Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Dothan Eagle Newspaper Archive: December 1, 1934 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Dothan Eagle

Location: Dothan, Alabama

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Dothan Eagle, The (Newspaper) - December 1, 1934, Dothan, Alabama                               Popnlitkm Dothmn THAN Heard Them 'Let Go To VOLUME 17. DOT TURDAY DECEMBER Dothan Spots MMdllBff Strict Middling..........1201 Strict Low Middling NUMBER 59. r 'f R aby i l- y r ri FAMILY FEUD MAY BE CLUE TO 5 DEATHS Far Says t __ Bnttar of Calif ormito Fond Slab Widi Ntee After DMliOfBabw HERO BURIALPREPARED FOR THREE YOUNGSTERS r Sisters of Elmo Noakes Draw Sentence In Recurrence Of Row At Probe Moves Dec. 1. A new clue to the mysterious deaths of Elmo his niece three in the cropped up family feud. trouble in the fam- said R. U. of in possible ex- planation of tbe migration across continent of the five lonely fig- and the tragedy befell Mountain Burial Place With Pennsylvania.police seeking to confirm a motive for the the foothills of the Blue Ridge ttountains where the three little gifia were miles from railroad shanty in which and his niece were shot to reckoned them back for- Th6 American Legion arranged burial of the children In a cir- cular spot of land set aside for in the rugged hills. The cere- mony was one usually reserved for the nation's hero dead. A crowd of more than 300 per- gathered at a funeral parlor in a drenching rain for the funeral. at the town market feouse were other buying week-end provisions without re- gard to the closing scene in the mountain tragedy that gripped the nation for days after the little bodies were found carefully tucked between blankets along a State highway patrolmen and Boy Scouts were on hand at the morgue to direct but appearances were that moat of automobiles had the market house rather than the morgue as their destination. JBven while the dead man's in offered his explanation of the the dissension in the family of the five victims came to the surface again. Women Draw Sentences Two sisters of Noakes were given in RosevIIle last night after Rusell brother of the 18-year-old Winifred them WUi disturbing the and hia Mrs. Pearl Pierce. 1 The aroused to an up- when the Justice of the peace sentenced the women to 90 days in was quieted when the sentences were suspended. The women were ordered not to at- tempt see Mrs. Pierce again during the 90 days of probation. Mrs. Winnie Chafftn and Mrs. Kate Gibby.said they had called on Mrs. Pierce to help establish Identification of dead girl in Identification of the dead man as ttoakes was established to the sat- isfaction of state police by United Statea Marine fingerprints. De- scriptions of the others tallied with those of his inece and three chil- dren. Police worked on the theory that the five deaths were auicide TOUNG NEGRO FUGITIVE HUNTED FOR MULTIPLE KILLING AND WOUNDING i. Ckrka county officers were comb- tog thia section today in a wide- spread search for Floyd 21 old who they said trent a an entire family of four ne- and seriously wounding three on ILL Dec. you can always re- ._ to two weddings and I once heard Lady Astor y. two things get the house .wrds tax on liquor tax on landed estates. Then oM lords really come to about the only time you can Pt our houses of in- wetted is to start talking about that dollar up into little big fellows we think you mean art wrong and we fc to play with gentie- to ybo with in 88 think you still playing it'ra calUd hangs your and n It's Just a printing all government t Dont tlam door M 10 Mother Arrested As Children Tell t Of Fiery Torture You Have as Muy Wor. ries As I Yon Sometimes Do Things Yot're Sorry For Af- Says Woman INDIAN Dec. 1. A 37-year-old mother waa held to- day by police who listened to tales if strange punishments which in- cluded burns on the arms and legs of a 10-year-old and a head wound on a 12 years of age. Mrs. Jean sat in a chair at police headquarters and told de- tectives that you are as nervous ami have aa many wor- ries aa I you sometimes do things you are sorry for after- Her and were cared for in Juve- nile Detention after the lit- tle girl had been treated in City Hospital for burns on th arms