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London Reviewer: Sunday, November 24, 1833 - Page 1

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   London Reviewer (Newspaper) - November 24, 1833, London, Middlesex                                THE NOVEMBER THE WEEKLY MR ALLAN CUNNINGHAM AND THE MODERN BRITISH Riographical and Critical History of the Litera ture of the last Wfty By Allan Cunning ham British Vide of 2Cthfr An nuthor may be very good authority In mat ters relating to the mere personal history and out ward semblance of his contemporaries but not so with reference to their genius and Of men with whom we are in habits of companion as friends or we cannot speak justly apd impartially the heart and head get to war and alas 1 a far more ig noble department of the human fabric upon the and truth and discernment are lost sight of in the In apite of our knowledge of this common we expected great things of ALLAN CUNNINGHAMS longaauounced con with the above to the pages of our capital We have and not a His comments upon the Poets of the last and their we must reluctantly express onr of the flim siest and most commonplace kind much too often directed and coloured by feelings altogether personal amiably we admit j merely We proceed to make a few casual remarks upon his taking the names in the order a most strange and unfit one 1 in which he has chronicled but not great is placed at the head of CUNNINGHAMS melo dious troop and of him the historian that he was studious in his fond of and was bied to the more congenial employ ment for a follower of the must than many seem willing to a strange the false hood of which is evidenced by the whole tenor of our literary The closetsighs of an excel lent and popular a we of we often heard at mid night to bear us in estimate of law versut CUNNINGHAM tells us there is no grossness in the poetry of a monstrous assertion Of Beauty he also he Burns has written with more fervor and inspiration than all other modern poets put together the compliments a vile phrase he pays are destined to live while we have loveli ness in This is a most drawingroom estimate of Mister Burns He Who walkd in glory in joy Following his along the As little thought of paying compliments as of sowing bugles the furrows of his We that BURNS has written of beauty with more fervour inspiration all other modern poets put with more animal fervor he may for songs of beauty that seem if sung iy a spirit of a give us those of a SHELLEY and a KKATSI Frojn wfe are led to CRABBE and from savory and exhilirat recoUeotiona of the plenty and the joys rich BardBankers table wholly hutorlaoVsoberer faculties and we ac unreasonable trumpingup of the merits of the smooth versifier of Pleasures of of which he curiously assures cootiuued to be although The Pleasures Hope came info the market dirty phrase for a poet to use of poetry 1 with some thing of which TALENT is not the chief fault of ROGERS was want and we are of that the pervevu talent WILLIAM HAZLWJT formed a very just estimate of the com pliant of SAMUBL another as CUNNINGHAM in the whole list of living men of no be named in poetry and the delicacies of the table smoke up before ourj eyes 1 A delicate delicate saacei for taste for a wood cock I A for and immortality would be not a whit more of phraseology than this eternal taste for My father did something some thing grow to he had kind of has he in great says his panegyrist he indeed for he brain a fly with a in the words of the histo is with choice fruits on his garden fine wines on his savory dishes done fo a turn on his and money in the bank to work while he have u tastef a for poetry more be altogether a genius of the first CUNNINGHAM does but justice to ROGERS dinners he says As a remarkable fact in the biography of this gentleman of rhyme and a taste for we are told by the that the agreement of MILTON regarding Paradise and of Dryden respecting bis translation of both bearing their among many matters rare and in his posses appropriate consummation of banking a taste for poetry These statements of matters in the principal interest of CUNNINGHAMS Critical as a our unfavourable estimate has been repeatedly made public an esti the correctness of we are the judgment of a far posterity will and which eveu CUNNINGHAMS citation of that extraordinary the as giving the pith and essence of the Highland as well as a brilliant picture of and to show his large is scarcely calculated to set Let us quote thin metrical which CUNNINGHAM holds to be so demon strative of divinity Pibroch of Donuil Pibroch of Wnke thy wild voice anew Summon Clan Come come Hark to the summons Come in your Gentles and Leave the leave Leave nets and barges Come in your fighting Broadswords nnd Leave untended the The flock without shelter Leave the corse And the bride at the Come as the winds come when Forests are rended Come as the waves come when Navies are Faster faster Faster and faster and Tenant and The right butterwomanfl rank to quoth Touchstone was a judge of these although he wore