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Douglas Dispatch Newspaper Archive: October 13, 1971 - Page 1

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   Dispatch, The (Newspaper) - October 13, 1971, Douglas, Arizona                              Cochise County's ONLY Daily Newspaper Serving .Douglas-A'gua Pricta Bisbcc Siiiphm-Snrinjis Valley Douglas, Arizona, Wednesday Afternoon, OctnViiv 13, 1971 Vol. 69 No. 179 Cunts Pages Nixon To Attend Moscow Conference Auxiliary To Serve Hospital The Hospital Auxiliary Is organizing lo provide services to the County Hospital as a whole. Some of (he members are (left to right) Gerald Conlcy, administrator of llic hos- pital, Mrs. H. A. Brailshnw, prcsidcntof Hie niixilinry, Mrs. Sic! Mociir, vice-president, Mis. II, L. Smith, co-chairman of Ihe gift shop and not pictured arc Msr. John Kurricka, secre- tary, Mrs.-" A, n. Drown, treasurer and Airs. Ben Snurc chairman ot the gilt shop. The Board oT Directors 1ms nllo- catcil sonic funds to the auxiliary for organization. A gUL sliop will be established in the lobby of Ihe hospital. Volun- Iccrs will man the switchboard of the new telephone system and will also work in various oilier purls-of the (Photo by Ana WASHINGTON (AP) Pres- ident Nixon's announcement thai lie will attend a summit conference in Moscow noxl May should have come as no surprise, sny U.S. officials and foreign diplomats, "II is a logical extension oE the growing improvement in American-Russian dealings fcince Nixon took office." one diplomat said. "The only sur- prise is Ilia I so Few people were talking about the possibility." One of those -who did talk in advance about such a trip was Soviet Communist piirly Chair- man Leonid who U.S. sources say bad been dis- ciussmg n Nixon'visit wilh sev- eral people for- several But wliclher it should hneu a surprise, the lacl is thnl Nixon did many people off balance when he appeared unexpectedly at iho routine Tuesday morning news briefing anil saitt: "The iL'iirtors of thu United Stales ami the Soviet Union in their exchimscs during the past yen1.', have (ho! a meet- ing between them would be de- sirable once sufficient progress had Imcii made in utgotialions levels. "I'i Light the- rccciil ad- vances in bilateral anrl multila- teral negotiation.? involving the- two countries, it has been agreed tbat such a meeting will take plficc in Moscow in IJic lat- ter part of Muy 1074." leading of that ar- novmcamiMil. relenscd at the same time in Moscow, the P L- c s i d e n I told newsmen he hod agreed In the Moscow .summit because ol ''a possibility of making progress." ho declined to detail what areas will discussed vrilh the Soviet lenders, Nixon indicated the Lalks will cover arms control, the Mideast, a Kuroppan security conference and a balanced, mutual (rut in Con I HI I Kuropc, Nixon was in mil- lining the areas of profess he led to thft siimmll tall; agreement. "We have bad n IreaLy wilh rejrnn! to the seabcds. luvvu had one with regard to biologic- al weapons. We have had an agreement coming out of the SALT talks (slraLegic arms limitation talks) with rugiiul to the hotline and accidental and, o[ course, most iruparljj.nl of I think this is the item thai, for both us ami for them, led us to conclude tha1. now was llic time for a summit w e hfiv e h? d a n agreement on What made no dUlercncs in settling on a Moscow summit in IMay. tnc President, declared emphatically, was his plan tit visil mainland China before lhat month. "The he said, "arc in- dependent trips. We are Suing lo Pelting for the purpose ol1 discussing maUcr.s of biluleral concern there. And I bv go- lo DID Soviet Union icr Ihc purpose or mallei's tlint involve the United Slates and the Soviet Union "Any speculation to the effect Hut fine has been planned for ihe of nVfcctinii the oth- er would lio entirely in Congressional reaction was positive. "1 cannot see where anything but good can come from said House Speaker Car! Albert, D-Okb. Simihir stalenicn'-i came from Senate Rcpub'icaii Leader Scott and his generally colleague, Colora- do Republican Gordon Allolt, said he approves of (be trip. Nixon himself indicated he expects (jnocl from the summit, which will be Ins third visit to Llie Soviet Union. Nixon said h? luis constantly pninlcd out to the Russians and the American people'- "I did not believe summit