and the right leg which she said her mother inflctied with a curling iron. Bernlce said she ate a jar of mayonnaise because she was hun- and that when Mrs. Heitz dis- covered she hated the iron and drew it across the child's hands and arms and between the fingers. Joseph reluctantly admitted that a scar on his temple was the result of his attempt to escape while a stick was being twisted in his hair. Police arreoted Mrs. Heitz on a vagrancy charge yesterday and held her under bond after neighbors had lodged complaints. The woman said her husband has been dead several years and that she bought the children here from Chicago four years ago. JEALOUSY BLAMED IN BLOUNTSTOWN FAMILY SHOOTING f Ernest Ex-Jackson f Deputy In Hospital With Ballet In Thigh f Ernest Blounts- sawmill operator and a former Jackson county deputy sher- was in a Dothan hospital today with a bullet wound In his thigh. McCIellan was shot by his according to Deputy Sheriff J. Hollls. who described the motive as Mrs. McCIellan fired at her husband but one of the bullets Deputy HoHis said. The wounded declined to prosecute his wife in the which took place near the edge of the Blountstown city limits about 7 o'clock last according to Hol- Us. MRS. LELA MONEY PASSES FOLLOWING BRIEF BURIAL AT SHORTERVILLE Mrs. Lela of Shorter- route died in a Dothan hos- pital at 3 p. m. following an illness of four days. She was a member of the Union Primitive Baptist church and had been a resi- dent of that community all her life. She is survived by her Bud seven Robert of Shorterville route John and Loris Money of two Mrs. A. L. Aplin. Colum- bia route and Miss Ella Rea Shorterville route four Mrs. Carrie Abbeville route Mrs. Ella Sou- Ashford route Mrs. B. S. Hatfield. and Mrs. LilUe and four W. M. Clarence Col- umbia route Aubrey Culpep- and Walter Funeral was to be held at 2 p. m. today at the Union Baptist near with the Rev. Mr. pastor of the Abbeville Methodist officiating. Bur- ial was to follow in the church Fellows and Forrester in charge. VANDALISM USHER SECOND WEEK OF STRIKE LOS Dec. 1. Marked by vandal- ism and partial interruption of the Los Angeles Railway Company's strike today entered its second week with officials express- ing tbe hope the Jab or controversy soon would be ended. A mob of nearly men- and women was routed late yesterday at Seventh street and the city's busiest intersection when police fired a'barrage of tear gas. LAST RITES SUNDAY FOR JOHN J. ESPY 4 Alto V. McCbmny and P. Injured in the bead-on llsloo of two autmobiUs Thanks- gtring were wei at local hospitals today. John of Wlted In ths- will te burtod tomorrow Helps Conduct Saar Plebiscite f. SAKA1I WAMBAUGH A little-known American woman fills what probably is the most im- portant feminine job in current international affairs. She is Sa- rah Wambaugh of a member of the Interna- tional plebiscite commission named by the League of Nations to conduct the all-important elec- tion in the Saar on January 13. This is one of the rare pictures of her. FRANCE PRESENTS GERMANY OPENING TO WIN BACK SAAR Possible Decision Of League To Restore Territory Won't Be Opposed Dec. 1. Minister Pierre Laval today pub- licly offered to Germany a second chance to regain the Saar territory if the January 13 plebiscite favors remaining under League of Na- tions jurisdiction. 1. Pierrc-Etienne Flandin gained a sweeping victory today in the Chamber of being ac- corded a decisive vote of confi- dence on his demand for secret funds for the ministry of the In- The chamber voted confidence in Flandin's cabinet 457 to even more overwhelming than the vote by which the chamber expressed confidence in his cab- inet when it entered office. He told the chamber of deputies that. France was not opposed to a possible decision of the league council to give the Saar to Ger- many if after voting to continue unvler the league the Saarites later wish to return to Germany. Wants Socialist Deputy Leon bit- On Back MRS. EFFIE BATTLE FALLS INTO LONG REST AT HOME OF HER SON ON ROUTE 4 Mrs. Effie died at the home of her C. Do- than route yesterday afternoon following a short illness. Besides the son at whose home she Mrs. Battle is survived by eight other of Fla. J. Dothan route R. T.f Henry and H. Dothan route