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Athens News Courier Newspaper Archive: November 7, 1968 - Page 1

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   Athens News Courier (Newspaper) - November 7, 1968, Athens, Alabama                                 3WS  Courier  Single  Copy  5*  VOLUME 86  'Successor To - The Alabama Courier (1880), Limestone Democrat (1891) and the News Leader (1965)  PUBLISHED TWICE EACH WEEK - TUESDAY AND THURSDAY  ATHENS, ALABAMA - THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1968  NUMBER 10  Nixon And Agnew Declared Winners  Over 200,000 Bushels Of Soybeans Are Sold  More tluui 200,000 bushels of soybeans have been sold at buying stations in Athens and Elkmont, according to Limestone County Extension ' Cliairinan F.K. Agee.  UGF Report Breakfast Set Friday  Macon Brock, chairman of the 1969 UGF Fund Drive, announces that the next UGF Report Breakfast will be at the Jil-Mar Restaurant at 7 a.m. Friday, Nov. 8.  Every worker is urged by ilrock to make a special effort to attend this meeting and he prepared to give a report on the following items: number of prospects assigned to you; number of prospects contacted; and amount of money collected or pledged.  Division leaders are asked to contact the workers in their divisions on Thursday «‘and then let us know how many reservations to make for breakfast,” he stated.  Persons who have not been contacted and would like to give should do so by mailing a contribution or pledge to the UGF, P. O. Box 150, Athens.  Figures for a smaller buying station in Belle Mina and larger buying station in Decatur were unavailable immediately.  Agee said, ”We are just getting into the soybean harvesting gmxl now.”  There are 24,000 acres of soybeans in Limestone County, compared with 19,000 acres last year and 7,500 acres in 1966.  Agee said soybean yields he has received information about have ranged from 10 to 40 bushels per acre.  He pointed out that Lime-stong County has a 509,000-  Youth Forum Is Scheduled  At Cal-Tech  Dr. James D. Bales, professor of Christian doctrine and lecturer on Christianity and communism at Harding College in Searcy, Ark., will be the featured speaker at a Youth Forum at John C. Calhoun State Technical Junior College at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8.  Thi.> is not an officiid school function although arrangements were made bv mem'œrs of tlie Church of Christ on the CalTech faculty.  W. S. Thompson, Cal-Tech faculty memlier who helped arrange the event, said the program is “for the benefit of students and the public who would like to attend.” The session will l>e in the Albert P. Brewer Library.  Dr. Bales will present a lecture entitle<l “Man On All Fours.”  He received a Ph.D from the (SEE PAGE TvVU)  Two Damage Suits Filed  Two damage suits totaling $30,000 have been filed in Limestone County Circuit Court against Butler Furniture Co., a corporation; Arthur Lee Butler, individually; and Jane Butler, individually.  A $25,000 suit was filed by Michael Douglas Owens, 5, who is suing by his father Gerald Owens, and a $5,000 suit was filed by Gerald and Mildred Owens as a result of tlie youth's injuries he allegedly incurred in the store on June 20, 1968.  The complaints contend that a fan fell from a window and hit the boy, who was four yeai’s old at the time, on the forehead.  The child was standing on his knees on a couch when the incident occurred, the complaint stated.  bushel storing capacity plus three buying stations.  Agee commented, “These buying stations and storage facilities have made it possible for us to grow a lot of soybeans.”  Limestone has become one of the top soybean producing counties in the state.  In reprd to other crops, Agee said cotton is expected to yield about a bale per acre on the 34,000 acres in Limestone this year. The average last year was 84 pounds of lint cotton per acre.  Early corn this year was badly hurt by the drought. This year's crop is expected to average about 30 bushels per acre which is less than last year's “good” yield, Agee added.  