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London Reviewer Newspaper Archive: October 12, 1834 - Page 1

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   London Reviewer (Newspaper) - October 12, 1834, London, Middlesex                                THE OCTOBER THE WEEKLY The Westminster There ore some admirable papers in this number of the Westminster written in the true spirit of which has for its object the destruction of all things and the establishment of universal In a fine article on Criminal Law the writer exposes the evils of the existing system of criminal and while giving Lord BROUGHAM due praise for his Bill for establishing a new court for the trial of offences in the metropolis and its explains in what manner that Bill is In the Parliaments of our Ancestors we are introduced to some curi ous particulars respecting the ancient legislature of the when it was not at all an easy matter for the people to get men to take upon themselves the task of representing them in An article upon the Second Session of the Reformed Parliament has the following but very characteristic One of the wits of the day has well that the trick put upon John Bull by the Ministry and the Parliament dur ing the present is like that of Tony Lump who would persuade his mother that she had travelled forty miles from home when the good woman was almost at her own the first Session of the present Parliament earned the title of the Donothing the Muchado aboutnothing will serve as well for the mains for the people to see that such title shall not serve as well for the Let them persist in calling upon the industry of their representatives there is a vast deal of nonsense jind pettiness in the efforts of the working but there is also a vast deal of good and but for their burrow ing perseveringly much of the good that has leavened the lumps of aristocratic le gislation would never have Press be the encouraging cry to all men who think they may do At the their projects may be and become beacons of the true limits of Press till the Ministers discover their fitness to and the House has adapted its internal machinery to the nature of its egregious folly of the projectors of the New South Australian colony is ably exposed in an article to which we would di rect the attention of all persons interested in the Lord BROUGHAMS backslidings are smartly castigated in The Vagaries of the School There are a variety of other most inte resting articles in this from one of which on Banking in the United States we make the following THE FIRST DEALINGS IN The dealings of the first British settlers in Vir ginia were for the most part carried on in barter the small stock of the precious metals which they brought from Europe being soon exchanged for fo reign comforts or Tobacco was the circulating medium of the Colonists and as early as a sagacious governor that it should be taken in all trading transactions at per neither more nor on the penalty of three years servitude in the A jfew years certain Spanish and Canary wines were ordered to be sold at a gallon in or in tobacco whileSherry and Sack were rated at in and only in Why tobacco should be valued so differently in different does not Fine young and uncor were shipped by the Virginia Company in to the to be married to the residents and in 1620 the price of each was a hundred of though wnen the article was as much as a hundred and fifty was It was made a law of the colony that whenever a settler obtained a wife on the debt should be recoverable in preference to all An attempt was made in Pennsylvania in to procure a law to render the products of the colony a legal tender at their current rates but it In Maryland an Act was passed in making tobacco a legal tender at a penny a and Indian corn at twentypence a But in as early as a mint was established at which and threepenny pieces in silver were About this period silver became plentiful in several of the whose inhabitants carried on a suc cessful trade with the West Indies and the Spanish But still it was thought a sagacious expe to increase their wealth by raising the nominal value of the Thus in South Carolina the dollar was ordered to pass for in Vir ginia and New England at in and New at and in New York and North Carolina at These va rious denominations are still notwith standing many good republicans regard them as badges of colonial and the decimal cur rency of dollars and introduced it is said at the suggestion of Oliver late Governor of is in almost every respect so much more It thus appears that the cur rency of the American Colonies from the earliest even when it consisted principally of corn and was tampered with by the ruling first paper money issued in the Colonies from the earliest eveo when it consisted principally of corn and was tampered with by the ruling The first paper money issued in the colonies was in by The government waa pressed for means to pay some clamorous and having no persuaded them to takeTreuusury Notes secured on the lands of the in the place of The quantity of paper being at first it held its value tolerably well but tht government paper of that colony never went below the comparatively moderate depreciation of 700 per Bull temptation of making money with so much ease was and was so frequently yielded that by degrees the currency was till in 1741 it was at a discount of 1100 In South Carolina the same plan was but the The Oriental Annual for 183f and The Oriental Annual for appears to have been so favourably received by the as to induce the proprietors to continue the Their plan is an excellent every three volumes is to form a the first of is to be illustrative of the three English Of this the second volume now before us is dedicated to and the views and descriptive matter are most instructive and Independently of these lasting the Oriental Annual is one of the most splendid works of the the plates are of the highest order of the printing is and the binding The views are taken from designs by who has obtained no little celebrity by his repre sentations of Indian character and The Interior of a Mosque at is a masterly work of furnished with an elabo rateness perfectly A view at Nujibabad is remarkable for its peculiar and The Favourite of the Harem rivals the most successful embellishments of the fancy The views of the Mausoleum at Mosque at the Bernar and the Mosque in the Coun batore are of equal We think the plates of animals might with advantage have been and others of greater interest nor do we much admire the portrait of the Rajpootni The scene with a boa constrictor and a boats crew is one of great The literature by the Caunter is pleasing it is replete