and Luedon Battle. two Mrs. Sallie Do- and Mrs. Mottle C. Do- than. Funeral was to be held at 3 p. m. toffey at the Smyrna church with the Rev. J. C. of and Fellows and For- rester in charge. SPECIAL MESSENGER TO LEAVE ADDRESSEE NOTICE OF MISSIVE Mrs. A. Y. M Dothan post- announced today that the special delivery messenger will leave a notice when he cannot find tbe addressee at the address desig- nated on special delhrery letters. The system is similar to the one used by telegraph tag left on the door or stuck un- derneath the door. After finding the tbe person for whom a letter is being many claim the missive at the postoffice. Should the letter remain un- claimed will be delivered to the address in the next regular mall. THBEE MBW MANCHUBIAK RAILROADS ABB PROJECTED TOKYO. Dee. L for three new Mancburian two of them strategically Important through carrying the Japanese controlled rail system closer to the Soviet were announced to- day by tbe Manchoukuo legation GANGLAND ARMS SEARCH LAUNCHED BY SENATE GROUP Anns fnqwrers Want To Know Where Thugi Get Cheap Machine Guns KILLING TO HAVE ECHO Pope Of Idaho Calls National Dec. 1 A spurt in the manufacture of cheap machine guns engaged the attention of Senate munitions in- vestigators today as they sought to learn -where gangdom gets its im- plements of war. Echoes of the shots that killed Federal Agents Samuel P. Cowley and Herman GUHs will be heard next week when the senatorial committee resumes its inquiry. Noting an increase in the out- put of sub-machine investi- gators believed many of them were manufactured piece by piece in small machine shops and then shipped to certain concerns in Brooklyn to be assembled. While representatives of larger and better known manufacturers have been subpoenaed to appear next none of them manu- factures the sub-machine gun fav- ored by desperadoes. But the com- mittee hopes to obtain from a lengthy list of witnesses some sug- gestions as to how the underworld gets arms and ammunition. In previous the arms companies have said they take strict precautions to keep their weapons from criminal hands. But somehow or Investigator Stephen Raushenbush the un- derworld has obtained at least 800 sub-machine guns. Expressing dissatisfaction with the explantion that criminals stole some from Law Senator Pope want to know if these guns are being sold and who is selling them. And we want to know what must be done to dry up the source of supplies. The ruthless killing of peace officers in this country amounts to a national dis- President Facing Momentous Decision On Future Relief Dole Or Work Splits Aides MARY PICKFORD HEATEDLY DENIES FORMER AGENT'S CHARGES OF MISCONDUCT Whether To Call For More Bil- lions Or Taper Off Expendi- tures Trusting In Business Re- vival Question Dec. i. With advisers pouring conflicting counsel into his President Roosevelt entered today the month in which he will make a decision regarded official Washington as one of the most momentous ever to face a chief executive. Whether to call on congress to appropriate more a gigantic effort to conquer the relief and unem- ployment or whether to taper off Federal expenditures in the belief that a business revival will do the is the ques- tion. Cabinet At Loggerheads It is an issue that sharply divides the the and sources the very cabinet itself. Two of the foremost advocates of the Secretary Harold L. Public Works and Harry L. Federal Emerg- ency Relief planned to thresh out their suggestions with the chief executive before the log fireplace at Warm Springs in con- ferences starting this week-end. Hopkins' plan for a Federal work relief with an appro- priation of to to abolish the in fa- vor of government-made Jobs and opportunities tis said to have di- vided the presidential advisers. The more wore tif scribed as leaning toward reduced Federal with greater empha sis on stimulating private possibly by government Insurance of loans to speed up the heavy in- dustries. Ickes Carries Plan who. like ex- presses little confMence In the abil- ity of private industry to solve the employment problem leaves tomorrow for Warm Springs with a plan to expand public works. Smiling Chief Tackles Problem IMtESIDKNT ROOSEVELT Though he was keeping tho figure a close usually