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Cullman Banner Newspaper Archive: August 13, 1937 - Page 1

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Publication: Cullman Banner

Location: Cullman, Alabama

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   Cullman Banner, The (Newspaper) - August 13, 1937, Cullman, Alabama                               We Believe In Cullman County THE CUL BANNER YOUR NEWSPAPER In the Heart of Alabama's Rich- est Agricultural District Volume 5 CULLMAN, ALABAMA, FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 1937 5 Cents a Copy Senator Black Named For Supreme Court Vacancy Southerners Plead For 10-Cent Loan As Cotton Prices Sag By William B. Huie The national spotlight focused on King Cotton this week as the South's great money crop staggered under blows delivered from widely scattered sections of the globe. Prices tumbled almost daily during the week and Southern Congres- sional leaders beat a tattoo to the White House steps with demands that the Administration take immediate action to peg the cotton price at not lower than 10 cents a pound. The heaviest blow was the announcement by the Department of Ag- riculture that the crop will proba-1--------------------------------------------- bly reach bales, an in- crease of bales over last vj VJ- WjWV v w year and 5 bales over 1935. Total acreage for this year is set at The indicated yield an acre for this year's crop is 223.3 pounds, the largest in history. The previous high of 223.1 pounds an acre was made in 1898. The probable yield in Texas alone this year will be bales, as compared with last year. Just prior to announcement of the estimate, October cotton. was selling for 10.84 cents on the New York Curb, but after the announce- ment the price broke immediately to 10.43, a decline of about a bale. In Washington it is generally be- lieved that the Government will take steps before Congress ad- journs, to guarantee 10 cents. On a 10-cent guarantee, Cullman County farmers can expect a price of from 10.5 to 11 cents during October and November. AN INTERESTING ANGLE dev- eloped when Southern senators who had recently defeated the Presi- dent's Supreme Court Plan, called at the White House to ask for price- fixing on the cotton crop. The President told them that while the Administration was will- ing to control the cotton price, it could not continue controlling prices unless given the authority to control production. It was the production control fea- ture of the Agricultural Adjust- ment Act, you remember, which caused the Supreme Court to scrap the Triple A. So at the next session of Congress, if not in the present one, you will probably see the spectacle of Southern senators vot- ing for a farm production control bill which the Supreme Court will promptly rule unconstitutional. It was to prevent such action by the court and to establish forever the right of the Government to con- trol production that Mr. Roosevelt wanted to pack the Court with six brand new justices. Thus, if production control is de- sirable, it may be necessary for Southern Democrats to sponsor a Constitutional amendment, giving the Federal Government this power which the present Court declares that it does not hsve. FOUR OTHER FACTORS on the foreign fronts affected the cotton price. One is the large-scale Sino- Japanese War which is developing in the Orient Japan is now our biggest custo- mer for raw cotton. The cotton as taken to the great textile mills at Osaka, and there, with coolie labor. it is made into clothing which is sold to the teeming millions of Chi- nese. This week, with their Chinese market temporarily shut off, many of the Osaka mills were forced to close and cancel their orders for American cotton. Thus, for tne farmers of Cullman county and the South, it will be far if Japan could complete a of all of China. HiUcr Four-Year-Plan Germany self-sustaining is Ine demand for also cutting into American cotton. German chemists are working constantly to improve Iheir technique in the manufacture of rayons from wood fibers. The other disturbing factors are the development of cotton planta- tions in Ethiopia by Mussolini's Italians, and the increasing acre- age in Brazil and Egypt BIG JIM FARLEY, America's No. 1 book salesman, was headlines this week. back in the The belief spread the Democratic National Committee Chairman is planning to quit politics and become head of Fierce-Arrow Motor Co., which- plans to begin manufacture of low- price cars in competition with Ford, Chrystler and General Motors. Big Jim has been dissatisfied for some time with his income of ap- proximately a year, and he wants to get into the big dough and become an economic royalist. His most recent financial coup has been to bring the Party out of the red through the sale of "Demo- cratic Convention Books" to the big corporations for the staggering fig- ure of each. The books are autographed by the President, and are sold by basis. Farley The more books any corporation buys, the more "good- will" it is supposed to store up on Capitol HilL Corporations are prevented by law from making direct contribu- tions to any political fund, and this method is Jim's clever little scheme to get around the law. Since Jim is so clever at evading the law, some Washington