Athens News Courier, November 24, 2009

Athens News Courier

November 24, 2009

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Issue date: Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Pages available: 28

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Publication name: Athens News Courier

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Athens News Courier (Newspaper) - November 24, 2009, Athens, Alabama Iron Bowl football preview PAGE B1The News CourierServing Athens and Limestone County: A Community of Tradition and Future 50 centsTuesday, November 24, 2009 Visit us online www^rMwscourierxom Inside Today Astronauts take spacewalk PAGE 6A Wes Brown earns SEC defensive honor SPORTS, PAGE B1 Subscribe Get the news \\ith your morning coil'ee SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWS COURIER BY CALLING 232-2720 Index Classifieds.......4B Comics..........3B Ledger..........5A Obituaries.......2 A Henry Nichols Margaret Stokes Geneva Swinea Sports...........lb /    69847'OOOÜI    '    6 n.nv'[ ,(t’T a)’ am    >1 tunlm?. uv ms ;iji < > v ■.». ND»A It » (ypii^ isdSlar. I'M lovtt № run. ciinti. tua*, pit, m m« dirt, tna ■anve" stasyit i»wn no*tr His (»vorii» n snow 1« saaur-'* soaat ana n* adarst Eihm. i-M it «»fy sirong-tmUtd and nas ftaan Known n mrow a lanvum Of n»o' H» nas aiwayt oaan on iract wm rrary atpaci 0* nit a«v«iopn*ni unai m* Momnmg of Novwmetr I nokccd nai na actiuiraa a tiro an rut ngnr » a* Se»»rti aayt latar Jonn manbaneo mat Noah nao tioooad mnmna whan na chasaa run around tn* nauta At w# noucaa rtoan oatormnj mare unttabia raüms more oten »no wam.na mia wailt/doort- worry eaaan la sat in On Monday ' '..I'S I laek him lo hit pedtaifieiah, tutpaama he has an ear infection whichi could potvDiy anpiam hit prooiarvt Tnara was na inlkctian to *a wtia laid to coma dacx in a weeK it tha prooiemt peitisttd That Thursdsy I watchad nun play mnth childian ta>aiai months hit junior and my naan bagan ic oraat He woutd woowt around »a room mth rut »y«t sat on a pan.cuiar toy. out bafara na touio raath it anotnar ciiiio would run and icoop it up Tna frutteraboh m nit «'yet wat anoujn ter me to reaiue torMlhing watnT nght I tcnaduied an «sgayHnani win nit doctor far ma next day Fnaay 'This will be the worst day or bur lives, and it will be the best.' - JOHN DAVID CROWE Above, the Web site    ...... http://prayfornoah.weebly.com created by    ovrtesv    photo the Crowe family outlines Noah's progress. Below right, Noah loves "driving" dad's lawn mower tractor, John David Crowe said. Noah undergoes surgery at 7:15 this morning to remove a brain tumor. Community rallies as toddler undergoes brain surgery today By Kklly Kazek k( ‘IlyiP a t licnsiww’s -(on tier, cxmi Noah Crowe likes Elmo and dirt. He’s a toddler; it’s his job. In a toss-up, Elmo would likely win. The 21-month-old Noah loves watching “Sesame Street,’’ said his dad John David Crowe. But this weekend Noah watched television from a bed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Birmingham Children’s Hospital. And today, he will undergo surgery to remove a tumor from his brain that grew so quickly, his brain has swelled and put pressure on his brain stem. John David and Noah’s mom Jessica are in Birmingham at their son’s side, so How to help Updates on Noah's condition are being posted to the Web site http://pra^ornoah.weebly.com. A fund has been set up to help with the Crowe family's expenses. Visit any Compass Bank across North Alabama and look under the names Jessica or Noah Crowe to make donations. they set up the Web site http://prayfornoah.weebly.com/ to keep friends and family informed of his progress. John David is music minister, as well as college and group pastor, at Friendship United Methodist Church. See Noah, page 2A Grand, junior marshals named for Reliance Bank Christmas parade Carl Hunt has been selected the Reliance Bank Christmas Parade Grand Marshal and Emily Watson is the Honorary Grand Marshal. Emily is a fifth-grader at Athens Bible School. She won the Reliance Bank theme contest for the parade. The chosen theme is “A Nostalgic Christmas,” v^ch was chosen from entries submitted by Limestone County, Athens City, and Heritage Elementary schools. Hunt loves Athens and Limestone County and has spent the last 26 years living and working in Athens with his wife, Lacey, and daughters, Elizabeth and Catherine. “My three women are the inspiration and loves of my life,” said Hunt Hunt’s parents, Grace and Bill Hunt, brother David Hunt, 'to’" ^ Carl Hunt and sister Carole Foret will celebrate 41 years in Athens this Christmas. Carole’s twin sister, Claire, lived in Athens many years before moving to the Minneapolis, Minn., area. “Athens and Limestone County is truly home,” said Hunt. “Dad bought 32 plots at Roselawn Cemetery a few years ago, so we’re planning to be here Emily Watson awhile.” After graduating frxrm The University of Alabama and marrying, Hunt joined his frither in business at Limestone Health Facility. In 1989, Hunt and Alston Noah started The Pinnacle Group and sold the firm to CSC in 1997. See Parade, page 3A Council expands ordinance Preservation commission adds amendment By KaRKN MlDDLKTON kart'mi^Mhcnsncws-courit'r.coin The Athens City Council passed an amendment to the Historic Preservation Commission ordinance that would allow the city to name structures for designation to the National Register. But the measure did not go off without a hitch. Councilmen Harold Wales and Jimmy Gill voted against the amended ordinance, saying they were acting in accordance with the public’s wishes. Councilwomen Milly Caudle and Mignon Bowers voted for it, as did Council President Ronnie Marks. The amendment would allow the city to become a Certified luocal Government, which could propose an “inventory” of buildings to be added to the National Register of Historic Places. Such a designation, although the building in question might not be located in a historic district, would possibly help the owners of the building apply for a historic preservation grant. “This doesn’t say that we have to become a CLG, but if we want to sometime in the future, we can,” said Mack Martin, of the Public Works Departments. “Owners of the Pinnacle Group building got a grant because they got put on the National Register.” Caudle said the amendment could affect the designation of new historic districts, but it’s “not likely” that the city would seek formation of a new district. The city now has three historic districts: Robert Beaty, Houston, and Athens College. “I’m not saying I disagree with the ordinance, but I can’t support it,” said Wales when it came time to vote. “People are uneasy about it and asked me not to support it.” During discussion of the measure, Gill said he had questions. He said he believes historic ordinances are too restrictive on residents. However, Marks told him that many of the restrictive rules have been eliminated, such as those pertaining to See Council, page 2A Former jail good source of riprap By Karkn Middle i on kHraMatlu'nsnvws-couricr.coni The old Limestone County jail is the gift that just keeps on giving. Late last week the county hauled out some 70, 14-ton truckloads of the debris suitable for fill or riprap material and another five truckloads Monday, according to Brent Blackmon of MC Contracting that has been demolishing the old jail in recent weeks. “We try to utilize everything that can be converted back into something useful,” said Blackmon. “The pneumatic hammers we use have to bust the concrete up anyway. We typically contact the county or city governments we’re working for and explain what we have as an end product and they gener-aUy want to utilize it in some way. It helps us and it helps them. “We recycle quite a hit oi the steel out. We load it at no cost to them. We provide the material and they provide the trucks and it works well for both of us.” Blackmon said he hopes to finish the demolition job Wednesday. “We’re in the final processes now,” he said. “We have one vertical cut to See Riprap, page 2A ;

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