well-Informed persons suggested that 000 to might be a. good as to what he has in mind Hopkins Will Press Ad- vocacy Of Spending For Re- habilitation Idea Upon Roose- velt at Coming Meeting for immediate program. Observers did not regard the Hopkins and Ickes plans aa a con- certed plan for a total appropria- tion of to but rather as two different approaches to the intertwined problems of recovery and relief. But there was no doubt In most minds that many business and banking leaders and other advo- cates of a taperlng-off process would be found in the opposing camp. The Federal Emergency Relief Admllnatration has collected sta- tistics to show that the number of people on relief of all kinds has grown from in Septem- to last Septem- ber. Moro than half were on direct officials call the dole. Among the FERA's these things bulk More relief where the unemployed make goods for the Farm Industry Planned Rural-industrial communities built with relief funds. In them Hopkins hopes to evolve a com- bination of industrial employment and subsistence farming to provide security for thousands of families now living In crowded More money for rehabilitation loans to the destitute. One quarter in whjch Hopkins counts on reducing Federal expend- itures in the future is the care of An increasing number of the states are being railed upon to resume their normal function of sheltering the aged and physically hanvllcappcd. Though Ickes Is not disclosing his PWA he has said he could use as much as In a single year for slum clearance and low-cost housing. He hinted that another couple of billion might be put to work quick- ly on rural electrification and the clmilnaton of grade crossings. Dec. 1 stopping here on her way to California today denied and the allegedly scandalous charges made by Edward her former manager and who is suing her for serv- ices I Conra PPOUJS Of denial of the ridiculous ami Courageous rlCCC UI she said with is needless. It is significant that the allegations were not made unti'J many years after my NEW YORK JURIST UPHOLDS SECTION 7-A OF NRA CODE who could refute them had In support of his had charged that he preserved her reputation during her early days in films. Judge Black Rules In Union Suit 25 ABOARD FOUNDERING LAKE FREIGHTER SAVED NEW Dec. 1 tion 7-A of the providing for collective bargaining between em- ployers and -was upheld unequivocally today by Supreme Court Justice William Harman Black In the prolonged dispute be- tween the Doll nnd Toy Workers union and the Ralph A. manufacturers of the Justice Black the contest- ants a woek in which to compose thfttr if did not court would Mich.f Dec. 1 Twenty-five members of the whaleback freighter Henry Cort's to n that the provisions of tho .Sec- crew reached shore safely this tjon are strictly enforced. 11 hours after the ship in Dittcord For Year struck the Muskegon harbor break- j Tho union and the company have water last night In a 60-mile gale. been in for over a PRESIDENT OF GLIDERS SOCIETY DIES IN CRASH MTAMT. Dec. 1. War- rrn E. Eaton of N. president of the Soaring Society of America anU a brother of Melvln C. Republican atate chair- man of New wan kllleH In- Blantly hero today in a glider croflh. Tho accident occurred while Eat- on nnd Pilot Harold alwo of were being towevi In t.wo gliders over the city by a plane containing Earl Sonthcc of Ath- who recently came here from N. where he had conducted a glider flchool. Some said Eaton's glider went Into a spin ami crashed shortly after it and the one piloted by Eowrn cut from tow. SWEEPING REFORM IN GOVERNMENTAL Making their way to the break- hand over on a line shot to the freighter by coast the sailors fought their way over a mile of the wave-lash- ed breakwater to shore. All were exhausted and suffer- ing from exposure. Some had to be assisted to apparently in- jured. The rescue of of them was considered an amazing feat in view of the high sea that was running and the tho plaintiff twion charging that the company tried to evade obligations of 7-A. the defendani protesting that the section bars the closed shop principle. the plaintiff ron- on page PARAGUAY HINGES PEACE OVERTURES OF BOLIVIAN HALT Asuncion Calls On New Govern. ment To Cease Hostilities In Chaco UPPER ATLANTIC COAST STORM WARNING ISSUED Dec. 1 The weather bureau today issued the following storm visory m. Southwest storm warnings displayed Delaware break- water to Maine. 