with sketches of scenery and and nar ratives of a most spiritstirring some extracts of which we will lay before our JUNGLES ON We entered the mountains by the Coaduwar meeting several who gave us the rather discouraging information that the snow had begun to fall before they left where it was our intention to make our final As we the sky appeared to be tinged with a deep dingy upon suddenly emerging from a narrow to our astonishment the distant mountains seemed to be in a The fire swept up their sides to the extent of undu lating like the agitated waves of the ocean when reddened by the slanting beams of the setting It was like an ignited exhibiting an effect at once new and This striking phenomenon is not by any means and is accounted for by the larger as they are swayed by the emitting fire from their hard glossy stems through the violence of their and thus spreading destruction through the mountain These are so extensive that the fire con tinues to burn for many days and is often as suddenly extinguished as it is ignited by those mighty deluges of so common in mountainous wherethe water pours from the clouds in confluent masses resembling small and in a few moments arrests the progress of a still more formidable No one can form a con ception of the violence of the torrents which oc casionally falj on these from anything that has been witnessed in the more temperate lati tudes of the opposite Here when they do to use the sublime imagery of the Jewish the windows of heaven ap pear to be It is possible for man or beast to stand against the impetuosity of their Every living thing seeks the shelter of the forests where immense the growth of afford but an imperfect A BULL Before we quitted we had the op portunity of seeing a an amusement not unfrequenfcly indulged in by the petty Rajahs of the mountain These bulls had been brought from were exhibited by a party of who expected a small gratuity from each The animals were about the size of a Bengal or of an English bull two years and a half They no ex crescence between the common to the Bengal unlike that species were and extremely They had little sharp which were very smooth and bore a fine Their fore legs were so short that but for the prodigious depth from the upper part of the shoulder to the extremity of the they would have appeared stunted and dispropor From the extreme narrowness of the compared with the depth and breadth of the fore their hind legs seemed much too Their necks were very indicating amazing which they sufficiently manifested in the while their heads were delicately They were of a deep liver When brought into the being led by strong ropes attached to their horns they pawed the threw themselves into the most violent and exhibited every symptom of the most desperate The men who led them forward showed great dexterity in managing these impetuous ani adroitly avoiding their plunges and bringing them to a degree of controul quite con sidering the intense excitement under which they were evulently The bulls seemed per fectly to comprehend why they were Jed into the betraying the most violent symptoms of im patience to try their while the spectators were no less impatient to witness a scene as novel as it promised to be At a given signal the ropes were slipped from the creatures heads and they were Jeft at In a moment they sprang forward as if to ascertain whether they were really released from the restraint of the then curv ing their like a strung as preparing to 1 exert their utmost they tore up the ground with their plunged and their eyeballs at the same time projecting from the sockets with a savage stare and flashing with the most portentous They ran wildly round the area for more than a minute before they came in gradually narrowing the circuit as if col lecting themselves for the onslaught each watch ing to take his adversary at an At length they met each other full in darted forward with astonishing and tremendous indeed was the shock Both staggered for an in but bore the concussion without giving when their horns became locked and then com medced the grand struggle for Fierce as the onset had it did not appear in the slightest degree to have diminished the energies of these pugnacious On the without wounding each other and their horns continuing they displayed wonderful strength and dex each preventing the other from goring him so that the contest was really far less terrible than might have been anticipated from the manner in which they commenced the They were occupied full twenty minutes in this energetic strug gle without disengaging their exerting all ihe while their utmost strength to cast one another upon the Alternately retreating and ad as their powers relaxed or the earth flew from their heels in showers while they pressed their hard heads together with still more determined obstinacy and with the might which rage added to their ordinary At length the weaker began to and as he the feeling his pushed on with renewed He felt that he was about to con and with a roar of anticipated triumph forced his adversary on his At this moment the keepers and by striking the victor on the nose with a large forced him to disen gage his when they secured both the com batants with cords and led them from the area amid the cheers of the gratified FIGHT BETWEEN AN ELEPHANT AND AN A few days we received another invita tion from the Newaub to witness a fight between an elephant and an alligator this we willingly ac expecting to see something tremendous from the collision of two animals so formidable and so different in their habits and highness had made the necessary preparations for affording us this new species of having sent to the river Goggra a who had succeeded in catching a couple of large one of which was sevenandtwenty feet They were conveyed from the banks of the Goggra to the Gooraty upon On reaching the scene intended for chis strange we found the alligators so exhausted from the uncongenial mode of their and from having been so long without that they could scarcely but remained upon the banks of the stream without attempting to and in a state of almost com plete was much more tor pid than the in consequence of having been longer caught and consequently longer a A large elephant was at length led to the though it approached with evident symptoms of distrust for these animals appear to have an in stinctive perception of danger far more keen than any other beast of the He eyed the hideous monster which lay half gasping upon the river for several moments before he ventured to and when at length he did the largest alligator opened its ponderous jaws and made a snap at his but he had taken care