Northeast Recruiter Is Chosen  Frederick M. Nie haus has been named adminssions counselor at Athens College and is assigned to the New England states, accordint to Dr. Frank N. Philpot, president.  Niehaus will be responsible for calling on high school seniors in the Northeast and accepting applications from students who are interested in attending Athens College, Dr. Philpot e)q)lained.  The native of Vincennes, Ind., served in the U. S. Army from 1960 to 1963. After that he earned a bachelor’s degree from Murray State University, Murray, Ky., in 1967 and continued his education there to receive his master’s in Education in 1968.  Ta nner  Planning  Program  Students of Tanner High School, in cooperation with the school’s Student Council, are planning a Veterans’ Day program Monday, November 11 honoring American veterans who have fought and won wars of freedom since 1778.  J. D. Clanton, Limestone County supervisor of education, has been invited as guest speaker. Among other guests expected are Mayor Charles P. Bailey; C. S. Pettus, county superintendent of education; Charles Black, American Legion president; S. R. Sweetland, Disabled American Veterans president; and Larry Terry, Veterans of Foreign Wars president.  Johnny Hammons, president of the Student Council, will be in charge of the program.  PRESIDENT-ELECT RICHARD M. NIXON  vk:e president-elec г sihro t. agnew  Young Lexington Man Dies After Being Injured In Automobile Accident  William Larry Mewbourii, 24, of Lexington Rt. 1, died Monday night in Eliza Coffee Memorial Hospital where he was admitted after being injured in an automobile accident Saturday night.  He was a lifelong resident of Lauderdale County aiKÌ was associated with his hrthor in Limestone County Stockyards.  Funeral services were conducted at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Grassy CumberlaiKl Presbyterian Church with the Rev. H. T. Perry officiating.  Burial was in the adjoining ceremetery. Spry Funeral Homo of Florence directing.  Surviving are the wile, Mrs. Carolyn Newton MewlKmrii; two daughters, Cheryl andCheeree, ^11 of Lexington Rt. 1; i>arents, ^ L and Mrs. L. B. Mewbourii, Ht. i; fhrec-brothers, Tirn and Dave Mewbourii, both  of Lexington Rt. 1, and Kenneth of U. S. Army; three sisters. Miss Ann Mewbourii, employe of the News Courier, and Mis<='  (SEE PAGE TWO)  Veteranas Day Ceremony Is Scheduled For Monday  Veterans’ Day ceremony will be Monday at the Veterans Hall of the Fairgrounds.  The event is being sponsored by the three veterans’ organizations here: Disabled A-rnerican Veterans Chapter 51, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4765, and American Legion Post 49.  A memorial service will be from 11 a.m. until noon.  C. T. Lumpkin, Limestone County veterans’ affairs service officer, said Vietnam veterans and Gold Star motliers, as well as members of the three veterans’ organi  zations, are urged to attend.  Vietnam veterans will be special guests of the three organizations, Lum[)kin said.  Chicken stew will be served toall members and their families.  Lumpkin also urged persons to “lly your flag at your home or business all day on Veterans’ Day.”  In a word to veterans, Lum[jkin added, “If you have not received your 1969 card, you can see your favorite adjutant or (luai-(luartermastei at the Fairgrounds Sunday night or Monday morning.”  CHECKERBOARD  By Beasley Thompsórt  Let’s All Work Together In Constructive Manner  Well, we’re back again alter several weeks absence so tar as the Checkerlhjard is concerned. . .haven't oeen anywhere, but busy right here in Athens and Limestone C(»imty. . .and we do mean bus> So busy, in fact, that we couldn’t find time to get mixed up in the three-ring circus that has f)een going around the United States tor the past three months.  We are sincerely glad it is all over, and we don’t believe there IS any room for a lot of chest beating on the part of anyone. Of course we are talking about the election.  That being the case, we are calling upon every American to take serious stock on hiiiiselt. Let us ask ourselves a tew (luestioiis.  