9 a. m. Disturbance over New York and Middle Atlantic states moving east- ward will be attended by strong southerly winds and gales shifting to westerly and diminishing over south portion late this afternoon BR. HASKEW TO PREACH FINAL SERMON SUNDAY Dr. D. W. for two years the pastor of tho LaPgyette Street Methodist will preach his last sermons at 11 a. m. and at 7 p. m. tomorrow. The recent con- ference in Pensacola transfered Dr. Haskew to the Andalusia con- gregation and hfi will leave Tues- day to resume hii work there. By Dr. Haskew will preach Sunday morning 8 sermon on and Sunday Christian Rec. C. S. Talley will arrive in Dothan next Thursday with his family and will take charge of the LaFayette congregation for the en- Dec. The Paraguayan govern- ment today offered peace to Bolivia the new at. La Paz stops hostilities. Cbeercd by reports that the Bo- livian forces were retreating on all the ministry of drfense is- sued a communique calling on the government at La Paz to declaring shall haws faith in Paraguay- thinks should bo discontinued. an 1 BUDGET K SOUGHT Control Over Expenditures Advocat- ed By Civic Body Dec. I. Sweeping reforms In the govern- ment's budgetary will be advocated by the Chamber of Com- merce of the United States. Tho chamber announced this to- day after conducting a referendum In which HB irfembershlp approved 13 proposals to Improve the budget syfltem. One recommended was more active centralized adminlH- trative control of would he obtained by ening the executive allotment tem of funds BO as to Include all ordinary and emerg- ency strengthening it so to avoid the necessity of deficiency This recommendation for broad- er control by the administrative branch of the government aJso suggested that ex- penditures he reduced below ap- propriations. Among other proposals approved That the executive budget be sub- mitted to congress about March instead of early th iielief that estimates would be accurate if submitted nearer th of the fiscal That the Jn hia designate ad.ivities n That revenue estimates in the The warning was directed at I ccutive budget be BO expanded H-. Former Prfiftldent Jose Luis to present a complete revenue pro- Tejarta who took over the j gram. That there should be a general accounting office directly under control of the executive. and over north portion suing conference year. Dionne Girls Busy Making Records For Weight Gains of the Bolivian nation days ago. Meanwhile. General Estigarrihla. comrrmnder In chief of the Para- guayan aimpd two spear- heads of a double drive straight nt Dorbigny and advanced defenses of the Bolivian communications Villa Mon- tes. General1 Lanzi of Bolivia wan re- ported to be holding a force of 000 troops In reserve well to the North of the Paraguayan and there were indications t.hn.t AGREEMENT WILL HASTEN END OF SILK AND RAYON STRIKE FOR MEN r Ont. Dec. 1. The five Dionne who amazed the world by mailing a Joint ap- pearance into it six months and three days now engaged in es- tablishing weight raising records. Dr. A. R. the country phy- sician who brought them into the world and has supervised their care closely ever let it be known today that each of the quin- tuplets has practically quintupled her weight This amazing he pointed is to be compared with the fact that children ordinarily double their birth-weights by the end of tbeir first six months of life. for weighed ex- N. Dec. 1. The strike of silk dyers In Passalc valley mills nearesi its end today aa negotiators reached an was moving with cau- agreement. m order to prevent a surprise I Speedy ratification by shop chair- officially recorded seven nan'kjnR attrck. Paraguayan forces mc-n of the Federation of Silk and days after birth was two abamlonorf the advanced pout of I Fiayon Dyers and Finishers was 8 1-4 ounces. Her weight is Fort pjcUjDai consolidating their paving the way for the actly 12 pounds yesterday. Her BRITISH JOIN U. S. IN TERSE NOTE TO JAPS Objections To Manchokuoan Oil Monopoly Voiced In Conceit To Tokyo For Third Time In 5 Months By Powers JAPANESE OFFfCIALLY ADMIT PRESENTATIONS