to curl it up between his thus securing it from The finding itself snapped at its aggressors but as the effort was made without any vigour or the elephant easily evaded the intended infliction by actively retreating beyond the reach of its dreadful Carefully avoiding a nearer approach to an enemy who it evident had still the power to do him a serious he cautiously advanced towards the other alligator which was lying on the bank in an almost ex hausted and on getting close to coiled up his trunk as before that it might be beyond the reach of then placing his foot upon the body of the huge pressed upon it with the whole weight of his The creature immediately opened its mouth to an hideous extent and gave a shrill scream but though crushed by such a it was so tenacious of that it was not dead when we left the and revived consi derably upon water being thrown over The gnashing of the monsters when the elephant trod upon might I should think have been heard at a distance of at least two hundred A pariah dog was now fastened by a strong cord to this which immediately took him into its but to our utter astonishment the dog soon released himself from his horrible and at tacking the animals bit it so severely that the blood copiously The creature seemed to be quite insensible of the and waa manifestly so nearly exhausted as to be almost bereft of To this circumstance must of course be attributed the dogs escape his perilous His was more than once within the alligators but he seemed to thrust it in with and to draw it out at Having at length seized his dying enemy again by the he bit it with such severity that the as if in its expiriug opened its jaws and immediately closing them upon its crushed him so forcibly that when he was which wus immediately done by one of the attendants who was present to conduct the he appeared to be quite Water wus again thrown upon the alligator and the Upon the former it had little or no effect but the to our extreme almost im mediately rose staggered for a few and the moment it was ran off us if nothing hud Tylney A 3 By Ittowat Thomas the notorious has com menced and produced a regular three volumed which he informs ua took him six years to A work that has been so long in progress ought to be a good and Tylney Hall is far from being of the opposite It is woven of mingled puthoa and and will afford much pleasure to all subscribers to circulat ing libraries during their perusal of It hag a hero and poet and a rascal the first is gallant and the second tender aad sweet as heroines always the third and the last malicious and malignant as any novel reader can We prefer the humorous and for the amusement of our readers shall make one or two extracts from those portions of Hoods as yet unpublished UNFORTUNATE 11 Joseph the unfortunate postillion thus referred was a living example of that turned which attends upon certain devoted individuals through Born under an evil probably a falling he had been oftener thrown from the pitched from the than any postboy of his or rather He waa literally a marked man in a stricter sense than the term generally for the bridge of MB was he had lost one with the whole of his front and had a limp in his left sonal deodands levied against him from mishaps purely He had been a careful and a but sometimes the commissioners of roads left stumbling blocks in his sometimes he was the victim of inexperienced and inebriated charioteers who drove agaiust him and aboveall he had the luck of being associated with more and other fourlegged than any boy of his He had had as many horses killed under him as Prince Eugejiev and more runaways than the driver of the Us stage to Rendered superstitious at lasti by such a succession of poor Joe had be oeme something of a fatalist he gave up inspecting the or looking at the and war never particularly ready to pull up bis horses head incase of a It was all he as to how a horse was held in his hand if he was rid by a hunfortunate fellow that wasbornedon 4 Want of care thus coalescing with Want of an increased munber of casualties obtained for Joethe unenviable name of had been discharged by five successive for falls and which bad inflicted and on his own He had been rejected by the officers of the the and the parish j he had been imprisoned for because he picked up a dead hare discharged one Kings and committed the next morning for sleeping in the open air He been crossed in love by the only girl he had addressed he had been made a father by a frail fair one he never saw to in custody for a murderous act he had never templated and In this abject state he gave up striving with hiBfate l TWIGG8 PLEASANT WATER PARTYJ You must and self determined last summer to take a and we took ad vantage of a general and shut for day V own vote was for Hornteywood house but as the boys are fond of they were both for boating up to and BO was and that we might have a pic nicking cold collection on the dine on any grass except said with a laugh at her own gave me the lumbargo for a I knew how the damp would rise with water ajil round us but was and insisted on laying the cloth on a little to be like Robinson It waa called an said Miss Twigg a verdant tree iu the he said Twigg M ought to have bered that the Thames was a tidy and always rising falling likethe there we were pie cold cold and all at a Mercy on the islands getting lit tler And sure as we the water and creeping till it came to the edge of the tablecloth and threatened to swal low up everything There we in eminent and no boat for those boys bad gone up the river after some Haw I haw t haw t burst out the graceless junior and when and looked for there was Tilda on the of the tree and mother little further down with father hugging the up to his coatflaps in water I None of your said Twigg very sternly if Id been drowned through your swan you wouldnt be in the station in life I assure Sir Mark my when I saw the devouring element raging round was very serious indeed 1 Heres a thniks for a man of my I declare I could have cried with said to see the good table cloth floating away and the and all the nice being As for the silver forks and it was all lost in the deep for though we paid a waterman something to look for them when the island came up lie never brought us nothing but a mustardpot full of mud TWIGG IN A STRANGE Twigg proceeds to a bachelor squires in his Upon his knocking at the a small spring panel exhibits the words Not at He pulls the bell and the door he walks in and comes to a circular room panoramically as tinuadon of the prospect Been through the one To observe the general effect the   

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