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Athens News Courier Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1968 - Page 1

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   Athens News Courier (Newspaper) - October 24, 1968, Athens, Alabama                               ATHENS News Courier h Accessor To The Alabama Courier Limestone Democrat (1891) and the News Leader (1965) PUBLISHED TWICE EACH WEEK TUESDAY AND THURSDAY Single Copy ATHENS, ALABAMA -THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1968 NEARLY THAT TIME OF YEAR Don't forget to turn your clock back an hour Saturday night, Oct. 26, lest you want to be somewhere an hour late on Sunday. Reminding you that Saturday night you will gain the hour you lost in the spring when the Daylight Saving Time went into effect is pretty Nanci Smith, Athens High School senior. The clocks are part of a collection owned by Dub Green- haw. (Staff photo by Sonny Turner] chools Adopt Budget NUMBER 6 Suit Results From Injury Dr. Lambert Will Head Christmas Seal Campaign Dr. Charles W. Lambert has been named Limestone County chairman of the 1968 Christ- mas Seal Campaign, according to an announcement today by Tanzers Placed On Probation Douglas ahd JeffTanzer, for- mer Athens College students who had been charged session of mariiuana, have been given two-year suspended sen- tences and placed on probation for three years. The sentences were handed out this week by Circuit Judge James N. Bloodworth alter re- ceiving reports that the brot- hers from Great Neck, N.Y., are attending college in their home state and are making "excellent scholastic pro- gress." The brothers, aged 20 and 18, were charged with posses- sion of marijuana after Police Chief A.B. Lightfooot led a raid on their dormitory room. The two pleaded guilty to a lesser charge of possession of a narcotic. Limestone County Board of Education has adopted a budget of for the current school year. Net receipts for the 1968- school year are anticipa- ted at State revenues to the sys- tem are anticipated at of which the state's minimum program will account for Anticipated feder revenues total vocational edu- cational funds, Public 874 which provides for aids to schools in areas where federal employes are located, and Title One of the Elementary and Secondary Schools Education Act of 1961, City And County Officials Will Attend Conference Representatives of the Athens and Limestone County schools systems are to attend the Ad- vministrators Conference on Early Childhood Education Thursday, Oct. 31, at the Shera- ton Motor Inn in Huntsville. Re- gistration will begin at a.m. Going from the county system will be visor of Education J.D. Clanton, and Tanner High School Prin- cipal Harry Richter. Julian Newman, superinten- dent of city schools, and re- presentatives of the city sys- tem probably will attend, but it is uncertain at this time who the representatives will be. Dr. Keith Osborn, recognized national leader in early child- hood education, will be the key- note speaker. Sponsored by the Education Improvement Program and the Tennessee Valley Education Center, the conference will in- volve 16 counties representing 31 school systems. Superintendents and two key jjeopie irom their school sys- tems are invited to tine confe- rence. An invitation is also being extended to staff mem- bers of colleges in the area who have teacher training pro- grams. Main purpose of the confe- rence is to "take a harder look at education, what it can mean to Alabama, and its possibili- of Childcraft, and is on the plan- ning committee of the Child- ren's Television Workshop. He is the author of two books on childhood education and has written articles for many na- tional magazines. Small discussion groups will be held following Dr. Osborn's County revenues are antici- pated at with the 73 per cent of the one-cent county sales tax returning Three-mill district taxes are expected to amount to County Supt. of Education C.S. Pettus said, "We could bit a half-million dollars in sales tax receipts if have a good crop." Pettus said an unappropriated surplus and reserve of is due the county by the state j for the 1967-68 term which, in effect, has already been ex- pended. The county must pre- pare its ensuing year's budget before this money can be re- leased. Proprosed for construction this year, if funds are avail- able, according to Pettus, are cafeterias at Ardmore and East ties for the accord- j presentations and the meeting Limestone and a gymnasium at ing to Dr. Robert T. Ander- son, associate director of TVEC. Dr. Osborn's two presenta- tions will be "The Kindergar- ten Program" and "Kindergar- ten: What, Dr. Osborn is a professor of child development at the Uni- versity of Georgia. He recei- ved a BA degree in psychology from Emory University, an MA in early "childhood education from the State University of Iowa, and a Ph. D. in educa- tional psychology in 1962 from Wayi.e State University. Osborn formerly taught at Wayne State University and Merrill-Palmer Institute. He has been an education consul- tant to the U.S. Office of Edu- cation and a member of the planning committe for Project Head Start. He was on the advisory board Elkmont High School Youth Is Snake Catcher Remember the picture ctf Wilson Green ol Athens Animal Shelter holding a snake in a cage in Tuesday's Mews Courier? The snake was caught by Johnny King, a resident of Airport Subdivision and senior at Elkmont High School, in 3 road near Ardmore "three or lour months jjl.i'ed a stick in front oi the snake to iocus the icplale's attention on the stick while he eased up and caught il beLwJ 13jt head, Jvijj. vai'3 Green had asked Jor the snake in order to find home it An} takers? Kin. a racer snake about two weeks this jvt MI Jj-r, Itai he de'ided to turn it loose, will adjourn at p.m. Clements. Sanitarians From Area Counties Hold Meeting The North Chapter of the Alabama Association of San- itarians held its semi-annual meeting at John C. Calhoun State Technical Junior Col- lege last week and discussed the problems of disposing of solid waste. The chapter is composed of sanitation personnel in 11 coun- ties: Limestone, Morgan, Mad- ison, Colbert, Franklin, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence and Marshall. All of toe counties were repre- sented at the meeting. J. J. Williams, Limestone County sanitarian, said the theme ol the meeting "was a discMssien on -ways and means of properly disposing >oJ tihe solid waste that has become an acute problem in the State of Alabama and is a health mui- saa.ce and health hazard on the highways, county roadsides, areas and even in the streams and lakes." Williams said several tinguished visitors attended the meeting. Among them were Dr. Beity W. Vaughan, health of- ficer Jor Limestone, Lawrence and Morgan counties; Dr. Otis F. Gay, Madison County health officer; Dr. R. E. Harper, health officer for Colbert and Frank- lin coanties; Dr. John S. Her- ring, Lander-dale County health oliicer; Joe Hunt, U, S. Public Health Service; and the Hol- lowing representatives of the Alabama Department of Public Health: Jack Hcneycatt, R, V, Barnes, Carl Aaron, Jack Brewer, R. C. Burkhardt and Rex Fleming. The morning session of the one-day event included two films showing the problems and efforts being made for cor- rection of disposing oi solid waste in many parts of the state. Lectures, along with the showing of films, were de- livered by Honeycutt and Frank Sloan. During the afternoon session, Terry selected a four-member panel, consisting of Dr. Vaughn, Hunt, Elmer Wright and L. H. King. A question aimd answer ses- sion was also conducted. Williams said, "Recess lor lunch found approximately doctors and sanitarians strol- ling over the beautilul mtp-to- date cafeteria style lunch- room, which stands 'not a whit' behind the best in (the state, to be served a special delic- ious meal lor a very reason- able price. This was enjoyed by a33." Williams stated, "It is be- lieved that everyone returned home with a greater knowledge the problems of solid waste disposal and a determination to do something about it" He added, "li have never visited Calhoun, do, by all means? You'll like at" UGF Drive one-fourth of "Athens-Limestone United Givers Fund drive has been reached. The goal is John Jenkins, president of the Alabama Tuberculosis As- sociation. "I know the importance of the Christmas Seal Campaign to the residents of Limestone Jenkins said, "and I am convinced we will more than top our goal of The annual Christmas Seal Cam- paign is the sole support of the County TB Association's year- round" program against TB and other respiratory diseases. Christmas Seals provide funds for the voluntary campagin a- gainst tubemilosis in search for new and better drugs, seek- ing out unknown cases of TB; reserach and study not only of TB but of emphysema, chronic bronchitis and other cripplers of the breath of life, and ser- vices topatients and the The Campaign will get under way officially on Nov. 12 with the slogan, "Use Christmas Seals It's a Matter of Life and Breath." Accoiding to Jenkins, "The startling fact that both the active case rate and the death rateper hundred thousand population for TB in Albania are almost dou- ble the respective rates lor the United States as a whole is clear evidence of the necessity of stepping up Alabama's campaign against this unnecessary dis- ease. Tuberculosis is still an infectious disease. Every new case is a menace unless prompt- ly brought under treatment. "I congratulate the people of Junior Achievement May Be Expanded To County Schools In Next Year By SONNY TURNER Three counseling firms with 30 achievers in each made up the organ- ized Athens Junior Achievement program, which meets every Tuesday night at 7 o'clock for Athens High School students only. The counseling firms for the program, which is to learn a business by doing organization are Cutler Hammer, Decco; Red Hat Poultry, Red Cap In- dustries and Athens Lingerie Some of the products made by the achievers are wooden plaques, letter holders, receipt holders and Christmas bows. Eacli company makes different products. Athens High School senior Dan Jeanette is the president of Decco, while Derrell Thomas presides over Red Cap Industries. There are three advisors i irom each firm in the program, j Decco management advisor is j Tom Minor; sales advisor is Bill Reinhold; and production advisor is Gerald McNairy. Advisors for Red Cap are management advisor. Henr} Blizzard, production advisor, Lyndon Morris; and sales ad- visor, James Kelley. Athens Lingerie advisors are management advisor, Leroy Thomas; production advisor, Terry Clemmons; and sales advisor, Bobby "Wigginton. Joe Warren, Athens Junior achievement center manager said that the program hopes to expand the county schools next year, but the answer is unknown at this time. Bill Kreiilein is the oveiall manager for North Centra] Ala- bama Junior Achievenl pru- Limestone Countv on the fact that an outstanding citizen like Dr. Lambert has volunteered to lead this campaign. I am con- fident that this year's campaign be the most successful Board Appoints 3 Persons Limstone County Boara of Revenue Monda> named three persons to the Tanner Water and Fire Protection Authority. They are Herman Swanner Jr., George Breeding and Will- iam Cole, all members of the board. Other members of the board who had been selcted by per- sons attending a meeting at Tanner High School to discuss the proposed water system to serve southwest Limestone County are Ronald Haney, Erskin Johnson, Hoyt Earl Wil- liamson, William A. Owens Jr., Robert A. Groce, Don Killen and Lane Braly. In other action, the board purchased a crawler bulldozer for District 3 from Tractor and Equipment Co. of Decatur for other bids were submitted. A backhoe was approved for District 4 at a cost of from Joe Money Machinery Co. of Huntsville. Four other bids were submitted. Alabama Supply Co. of Athens, with a bid of was low for the purchase of a scrubber-polishing machine to be used in the courthouse. A contract to supply the county with anti-freeze was awarded to Stuvall Batter} Co. for per gallon. A damage suit has been filed by a man injured while working as a on construction of the Brown's Feny nuclear power plant. Willard Kennedy is claiming the amount as damages from General Electric Co., general contractor in charge of con- structing Unit Number One at the plant. Kennedy is claiming negli- gence on the pait of the defen- dant. The incident occurred Oct. 16, 1967. The complaint, filed in Lime- stone County Circuit Court and demanding a jury trail, contends that Kenned} project as a welder for Pitts- burgh-Des Moines Steel Co., a sub-contractor. Kennedy contends that as a proximate result ligence of the defendant in fail- ing to keep its works, ways, lighting and scaffolding upon and about which the plaintiff was invited and directed to work, in a reasonably safe con- dition, he slipped and fell." his head hit a metal pipe, a part ul the scaffolding, in the fall. The complaint avers that Kennedy suffered severe and permanent.neck back and other injuries, as well as medical bills incurred as a result of the incident. Recipients Of Calls Announced Mrs. Jural Evans of Athens Rt.6 is the recipient of a three- minute telephone call to any man or woman in the U. S. armed forces. The program was sponsored by Communications Workers of America Local 3903 which re- presents communications work- ers in Limestone, Morgan, Cull- man and Lawrence Counties. Mrs. Evans plans to telephone (SEE PAGE TWO) Contracts Total TVA today announced the award- ing of three contracts totaling for the Brown's Ferry- nuclear power plant which is under construction. They were: Drvwell uenetrations for Unit 3, Tube Turns Division of Chemetron Corp., Isolated phase bus system (SEE PAGE TwO) Privilege License Due Soon Limestone County Pro- bate Judge Mason C. Free- man reminds that Oct. 31 is the deadline for paying privilege licenses. Deadline for buying 1969 vehicle tags is Nov. 15. Freeman said auto- mobile tags had been sold through Wednesday. There were car tags sold last year. CHRISTMAS BOWS IN THE MAKING Members oi the Red Cap Industries make bows du ring the Athens Junior Achieve- orogram which has 30 meelsevrr> Tuesday night. From left are Cirady Moore, Paw Morris, production advisor, and Derre33 (Staff photo In So   

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