corres- pondents suggest that he should hire himself out to the payers and show big income tax them how to evade the income tax laws. If Farley turns down the Fierce- Arrow offer, you can bet that he will be a candidate for governor of New York next year, and for the Presidential nomination in 1940. IN THE MIDST OF. ALL THE LABOR STRIFE that America has seen, the Senate this week was ex- pected to pause and pay tribute to AN EDITORIAL THE COTTON CRISIS school children, for begin ringing on the COUNTY SCHOOLS OPEN AUGUST 23rd The "good ole summer time" with its swimming, fishing and vacation- ing, is almost over for a lot of Cull- man county school bells morning of Monday, Aug. 23rd in county high schools and junior high schools. Supt. of Education R. Moore announced this week that practical- ly every teaching position had been filled by capable instructors, and that from a teacher's point of view the coming year shows more prom- ise than any term for the past seven! years. Cullman county teachers are still behind with their salaries, but it is hoped that an increase in tax mon- ey will bring the budget to a near balance by the end of the coming term. Cullman county grammar schools will not be opened until Oct. 18th, Mr. Moore announced. The schools opening the 23rd with their principals are: Cullman County High School, John C. Lewis; Fairview High School, E. T. Orr; Holly Pond High Backner; -West Point High O. B. Hodges; Hance- ville High School, J. R. Edmond- son; Cold Springs High School, C. H. Burns: Joppa School, John M. King; Hulaco School, H. L. Tipton; Baileyton School, H. L. Haney; Sim- coe School, Forrest Patrick; Walter School, R. E. Glaze; Jones Chapel School, J. O. Hamner: Dowling School, J. M. Mauldin: Loga-? School Ray Brown; Arkadelphia School, Chas. D. Smith; Vinemonl School, L. C. Camp; White City School. Earl York: Garden School, Kermit Johnson; Good Hope School, D. E. Ryan; Welt: School, T. B. Hare. Local Boy To Attend German University Philip Hartung, Jr., son of a prominent Cullman druggist, plan? to leave the last of this month for Berlin, Germany, where he will study chemistry in either the Uni- the one man in the country who versity of Berlin or Munich. seems to have best solved the prob- lem of human relations between employer and employe. That man is George F, Johnson, 30-year-old manufacturer of shoes, and one of manilarians. the world's great hu- In the shoe factories at EndicoU. N. Y_ Mr. Johnson has made a great fortune, but there has never been a day of labor strike. Much of the profits has gone into schools, libraries, playgrounds and hospitals for the employes. fho Senate has been asked to coin a special 50-ccnl in Mr. John- son's honor. He explains his suc- cessful philisophy in this way: "Give a man a decent income and he will learn how to spend il de- cently: give him leisure a decent comnrunaty. and he will Seam how to employ his free lime." Williams, famous cura- tor of Chicago's FicJd Museum, re- turned from an expedition to the South American jungles this an important discovery, wild that he found a tree whose sap, when allowed to ferment, becomes a "luscious red wine." He Gypsy Hose Lee, most'famous of New York's burlesque strip- leasers, returned to Broadway this week looking like a Park Avenue debutante. Gypsy Rose, who gained her fame and fortune through Ihe gerille art of disrobing on the stage, has been to Hollywood and Hollywood has made a lady out of her. She will be seen in some forthcoming movie productions in which sfoe is fully clotbed and sports a Harvard ac- cent. Last year, while Philip was at Auburn, a letter was received from Paul Weisz, student in Berlin, who wished to come to America to study. He proposed an exchange plan whereby someone in Alabama would pay his expenses and in turn he would pay expenses of some Ala- bama student in Germany. This exchange is necessitated because Heir Hitler does not allow money to go out of Germany. The plan sounded interesting any to the Hartungs and they accepted the proposition. However, Paul Weisz has decided that he cannot come to America until 1938. Dr. Hartung says he doesn't know whether the exchange can be worked out or not Philip plans lo sail to Bremen. Germany, via Mobile and New York City. There he will visit CarJ Cull- man, a cousin of Dr. Hartung's who Jives in Bremen, before he enters school. To study in Germany. one ally needs to ha-e-c a full knowledge of the German language. Philip's grandparents were German bom. his father speaks fluent German, and he has a basic knowledge of the language after two years of study in college. AH letters coming from Germany arc carefully watched to prevent leakage of information regarding the government so Philip will have to confine his letters home to the beautiful and interesting scenery. German universities are especial- ly noted for their fine courses in chemistry, and with his study there, Philip plans to build for himself a worthwhile background in this sub- ject as well as in language. Study in Europe is an advantage to be desired by any student, and Cullman is particularly happy when one of her own sons is afforded such a singular opportunity. The ominous shadow of 8-cent cotton hangs over Cullman County and the" South this week, striking fear into the hearts