Am I going to contiiiuo to be one oi the smallest ot minorities to help create a ruckus just in order lor television cameras to be trained on me and my ilk? (It seem that if two [jersons wei'c! protesting .something in a crowd oi 1U,UUU, the television boys |ust hap-liened to l>e there.)  Do I want to contribute some  thing to my country other tlum condemnation by maligning the President?  Du I really want to continue to be a chronic griper?  Even though my candidate lost the election, is it really true that I cannot be constructive in my thinkin»; instead of trying t(< do all the damage that my venomous tongue can dish out?  For one, yours truly will not bo heard Ixdittiiiig the new President. He is my President, and will be lor lour years (we hope), and we will do all in our power to help his decisions Work to the lietterment of this country. We hope all of you will pledge deep down in our hearts to do the same, for never have we become so tircHl of hearing the voice of authority maligned. Please, lot’s start the n»‘xt lour years with a dilterent attitude tlnm has been exhibited since Lyndon Baines Johnson had the mis-ioitune ol capturing app-roximatol) twi*-thirds ol the pdlulai vote loi thopresidency. His political enemies began trom die start on a theme song  PAGE J’VVO)  Wallace  Carries  Limestone  Former Vice President Richard M. Nixon has been declared the w inner in 'Y ue s da y ’ s presidential race.  He will assume duties in January. His v’ice president will be Maryland Gov. Spiro Agnew. It was not known until noon Wednesday whether the Republicans or Democrats would be elected, although a television network had predicted the GOP would gain enough electoral votes in Illinois to surpass the 270 needed to win.  Third party candidate George C. Wallace, who was favored by 82 per cent of the 10,317 who cast ballots for presidential candidates in Limestone, carried five states: Alabama, Georgia, Mississ^pi, Louisiana and Arkansas, and will end up with about 14 per cent of the nation’s popular vote. Approximately 80persons cast ballots did not vote in Limestone for a president.  Placing second in the presidential race in Limestone were supporters of the Hubert H. Hurnphrey-Edrnund Muckie ticket, and Nixon-Agnew third.  Highest vote for presidential electors showed 8,442 for Wallace and Gen. Curtis LeMay; 958 for Humphrey-Muskie; and 873 for r^xon-Agnew. Highvute in Limestone for an elector for the Prohibition Party was 45.  These figures are complete in 40 out of 40 boxes, but are unofficial. They were tabulated Tuesday night in the office of Limestone County Sheriff M. W. (Buddy) Evans.  This possibly was a record vote, with some 70 per cent of the county’s approximately 15,000 eligible voters casting ballots.  In the only local race, a seat on the Limestone County Board of Education, Malcolm D. Pepper defeated the Rev. E. D. Bouier, a minister, by a vote of 7,227 to 366. Pepper was the Democratic Party’s nominee and Bouier was on the slate of the National Democratic Party of Alabama. Pepper, an employe of Monsanto, will assume duties on the board next week.  There were three write-in votes. Pat Paulsen, the entertainer, received one write-in  (SEE PAGE TWO)  IN PAGEANT - Twenty-seven girls are vyii^ for Limestorw County Junior Miss Crown Saturday, Nov. 23. The event is sponsored by tlie Atliens Jaycees. From left, front row are DeboraJi Pepper, Athens; Sandra Thompson, Ardmore; Linda SaiKly, Tanner, Geiiia Putman, Ardmore; and Diamie  Davis, Atliens, Second row: Janice Naves, Elkmont; Peggy Miller, Elkmont; June Campbell, Clements; Karen Gates, Ardmore; Kathy Draper, Clements; Suzette Black, Tanner; and Margaret Chancy, Atliens. In photo at right, front row  from left: Mary Roljertson, West IJmestone; Amelia McConnell, West Limestone; Gail Fincher, Athens, KayOster-held, Athens, Sue Nichulsou, West Limestone; and Alice Hancock, Athens. Secoid row; Daneese HoixJ, West Lime  stone; Jeiuiie Barnes, West Limestone; Linda Sirten, West Limestone, Anita Malone, Ardmore; Ann Hess, Athens;Sally Juhiison, Athens; Freda Burgreen, Atliens; and Lucrecia Thomas, Athens.    (Staff    photos by Soiiiiy Turner)   

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