Athens News Courier, September 28, 2005

Athens News Courier

September 28, 2005

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Issue date: Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Pages available: 56

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Publication name: Athens News Courier

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Athens News Courier (Newspaper) - September 28, 2005, Athens, Alabama After the stormLocal woman tapped by FEMA to help in Mississippi    ic Friend now foe Tigers’ No. 1 running back prepares to face former teammates    IB The News-Co Serving Athens and Limestone County: A Community of Tradition and Future\V EDNEi^DAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2005 eiievvscoiiner.coni Mary Christopher of Athens Subscriber of the day Guest conductor Former Athens High School Band Director Dan Havely will guest conduct when the University of Alabama Million Dollar Band performs the National Anthem at the Alabama-Florida football game Saturday in Tuscaloosa. 5A Hey, Sound Off: Please! Leave Hine Street as is. What a discredit to Mr. Mine’s family. The man did actually live here, work here, worship here, paid taxes here and supported his town in civic duties. Not only did he give the land for a street for people to reside but also for us to ride on. Wonder if the shoe was on the other fool, how the King family would feel. After all, Dr. King does have significant recognition in many towns. What about Lincoln-Bridgeforth-King Drive at Lincoln-Bridgeforth Park? More Sound Off Valley, 5A Index Classified 4-8B Comics..........3B Headlines........4A Health ..........8A Ledger..........6A Obituaries 2A Erma Lee Blakely James Chambers Mary Frances Harber Maria Elizabeth Swaner Lowell R. Williams Sports.........1-2B Valley ..........5A Weather.........2A Daily Bible Moment or we will destroy this place, because the cry' of them Is waxen great before the face of the Lord; and the Lord hath sent us to destroy It. o •fWt (V»" Genesis 19:13 ((Ánjx'l 322HHV.-M\*.\lh«ns 256-232-1051 Obil lint 256-771-0034 6984700001GM to take over Delphi? Analyst: GM may take Dack Limestone plant By Sonny Turner [email protected] com Limestone County’s Delphi plant could be one that General Motors decides to take back if Delphi files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, a senior automobile analyst told The News-Courier Tuesday. “My position has been that Delphi will go Chapter 11,” said Erich Merkle, a senior analyst at IRN Inc., a Grand Rapids,Mich.-based automotive consulting firm. “But if GM comes to help out, most of the plants they will take back will be older line auto operations and I think you (Limestone) will fit in that category.” Merkle said if that happens, it is anybody’s guess what GM will do with the plants. He said GM could be “looking for a buyer.” The Limestone County Delphi complex employs approximately 2,500 workers and to have GM take back the plant would be welcome news to those employees. “We want GM to take us back.” said one employee Tuesday. “If they take us back, we’re thinking everything might work out.” Merkle said Delphi is expected to file for bankruptcy before Oct. 17 and he said if that happens and if GM decides not to take back the Limestone County plant, “it will not be a good scenario. “If they file for Chapter 11, you could see them cutting salaries, benefits and start closing some plants,” he added. “But the way I see it, GM is going to take back some of those older line auto operations, those that came very unprofitable for Delphi,” Merkle said. “It would be less expensive for them to take back those plants than to let See Delphi, Page 3A Deputy assaulted after theft New s-Courier Kim Rynders Konia Smith tells how a man broke Into her home Tuesday with her inside. Deputy Ron Crouch responded to Smith’s 911 call and later apprehended the suspect who fought with the officer while the officer was attempting to arrest him. Man arrested after incident Bn Sonnn Ti rner sonnytayithensnews-courier.com All available law enforcement officers in Athens and Limestone County responded to a “deputy down” call Tuesday afternoon which ended with the officer escaping injury during a fight w'ith a man who he was attempting to arrest for burglary. “Deputy Ron Crouch responded to a 911 call at this residence on Neeley Road and he later found the suspect down the road.” said Limestone Chief Investigator Stanley McNatt. “That’s when he got into a scuttle with the suspect. He was able to subdue him and he was not injured. The suspect has been taken to jail.” Jimmy Lawson Bryant, 21, of Neeley Road, Athens, is charged w ith second-degree burglary, second-degree assault, and resisting arrest He remained in the Limestone County Detention Center without bond Tuesday night. See Arrest, Page 3A New vote approves Madison hospital After initial vote overturned, SHCC once again green ights proposa Bn Sown Ti rner sonnv<a athensucws-couricKcom M<)NT(lOM^R^ Dc'ipite pleas from local officials who have warned a new hospital could kill .\thens-Limestone Hospital, the Statewide Health Coordinating Council voted 19-7 Tuesday approv ing application of a new 60-bed hospital in Madison. ■‘They did approve it. but there's whole new process they must go through and that could take years.” said .Vthens-l.imestone Hospital CFO Phil Dotson. "That process is the certificate of need process that will go before a nine-member state board and in that process, Huntsv ille Hospital, t restwood and others will file and they will contest one another. W’e also planned to contest. There are still quite a few more obstacles in the wav." Hospital officials were accompanied by Limestone County Commission Chairman Dav id Seibert and other city and county ofti-cials. Seibert told the board that he feared a new hospital in nearby Madison vvoukl "sign a death note" for ,‘\thcns-I.imestone Hospital. 1 he state board voted 14-4 in early .April to allow Madison the hospital, but that vote was See Hospital, Page 3A ‘Controversiar writer Chris Caitcher, bannec in county, visits AMS Bn Charloi I E Fi lion chaHotte(gyithensne\\'s-couneKcom “There’s no magic in therapy,” says author Chris Crutcher, "but the closest thing to magic is connection -that feeling of‘I’m not alone.’” Crutcher believes adolescents often find that connection in literature. Crutcher, who was in Athens on Tuesday to talk to students at Athens Middle School about the writing process, said later in an interview with The News-Courier that his most gratifying experiences have been those times when a young reader makes a personal connection to a situation in one of his books. As a teacher in alternative school and later as a therapist working w'ith young victims of abuse and neglect, he has spent a quarter of a century helping young people deal with the same problems confronted by characters in the books he writes. “When young people get drawn into a book because they find a character like them and adults decide that book isn’t worthy of reading, they take it personally,” he says. Crutcher’s book, "Whale Talk,” was banned from Limestone County Schools this year by a 4-3 vote of the Limestone County Board of Education, and this week his scheduled visit to C'lements High School - for what Crutcher says was to be a (j-rated assembly about what it means to be a writer was canceled. “Whale Talk” has the most profound message - especially for this area of the country,” says Rita Peterson, a retired teacher of English and journalism who was at AMS See Writer, Page 3A News-Courier .Alissa Clark Above, Athens Middle School teachers Linda McClary, left, and Kim Bailey flank author Chris Crutcher, who went to lunch at Dub’s Burgers with a student group. Crutcher was at the school earlier to talk to students about writing. At left, students created a poster that says “Read my lips, read banned books” in honor of Crutcher’s visit. The Limestone County Board of Education banned Crutcher’s book "Whale Talk.” ;

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