a pilot light i a drying vat when the blast wa touched off. .The building collapae  sfiiy'pciHUiig- disposition of an ap- peal with the court here re cently. The appeal involves the denial of Thomas' petition for r writ of corpus by U.S. Dis trict Court in Phoenix- Judge Clamle MeColloch demc the request, in Phoenix following a study of the of the case MeColloch had jrrantcd Thomas a stay of his scheduled March 7 exe- cution pending the study. Judge Albeit Lee Stephens of the Circuit Court here ?aid the stay granted Wednesday will remain in effect until the current appeal is settled and "until further order o tho court." Thomas, a farm, was convicted of killing Mrs. Janie Mtskovich in.March of 1953 at the store she operated near WHlco.x. Businesses To Close NoM-3 p. m. Friday Most Flagstaff business houses will be closed from noon to 3 o'clock tomorrow afternoon to en able employees to attend Good Fri day aervlcfrs, the retail merchants committee of the Flagstaff Cham ber of Commerce has reported: Several churches will hold indi vidual and a union service is planned at the First BtpUit church. SPRING'S IN THE the spring, a young man's tancj turns to thoughts of love, and least this are no different. loft, got all slicked up at the Detroit, Mich., zoo to call on who also seems stricken with spring fever. Tarzari, with a.'.bouquct of gladioli behind oil back, li shown bowing to a gentlemanly invitation to dance. Glen Townsite Still Undecided r-- Locution bT the tileii Cany mi cUim construction "Due -to, remote location 'Bloodshot1 Eye Testimony Not Too Convincing OKLAHOMA CITY M u- nicipul Court James Dc- mopolos was subjected to an eye- popping1 experience Wednesday. "He staggered, his speech was incoherent and his eyes blood- a patrolman said in citing evidence against a defendant charged with drunk The defendant then insisted on a private c onfe rence wi th the judge. Tn the judge's chamber, the defendant disengaged a glass eye. "I Just want you to know that this glass eye is made with blood- shot Ktreaks, In it and that it wasn't my real1 he said1. The judge, a bit unnerved, post- poned a decision in the case. Union Merger Plans Get Committee OK PHOENIX Agreement on a merger of the Arizona State Fed- eration of Uibor (AFL) and the State Industrial .'Union Council (CIO) will be submitted to union members at tlicir conventions April 18. The executive committees of the two groups on the merger Wednesday night. If it is approved, the two organizations will hold a joint convention April 19. Son Monad Union Hearings Scheduled PHOENIX Lfl A hearing on pttiikms for bargaining elections submitted by seven unions seeking to represent about workers at the San Manuel Copper Corp. wilt be hold April 3 by the National Labor Relations Board. Good Friday Rites Planned f tin1- dani site, it xvill bo itcccs- itary to provide ns.il c f sic fur construction mid dpt-ra- Dexhemwr, the bdrrao, faTtl the Sen- rrported his Seven pastors wjH take part in the Union Good Friday Services at the First Baptist Church, 123 S, Beaver St., Friday. The three-hour HCivice will be from 12 to 3 p.m. The theme will be the seven last words of Christ on the cross. The seven pastors will deliver the meditations, with gpcciul music before each word. Those taking part are the Revs. J. (J. Garrison, J. P. Ireland, John Wiles, BaUnzar Garcia, Warren Barnett, T. A. Patterson, and Wy- bnrn Skitlmore.' The Rev. Paul Pugh, missionary from Uruguay, will interpret in English for the R.ev. Garcia, who will sjiciik in Spanish. Deover New SUN Circuktticn Manager Bill Deaver, Tor the past year sports wHter for the SUN. today assumed new. duties as circulation manager. He will continue to de- vote a part of his time to sports. He succeeds Alan Kinvig1 who has resigned his position lo dirrct his efforts to an advertising- eney. Dick Ford, Winslow student at the collegers working1 in the Iocs display advertising department under direction of Bill Mitchell, advertising manager, Mrs. June Clements recently as sumecl duties as classified manager. Mrs. Billie Yost, formerly society editor. Is comptroller. Miss Vir- ginia Schwartz is a new addition to the news department. Miss Marion Eowen is receptionist and proofreader. "The town -iway. somewha similar but p'robaoly not as exten sive as that provided at Coulde City, Nevada, for Hoover Dam. A we proceed with our final locatio surveys and designs for the dam anil facilities, we will have mot detailed he said. Dexheimer said the information he was providing for Senator. (JoM- watcr was coming- from the re- gional director aL Salt-Lake City. 'With regard to commencement of construction of Glen Canyon lam, we propose to expedite pre- construction. activities in-order to et construction contracts on .ic- ce.s.s roadSj towtisitej and works-to divert the river during- fiscal years 1957. On the assumption that funds will bo. made available for rapid work, we antici- pate the constntction of the dam will rcrruire a five to seven year period. 