would Fcrvc a useful purpose unless something was to come out of it. I do not believe in having summit meetings simply Cor the purpnsc (if inivinfi a mcot- ini" But regardless of hia hopes, the President emphasized in a Jnler statement mark1 at n ceri> mnny on Caoitol Mill Uiera will be no summit selllcmenl at Ihc expense of U.S. vital interests. "Unless and until we have mutual agreements the United States must maintain its dffeiHr- aL levels." The Nixon summit will be the fifth such conference since President Dtt-ighL D. Eisciy hower met with Russian offi- cials at Geneva in atlenilmt tlic next coufcreucr well, in lun in 1959. That was Followed three; years later when Prcsi- tfont John F. Kc-HiiecJy iuid So- viet leader Nikiin Klirushchcv met iu Vienna and a sum- mit at Crlasboro, N.J., between President Lyndon B. Johnson  nd Moratorium Throughout Country Many Issues Discussed By Douglas City Council City Council discus- sed demolishing unsafe houses ,'iml the problem of merchants displaying [heir wares in front nf their sloros at their mecl- night. Director of Planr.iug and Zoning Ray SianFord said thai he has .sent letters In the own- ers of the unsafe houses town but so far nothing IIHP been done. The Fire Chief Gerald Wickc, reported that ho had to rescue some stei'5 who in the floor of one of these Uist week. According to seeiion 2Q3D of Ihc Uniform Building Code, the fity has Ihc right to demolish these houses. The would be by the c i I y TITK Antiwar VSSOC'IATKD I'ltLSS lil (n Aldcrwoman ITCX brought Esther up n t i could tlcUvcr-a new truck In a year for with a trade-in on the olci truck. Action Fire LlqinpinPut of Tucson bid F.O.B. Doughis with a S-loOO.OO trade- in. Delivery would Ix: 220 days alter llic receipt rif tlip older. However the action bid did TioL have Hie required bid bond ail ached for per cent of the value of the contract. Therefore the- bid had In be thrown out. Action or. contract- ing for n now fiir truck u-a? deferred unlil week. The student body officers of Douglas High .School were pre- sent at last, niglit's meeting lo express n willinsjnca.s U> LOOP ernto will) the city goverumont in Us lous iiro.iect.s. Officers arft prcsidcr.t Corkcry, Vice-Pre.iidenl Gilbert Superior Court Judge. Lloyd C- Helm has ordered the ar- rcsL of Frank Floi-cs II, and Lor.nic Gibbons, botli of BIs- hcc. The bench warrant was is- sued Monday when Flovcs and Gibhons failed appear in coiirl. The ji iclgc also order- eel the bunding companies in- volved to show cause why the U Of A Orchestra To Have Concert The University of A r i 7. a n n Symphony Orchestra will make ils first vjsil Lo Cocliiae Cnl- Icse Ocloljer 17. The public is invited lo the concert, at 3 p.m. in the flymnasiuin. Henry Johnson will direct ihe group, wlih Jarcd Jacohsen the soloist in the fourth and final number of the clay follow- ing intermission. Tlie program anr.ouiiccd is: Academic Foslh'al Overture, Opus Brahms. Ch.iconnc (from Ihe Foiirl'i Sonata in d Minor for lirO J. S. Bach. Charade (World Prc Robert Sliiczynski. Concert Nn. 1 ir. B flat Min- or for Piano anil Orchestra. Opus I. Tschaikows- ky. Allegro non Iroppo c mil'.- (o maestoso, Anidantino s i m- Allegro eon fitoco. Organized mainly to provide symphonic music to the ram pus and commur.itic.s out the slate, the Uim'ersi'.y of Arizona orchestra has ser- ved as a for pi-escn- tation of student and faculty soloists. Another role has been presentation of original slumped over his itc.sk about (i Helm Orders Arrest Of Two Bisbee Men health problem of [be dninpyaTd-look Figneroii; Recording Hctlina R n i Cor Secretary lerchib Council oilier cUTenclar.ts in Llic Gibbojis and Mic'hac- Elkins. wore released on cns'i bond. All four ai-e clinrgcd will) coniribuling li> Llic dependency or dclirqnency uf three niin- In oiher action, llic judge: foi-reilurc of En thti case of Robert .Inincs Hunt, who was appealing con- pair failed to appear. Two viclion For a false bill of lad- r Solo Vi'i- X I f 1 Acheson buccumbs At Maryland Farm PiTas Writer WASHINGTON CAP) For- mer Secretary of Slate Achoson died Tuesday night, IfJ years after leaving the post r.c used to establish policies thai serve as the foundation for much of America's diplomatic .sli-iilesy of Hie Knre.ui nj.-. 
                            

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