of farmers who have toiled to produce the largest crop in a decade. With prices sliding hourly, a general uneasiness has seized upon all of us who depend directly and indirectly on cotton. The whole structure of recovery in the South is threatened. At this late'hour we have but one choice. That is to lift our eyes toward Washington and demand that the gentlemen who have destroyed our foreign trade and committed us to a program of artiflciala price-fixing employ Government credit to peg the price at 10 cents. Word from the capital is that there is much haggling over how this is to be done. The President is reported to be delaying action as a spite move against Southern senators who killed his Supreme Court Bill. And Southern Congressmen are retaliating by holding up the Wages-and-Hours Bill until something is done for cotton. There is no; time for argument. There is no time now for per- sonal feuds and-factional bickering. There is no time for long- term planning. This is an emergency of national proportions. A bill providing for 10-cent loans and a reasonable regulation of next year's crop should be passed immediately. Then, with 10-cent cotton and prosperity assured, we can begin long-term planning. We don't have to look far to find the reason for the present cotton crisis. In 1929 the world consumption of American-grown cotton was bales. Last year the world purchased and consumed little more than bales of American cotton. The consumption of American cotton outside the United States during the last 12 months has been the lowest in 30 years. The chief reason for this steady decline lies in the Great Tariff Wall whict threatens to become higher and higher around the United States. Foreign-made goods are unable to scale this wall, and how then can nations like Germany and Italy purchase American cotton when they can't sell us anything in return? They have reserves, and they can only buy from nations which will trade freely with them. And the present Black-Connery Bill proposes to increase these tariffs, increase the price of American-made goods, and force the pay these higher-prices while his markets are steadily cut down. Until those in charge of the Federal Government recognize these obvious facts, they can expect nothing else but to have to continue to subsidize the cotton farmer. When they are willing to tear down the walls and give the Southern farmer a fighting chance to regain his stolen foreign markets, then the Southern farmer can take care of himself. But on those points we can wait for settlement. What we must have now is sober, constructive action which will assure us 10-cent cotton. The farmers who have toiled and hoped and prayed must have a profit this year. President Nominates Alabamian For Van Devanter's Position. DANIEL MADE CONVENTION'S VICE-PRESIDENT Gordon Daniel, local business man, was elected vice-president of the Alabama Merchants Association which convened Aug. 4th and 6ih in Birmingham. Other Cullmanites attending the convention were Bert Mackenlepe, John Imbusch, Jessie Mayo, Her- man Lee and Mr. Thomason. Mr. Daniel has been associated with the grocery and produce busi- ness for years in Cullman. but only .since 1932, when he became a parl- jner in the Copeland Daniel firm. Driving hailstones as large as hens' eggs struck Cullman County ne go jn business for himself. GIANT HAILSTONES SMASH ROOFS AND BREAK WINDOWS President Roosevelt today nominated Senator Hugo LaFayette Black to the Sup- reme Court of the United States. In a surprise move which startled the na- tion, the President sent the name of the fa- mous liberal Alabamian to the Senate at 11 a. m. today and asked that he be confirmed for the place recently vacated by Justice Wil- lis Van Devanter. Black's name was presented to the Sen- ate by Democratic Majority Leader Alben W. Barkley, who told newspapermen that he ex- pected little opposition to develop to the Ala- bamian's confirmation. If Senator Black ascends the High Court, it will mark the first time in the nation's histo- ry that an Alabamian has held such a posi- tion. The nomination came after Senator Black had successfully sponsored the Black- Connery Wages-and-hours Bill through the Senate. Battle Ground this week and brought almost complete destruction to six square'miles of rich farm lands. The icy storm, said to have been one of the most severe in the coun- try's history, lasted for a full hour and 10 minutes. Cotton stalks, with bolls ready to open, were stripped and beaten down, and shucks were rip- ped from full-grown ears of corn. The hailstorm broke at the Blair settlement near Battle Ground about 5 p. m. Tuesday and 25 farm- ers and their families were .forced to stand in their houses and watch cotton which promised to yield a bale to the acre beaten into the Frame Up? The Banner certainly took the money at a local theater this week. When the drawings were made, Mrs. Ruth Lowery, Banner linotype operator, look the lop prize of Later in the Ihird drawing. Mrs Jake Ceravolo. whose husband is foreman of The Banner shop, won HURSTON SALES MOVES TO NEW LOCATION Hurston Sales Company, dealers an electric appliances of ali kinds. have moved their entire business from its location 
                            

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