'The estimate of con- struction of tlie dam and power plant nniE appurtenant is approximately J287 million, exclu- sive of the cost of transmission facilities.'" 'roposal For Conference On Bill Rejected 5-Member Group Included In Senate Version PUOENMX ifl The bill mating i slate department of latsor ap- i.iitntly died on the Senate fluyr when the Senate refused concur in House amendments. Sen. Harold Giss (D Yi'ma) nerved that the Senate not concur n the Flouse chunger and that tlie ill be sent back to the House for urther consideration. Sen. Thomas Collins (D-Fima) lied to amend the motion Unit the Senate do concur but was voted I own 18 to 3. Sen. Zarlc Cook (D-Mohave) of- fered an amendment to the Giss :notion to send the bill to a con- ference committee but was voted down 16 to 10. The Senate and House ssed conflicting versions of Hie and the measure returned to the Senate by the House was an a11empt to compromise. Tn arguing "for his motion, Col- lins noted- thai Gov. Ernest W. Mc- Parlntul had apkod for a rlo. payment bill ..and llmt bolli p platforms supported such n partment.' Son. Clny Simer said the compromise bill was not oil that labor wanted but was "better tlian what we have at this time." Cook, arguing for his motion, said that if, a labor department was to he passed, it would drive to worked out by a conference committee. Gtss snid he not approves f sending a bill of ihc f the labor department measure a conference committee, "In the past one ainl a h.ilf 'ears, members of our conference ommittccs have been bruw-bcalcn and abused by members from the he said. "We've come out ccond best each time we've a till to conference. This bill is not -lead.- It can be returned to the loose and then can put it in a more acceptable form and send It lack." dc- Member German Royal Family Dies, Tucson TUCSON.W> Mrs. Sophie Amanda" Von Meyer-Hoy McGovney, a mc-mbor of the Ger- man royal house oT Hohenxollcrn and a relative of Kaiser Wilhclm, died Wednesday nipht at the age of 86. She Imd lived in Tucson since 1893. She was rchilcd on her mother's side to the Kaiser and to Alexander Von Humbolt, explorer and tliscrtv- the source of the Amazon River. Her husband, the late Howarc Wesley McGovney, once was a sheriff Tn the Dakota territory. SANTA FE RR CLOSING LAND DEPARTMENT ALBUQUERQUE The end of a business which once owned 14 million acres of land was an- nounced Th ursday by Sa ata Fe Railway. R. G. Rydin, vice president, Chi- cago, announced the railroad will be out of business sifter April 1. One of the last vestiges ol the old frontier fades into history with closing of railroad's land de- part here. In terminatmff the historic land department, Rydin ly plncH n for sale1' sign on acres in Arizona and acres in New'Mexico, They are nil that remains of nearly 14 million cicrea earned by com- pany Tn federal land grants. The Santa Fe's Jand department was established: in 1902 with head- quarters in Kan., and to Albuquerque in 1937. Prior to 1902 the enormous land administrative job Was supervised by the old- Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, forerunner of Santa wtiich purchased it in 1W7, The firviiit which the Atlantic 'and Pacific received in July, 3866. cu a diagonal swath across the terri tories ol New Mexico and Arizona Tn alternate sections like a check crboard, the land ranged in dis- tance up to 40 miles on either side of the railroad. The road was con strutted from Tslcla, N'.M.. a. tiny Indian village 13 .miles south 01 Albuquerque, to the Colorado Rivei at Needles, Calif. For the past quarter of a century SanU Fe haV retained all mlnera rights on land grant acreage it has Supai Issues To Be Heard Problems relating lo Uic supai Indians will be discussed at a meeting of the Arizona Commis- sion of Indian Affairs at the slulc supreme court chambers in. Phoe- nix Friday'ami Saturday. Sam Thomas, Sacaton. secretary, said that another matter scheduled Tor discussion is one relating- to the Phoenix Indian school. Thomus said that Indians have iisked for- conglderation of the fact that the .school's athletic teams would like to become eligible for competition with other schools in the regular conferences rather than In non- conference events and games. Dr. Schnur of Sedona, mem- ber of the Commission, is expect- ed to open the discussion of Hava- supal matters. Members of the Havasupai tribal council are sched- uled for an appearance before the Commission. 4Hi Reported hi Measles Epidemic DETROIT W A fourth death in epidemic was reported Wednesday by Dr. Joseph. G. 'Molncr. city commis- sioner of health. He said the latest victim was a 3-year-old boy. Detroit had 771 reported casci of measles in the last week, cort-' pared with 55 in the corresponatm; week a year ago. He laid caaes had in the city sinre-Jan. 3.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication