Saturday, February 5, 1853

Nautical Standard

Location: London, Middlesex

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Nautical Standard (Newspaper) - February 5, 1853, London, Middlesex AND STEAM NAVIGATION GAZETTE. " ENGLAND'S BEST BULWARKS ARE HER. WOODEN WALLS. Vol. VIII.-No. 6.] SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1853. [Price 6d. Editorial :-Manning the Navy-Naval Prospects ---- 81 - Navy Pay-Press-phobia, of the Board of Admiralty .. 82 Our Marine Policy .................................. 83 Ad.m irauty :-Promotions-Appointments.............. 84 Coast Guard Service.................................. 84 Portsmouth-Devonport-Woolwich .................. 85 Sheerness-Mediterranean............................ 86 West Indies, Halifax, and North America ............ 88 Royal Marines.......................................... 87 Dockyards............................................. 87 Biography............................................ 87 Obituary ............................................ 87 The Reserve Steam Squadron.......................... 87 Coast Defences ........................................ 87 The Royal Geographical Society........................ 88 Institution of Civil Engineers........................... 88 Seamen's Hospital Society the Dreadnought............ 89 The Caloric Ship Ericsson.............................. 89 TO SUBSCRIBERS. Persons desirous of receiving the Nautical Standard are respectfully informed that it may be obtained through all news agents, or forwarded direct from the Office by the Saturday Morning mails, > on payment of- � s> <j. Per quarter .'................. 0 6 6 Per half-year.................. 0 13 0 Per year .................... 1 6 0 All Post-office Orders for �1 6s., annual subscription payable in advance, should be made payable to Mr. Horatio Guy, at the General Post-office, St. Martin's-le-Grand. Feb. 7, 1813. The 38-gun frigate Amelia, mounting 48 guns, Capt. the Hon. Paul Irby, cruizing off the northern end of Tamara, on the coast of Africa, sustained �n action with, the TVenr.h fvigato Atct\iuac, Commodore Bouvet, mounting 44 guns. After a close engagement from 7h. 45m. p.m. until llh. 20m. p.m. the combatants gradually receded from the contest. The Amelia, out of 349 men, had 4 lieutenants, 1 lieutenant of marines, and 46 men killed; Capt. Irby severely and 89 wounded. The Arethuse is stated to have lost 31 killed, 74 wounded. -8, 1805. The French 16-gun brig Dame Ernouf, captured off Barbadoes by 16-gun brig Curieux, Capt. Geo. E. B. Bettesworth, after an action of 40 minutes, and the loss of 30 killed, 40 wounded, out of a crew of 120 men. Curieux, out of a crew of 67, had 6 killed, 3 wounded. -8, 1808. Three boats of 36-gun frigate Meleager, under Lieut. G. Tupman, attacked the polacca privateer Renard, anchored near San Jago de Cuba, and having carried her, she was brought out, without sustaining any loss. - 8, 1809. Boats of Amphion, 32, under Lieut. C. R. Phillott, attacked an armed brig, mounting 6 guns, and a trabaccolo, lying in a small creek in the island of Melida, and, although protected by a large body of troops, both vessels were captured, and two warehouses destroyed. -8, 1813. American schooner Lottery, of 6 guns, and 28 men, lying in Lynhaven Bay, captured, after a sharp resistance, by boats of Maidstone, Belvidera, Shannon, and Statirafrigates, with loss of 19 wounded. British, 1 killed, 3 wounded. -9, 1746. French 50-gun ship Auguste, captured in the Channel by Portland, 50, Capt. Chas. Stevens, after a sharp action, in which the Auguste was totally dismasted," and had 50 killed, 94 wounded; whilst the Portland had only 3 killed, 13 wounded. -9, 1799. French 36-gun frigate Prudente, captured off Cape Natal, on the South East Coast of Africa, by Daedalus, 32, Capt. H. L. Ball, after an action of 50 minutes, and the loss of 27 killed, 22 wounded. Daedalus, 2 killed, 12 wounded. 10, 1809. French 40-gun frigate Junon, captured off the Virgin Islands, after a long chase, by Horatio and Latona frigates, Driver, Asp, and Superior sloops, after a gallant resistance, and the loss of 130 in killed and wounded. Horaeio, 7 killed, 26 wounded; Latona, 6 wounded; and Driver, 1 wounded. - 11, 1744. The combined fleet of France and Spain, consisting of 28 ships-of-the-line, including 3 of 50 guns, under Admirals De Court and Navarro, attacked near Toulon, by Admiral Matthews, with 29 ships-of-the-line, exclusive of 05-gun ships. The action lasted from lh. p.m. until sunset. The Poder, Spanish 74, was the only ship caiiptred. The loss of the British fell principally upon the Marlborough, 74, Captain Cornwall, who, with 42 men and officers, was killed, 120 wounded. Mercantile Steam Marine.............................. 90 Peninsular and Oriental Company.................... 9ft British and North American Company................ 90 Royal West India Mail Company.................... 90 American Royal Mail Steam Packet Company.......... 91 Reduction of the French Navy ........................ 91 Ocean Surveying ......................,............... 91 Foreign and Colonial Intelligence ...................... 92 France .................<.......................... 92 Law Intelligence ...................................... 93 Admiralty Court .................................... 93< Hydro-graphical Investigations in the Chinese Seas ...... 94 Original Correspondence.............................. 94 Warrant Officers' Widows Pensions.................. 94 Lamentations of the Steam Engine .................. 94 Notices to Correspondents.............................. 95 Births. Marriages, and Deaths.......................... 95 Advertisements ........................................ 96 C|e Statical JSiaitelr. ROYAL NAVY. "Whosoever commands the Sea, commands the trade; whosoever commands the trade op the World, commands the Treasures of the World, and consequently the World itself."-Sir W. Raleigh. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1853. MANNING THE NAVY - NAVAL PROSPECTS. If ever, during the history of these realms, the destiny of the Royal Navy was clouded by singular uncertainty, it is at the present moment. It may be fairly said, indeed, that all is in a condition of transition, but where the limit of change may be placed, is a question which time and the circumstances which are yet unborn can alone evobe. At the close of the late war, we arrived at a point which terminated, perhaps, the greatest epoch of our Naval history. Successive Naval Administrations had done all in their power to mar the spirit and energies of the men to whom was finally intrusted the safety and salvation of the country. Our ships were notoriously unequal to the struggle in which they had to contend, and the means of producing others were entirely wanting, and at a time when the demands of the country became daily more pressing, and when nothing short of miracle seemed sufficient to ward off the misfortunes which threatened us on all sides. But a righteous cause and ever-watchful Providence brought us in the hour of need a ready help in our trouble : the energies, talent, and courage of a Nelson-who formed the centre of as bright a galaxy of great names as ever rose above the horizon of an heroic age -supplied all that we wanted. It is true our ships were worn out and debilitated-it is - 12, 1811. Boats of Active and Cerberus, frigates, under Lieut. James Dickinson, attacked some vessels in the harbour of Ortona, and in spite of a heavy fire, carried a trabaccolo of 6 guns, captured 10 other vessels and destroyed the store houses, with no greater loss than. 4 men wounded. also true that they had been made the receptacles of jail-birds, and the very refuse and cesspool of a corrupt society; yet was there left enough of salt to correct the fermenting mass, and our Navy, in spite of all that was arrayed against it, internally and externally, secured for us a throne upon the waters which nothing but our own fault can ever hereafter snatch from us. But with the leisure of peace came the reaction which ever follows in the wake of a condition of extreme tension. Our civil establishments connected with the Navy were found to consist of a barbarous collection of antiquated patchwork. Hence there was no lack of excuse for reformation, and a thousand reformers sprang up to reap the rich harvest which hung luxuriantly in the ear, and waited only for the husbandman to come and reap it. Reform, however, is not always a bona fide deity : it is too often a mere idol, and the greatest extravagancies, and not unfrequently the grossest acts of injustice are perpetrated in its name. Where real reform was suggested by the experience of the past, little was done to propitiate it; and in 1830, when a Reform Parliament and reforming Ministry ruled the councils of the nation, everything was changed but little was actually reformed; and the Navy at the present time groans under most of the evils which marred its energies during the war, and which have never ceased to find a voice since that period, amongst the hundreds of brave fellows who survived the day of danger, only to struggle with official contumely and national ingratitude. Since the�^ast gun was fired against an enemy's standard, the art of naval warfare has changed its character. Civilization and the arts of life have made the most rapid progress, and as a matter of course, a share of human ingenuity has devoted itself to improving the art of war, and the general appliances of military science. All is changed as regards the wants and means of an effective fleet at the present day; but no progressive improvement has been applied by our reformers in that direction. Although the requirements of a seaman at the present day are more numerous