Vigorous Words Of Great Brit- Communique Believed Duplicated By U. S. tin's Dec. 1 Unit- ed States and Great Britain for the third time in five had conceitedly notified the anese government of their objec- tion to the Manchoukuo oil monop- oly In diplomatic representations It was officially admitted today that Sir Robert the Brltiah gave a note on the Bubject to Foreign Minister Kokl Hirola November although the United tSates embassy and the foreign office decttned to give out It was authoritatively learned that Ambassador Joseph Grew of the United States de- livered a similar note to the for- eign minister's residence this week end. With theso diplomatic the Anglo-American oil controversy against Japan was by ob- servers aa having entered a more ten HO stage. The British which was vig- orously reasserted Great Britain's contention that the mo- nopoly violates the treaty rights of the open-door principle of and Insisted that Japan cannot Es- cape responsibility for the actions of Manchoukuo. The content of the American note were not in view of the clear concert which it known to be maintained between London and as well as between the Brltlah and American embassies in Tokyo observers had strong reason to believe that it took a line similar to that of the British. Dev. 1 The possibility of a new trl-power ten- year naval treaty waa seen today us a result of new proposals by Japan. Ambassador Tsuneo Matsudairn of Japan told Norman H. the American representative to naval that Japan was tag to try to reach an understand- ing on the basis of recent British compromloe proposals. the British suggestion that Japan'fl fight to equality in theory only be granted and that equality In fact be withheld was flatly rejected by the Japanese. the new Japanese move brought little satisfaction to the delegates to the since It was made clear that Tok- yo insists on the abolition of the 5-5-3 which the United States and Great Britain are equally de- termined to maintain. All the Japanese are willing to it was stated. Is to try to reach an agreement if the British and Americans are prepared to concede full equality to Japan. GRADING Bros SOUGHT C. C. road supervisor of Houston county's highway de- today announced bids on the gracing of four acres of land at Cedar Ford -would be opened Mon- Letters announcing tbe open- Ing of th eblda have been sent to local firms. The cost of the Job expected to run around per according to McEachln. The Weather CLOUDV frost in South portion Sunday partly flllghUy warmer. Moder- ate variable winds on the coast TENN.r H lightly colder In extreme Eaet some- what warmer in extreme Southwest portion Sunday cloudy and rate Sunday night and In West and South in IN EXTREME NORTHWEST tempera- ture 32 to 36 degrees in Interior Sunday generally warmer. WEEKLY WEATHER OUTLOOK Central and East Gulf Bains in Eaat and Central portions at beginning and rain again within latter half of week. Cool first warmer and colder again at close. ly more than five times the original i positions into recording. Each of her sisters has Btralght Eaat of Dorblg-ny. made proportionate gains. Snows are not expected to block Dr. Dafoe'a daily visits to his charges this for 100 men are working on construction of a road from Caliander to the Dionne where the babies live in their own UNITED STATES TO KEEP WITH BOLIVIA WASHINGTON. 1. The United States plans to con- reopening of the mills on Monday. Signing of a two-year contract be- i tween employers and workers expected to follow ratification. The agreement reached today recognizes the federation SLS the collective bargaining agent for the workers. Mill owners are pledged tlnue diplomatic relations with j Malnrt Bunion livia Just as if there had been no Marie 9 Ibs. 8 Kmille 9 i change in the government private hospital. The quintuplets' latest 13 3-4 11 6 1-4 Annetts 11 11 Yvonne 121 that 2 Yvonne 12 2 oz. To- i change UU 54 Ibs.. oz. It wan said authoritatively today TTnifd States the entirely in accord I wtuTUM constitution. vacancy In a position held by union the owner will re- place the employe with another union member. 4 '-MJ.si I 7 f fl 1 V V I I I. i v r t c V 1. I r -V h 1 k .r j V y i --Y l f A v   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication