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Cullman Banner Newspaper Archive: October 22, 1937 - Page 1

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Publication: Cullman Banner

Location: Cullman, Alabama

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   Cullman Banner, The (Newspaper) - October 22, 1937, Cullman, Alabama                               We Believe In fcullmon'Sbunty In the Heart of Alabama's Rich- est Agricultural District YOUR NEWSPAPER Volume 15 CULLMAN, ALABAMA, 'OCTOBER 22, 1937. 5 Cents a Copy City Votes on Expansion Tuesday Cullman Proves To Be Only Alabama County To Desert P 1 V Lolumn 1ms Year -B.; P. in "County? 'Visitors from :met "-this question on every hand in Mont- in other coun- lties growing-Dry sentiment. for-Repeal m one -the first two tests popularity of Control Sys- 'tenvpolftigRl the'vote to! mean that the bone-dry lines were c'riirabling'throughout the state counties would follow Cullman's bolt to the liquor stares. But everything that has happen- ed 3ince-Sept 29 has indicated that the -bolt is in-ihe other direction. On the- same day, Calhoun Coun- fy rolled up an impressive Dry -majority to; be followed by even more surprising victories in Dale and-'Aulauga Counties. And this -week Talladega County Dry rose up and smote the Legalization Cause- between the eyes with a 700- Prize Offered THe r high school student x writing -'essay Bn "-''How -Nations May Avoid will-'recelve --a ie -enters his cflissertdtion ljbefbre line, November" 3rd. -N.: P.-'Bartlett, -special coordinator of '-'announced1- today- that- he wasj In-' Ex- press himself -en1 ttiis'-most ''-vital question. "I wlmf "esSayS- to1" cularly on' United- States may keep "'Out Bartlett explained, "but how any '-iatfon With -Aimistice- Day only ar short while away, and with l neutrality and" "war be'ihji-'discusSed in "every part of ting u-itiat -American youth should be" given an 'opportunity-" to' I Bartletfr declared. MrV See- how our -training "'and "against w'ar; is taking effect." Judges for the contest wiH -De se- RotSrjP Club, Mr. Bkrflett 'said, :and each essay will rieatfifesfc- 'find' 'oir Ideas clearly-expressed. Decatur to be Host To Legionnaires "The district meeting of the-Amer- ican Legion will be held October 27 in Decatur, at a" place to be' an- npunced later, District Command- er George" Kramer announced "to- day. _ are 12 posts in North Ala- bama, and everyone of them is pected to be well represented at the convention. Legionnaires the country over are noted for their revelry and good and the meet atJDecatur is expected to be rid different Cullman1 will be -well-represented on. the occasion, Mr. Kramer de- clared. f New Music Teacher RpV D7 Stames of feirnungham, graduate of the Birmingham Con- servatory, of Music, has recently come to Cullman and opened classes for those interested in mu- sic.. Mr. Stames has gained the praise of many .-Alabama musicians, par- ticularly of Prof- Dqrsejr WhiUing- ton, leader of .the Birmingham Civ- ic Symphony and of the Birming- ham Conservatory of Music. Don't Try This One Have you ever fallen from a three-story window? Probably not, for the chances are about a thousand to one that you would not be reading Ibis paper, if you had, but little Joan Leipert of SL putted ttre stunt and is here to talk. Joan 5s the daughter of Mrs Emma D. Leipert, who is visit- ing her father. J..O. Foshee of Cwliroajn, this week. Mrs. Lei- pert Joan slipped on a, cake ot Vaundry soap and fen pufelfoe window of her apart- ijnent; three floors from the street, landed on cellar door, which seems to have broken the fall sufficiently to bring Joan out without bone broken, too and burst into a awusatid pieces. Liquor Sales Level Off After Spirited Buying GORDON GIBBS ASSUMES MANAGERSHIP cruellest cut of all for the1 Repealists will probably come Novr 9, when Geneva County is ex- pected to return to the Dry column 'after a: brief experience with a liquor store. The county squeezed into" -the Wet column on March 10 'by- a whisker, and the result in nearby-Dale indicates that the Drys will' use their broadaxes when the next vote conies two weeks hence. '-Talla'dega County voted Dry by only797 votes on March 10, but this week's result gave the Drys more tWan 2000 voteru against a scant 1300 for the Repealists. ''-Montgomery observers who know Spe'aker Pro-Tern M. L. Robertson Have concluded that the Cullman result was probably something of at personal victory for the popular 'banker-legislator. ALABAMA FARM LEADERS t Id a Senate subcommittee in Montgomery this week that Ala- bama farmers want Federal crop control and they want it in a hurry. The subcommittee, headed by Senator Ed Smith, of South Caro- lina, is making a tour of the South- ern states sounding out sentiment among the farmers, trying to deter- mine what, if any, farm legisla- tion should be passed by the next Congress. An 11-member group, led by] Agriculture Commissioner Bob Goode and Extension Director P. O. Davis, represented Alabama agriculture at the hearing. They told the subcommittee that "con- solidated farm sentiment" in the favored compulsory crop con- trol on an acreage basis. THE 779th ALABAMA MINE FA- TALITY SINCE 1905 was registered this week in an explosion which rocked the depths of Woodward Iron Company's Mulga mine and left 33 men dead and one dying. The explosion occured near mid- night, four miles from the mine en- trance and about 230 feel below the surface. Rescurers who hastened to the scene found all the victims but one dead, all of them clutching their faces as men do to fight off flames and gas. The sole survivor of the blast died two days later without having regained consciousness. The explosion was in the bottom- most section of the mine, and had it ocurred nearer the top the death tola might have reached 400. Government investigators declar- ed that every possible precaution against such a disaster had been taken by the company, but thai Ilic blast had apparently been set off by a miner lighting a safety lamp with 3 match instead of with a safety lighter. The blast was the third to strike the Mulga mine since it was opened about 1905, but more than tons of coal have been mined there since the last explosion, which was in 1917. Remarkable technical advances have been made in the struggle to make mining a safer occupation. But the "human element" sfOl re- mains, and thus the shadow of fbe explosion stiD hangs over the who too underground. An average sale of worth of alcoholic beverages seemed cer- tain this week for Store 25 of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board in Cullman. Although sales for Saturdays have reached the it was generally agreed that the average daily sale would not exceed These sales represent transactions principally for whiskey; only a comparatively small amount of wines and champagnes have as yet been sold. Successr to I. Val Woods, who' resigned as manager of the store last week, was Gordon Gibbs who assumed the position of manager, Monday. Mr. Gibbs is confident that he can carry out the job ef- fectively. It was believed by most authori- ties that large sales at the store were due principally to the fact that there were as yet no retail li- quor dealers in the county to take trade from the state store. Arrests Are Few Arrests for drunkenness "in Cull- man and the county were not un- usual for this time of the year, law enforcement officers reported today. Meanwhile, beer sales continued to increase, and it was apparent that liquor sales were small in com- parison to the enormous volume of beer being drunk in CuUman. Talladega Remains Dry Unofficial returns from the refl erendum held Tuesday in Talla- dega county indicated that the pro- Rotary Speaker GEORGE KLIMES George Klimes, District Gover- nor of Rotary International, will formally present Rotary Club of Cullman with its Charter, Monday evening, October 25th. Mr. Klimes is a member and past-president of the Rotary Club of Birmingham, and was among the delegates rep- resenting Alabama Rotary Clubs at the summer convention of Rotary International, held at Nice, France. Rotary of Cullman To Receive Charter Monday, Oct. 25th The Rotary Club of Cullman, re- cently organized, will officially re- ceive its charter, Monday, October 25th, at a special banquet held at the First Christian Church of Cull- man. The Cullman Club is one of the youngest clubs in existence throughout the world, being Rotary Club number 4403. Rotary ed in almost every oonntry in the world, Germany being one excep- tion because of a gpeeial ruling by Heir Hitler, Which prohibits the existence of any fraternal or civic clubs. Invitations have been sent to nu- merous friends of CuUman Rotar- ians, and a special blanket invita- tion was presented to the Cullman Kiwanis Club at the regular meet- ing of Kiwanis Tuesday night. Al- so, members of Rotary Clubs in hibition laws would be retained, ery town in North Alabama have Drys were victorious in almost ev- ery box except those in the met- ropolitan area of Talladega. Tal- ladega joined Calhoun, Dale and Autauga counties all of which re- cently voted statutes. to retain the dry been sent special invitations. The Rotary Club of Decatur, Kiwanis State Convention to Meet In Tuscaloosa CULLMAN CLUB TO BE REPRESENTED Tuscaloosa will be host to the State Convention of Kiwanis Inter- national. Sunday, Monday arid Tuesday, October 24-26th, it -was announced by local Kiwanians this week. Special delegates to the conven- tion from the CuUman Club will 'be W. T. Newton and Harry O. Wise, although several other Kiwanians from Cullman are expected 4o at- tend. were elected at the Kiwanis lunch- eon Tuesday night Harry Wise was elected to succeed 'Finis -St John, Jr., as President of -the club; W. T. Newton was elected Vice- president and H. day Srtiiih was re-cflected Secretary ot the club. The program fuesday night was quite a surprise to KiWfenians pres- ent when they were entertained by the amazing feats of a magician Wm. R Griffin, President of Ro- tary of Cullman, was present to'de- liver a formal invitation'to CuHmari Kiwanians to attend the Rotary Charter banquet Mfldwfay, -Oet "25 which is the sponsor club of Rotary of Cullman, will conduct the pro- gram for the charter presentation banquet Visitors are particularly expected from clubs at Bessemer, Ensley, Birmingham, Decatur, Hartselle, Huntsville, Gadsden and Sheffield. George -Klimes, Governor of the Alabama Rotary District, of 'the1 Alabama Vinegar Company -of Bir- mingham, will deliver the presen- tation address and formally .present the 'Cullman Club with the -charter! issued from 3he 'Chicago 
                            

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