A writer in Praters Magazine lately expressed himself willing to do without LEIGH HUNTS magnificent Sonnet to the Nile the Pibroch of qua non with and with all such as This song is characteristic of all SCOTTS observes after quoting it we think too and hence our low estimate of that To the name of whose mind is the original source of all the great poetry of the CUNNINGHAM devotes but a few superficial and kind of scissorsandpasteconcocted which he winds up to a with telling us that holds a situation in the is conscious of the value of his eloquent in and one having met we would wish to meet This is as good as to tell that the sun is occasionally circumstanced in a is aware of the worth ofhis warmth and resplendent in his and a glory having seen and felt we should would wish to see and feel CUNNINGHAMS Wordswortbiana prove inestimable to all in Europe who do homage to the genius of the Great Poet 1 He omitted one thing he has to tell us whether WOURDSWORTH like a taste for From we more voluminous than tolerable powers sre greater than his his renegadoism and a sincere champion in our historian of modern British who writes of him and his in fashion which does credit rather to his grateful friendship than to his impartial Is it not strange that the dramatic poem by which alone SOUTHEY will live in the thankful and admiring hearts of the men of the Wat that of his literary should not be even men tioned in the biography of him by HAM The we may reu spected the Historians and would not throw his good reproachfully in the face or his But CUNNINGHAM must be that it is the first duty of both historian and biographer to keep implicit faith with the the He writes to enlighten the Two Hemi spheres about ROBERT and claps RO BERT SOUTHBYS Wat Tyler under a bushel This is not quite as it should ALLAN CUN We shall return to these poetical matters next Hampden in the Nineteenth Century Colloquiei on the Errors and Improvement of In tioO Volumes There is no real name of the author in this or its which is well dated as to a condition of men and things that may tie in the of a thousand good long and years to He puts a brand to the present to kindle up a light for the which shall have all the warmth and the radiance without any of the burning of the The Hampden of the Nineteenth Century is no ghost of him of the Seventeenth but an enthusiastic with his friend Filzosborue the simu lated recorder of the Colloquies and other fine practical seeks to convince a variety of notorious personages of the wisdom and practica and to ensure the of the Co or New System of so greatly championed and furthered by in which things are to be arranged upon the principle that every mans character ia formed for not by and in which cooperation is to take the place of and all to labour for not each for to the exclusion to the detriment of The work appears to be a powerful and remarkable We shall peruse the volumes aud give a more extended account of their nature and contents in a future The Dying Suny by Miss The words by Alfred Pleasant notes aud as pleasant LAW a new if our memory serves in our lyrical poetry appears to have the right art of adapting the sense to the a although a when authors mutt write for actors aud instead of musicians and actors humbly accommo dating themselves to the vagaries of The Dying Summers Day we likely to be come a populnr even from drawingroom to pianoforte to The Practice upon Writ of Trial Jor the recovery of Debts not exceeding Fly Man of the Middle Barristeraf A Work of great research has been handed to us from the pen of this descriptive of the nature of a Proceeding by Action at pursuant to a recent Act of to recover a not exceeding This Work is admirably adapted for the instruction of the Legal The alterations made recently in the Practice of commencing and prosecuting Actions having been and most materially a Work of this description has become essentially necessary to the Legal Practitioner and it will no a valuable nnd requisite addition to Legal The Theory of the Practice is stu diously and minutely and many useful Forms adapted to the alterations in the A wellturned compliment is introduced in the and a quotation made of some Observations of Lord who has that A calm and dispassionate manner and is ne cessary to the administration of MansePs work cannot be too much OF MODERN Taylor Coleridge was born in the year 1773 was educated at Christs Hospital he married one of the sisters of Southey wrote political articles in a newspaper delivered lectures on poetry and published his collected in two He now resides near and sees company on the Friday even Leyden was born of humble near in the year Lord Minto offered him a situation in the East which he In he had unite him self to the expedition dispatched against and fell a victim to fatigue and the wear and tear of an overardent and a severe was born in and educated in the school of Christs where he was the companion of Thomas Campbell was born at Glasgow in when his father was seventy years of He went to school and wrote verses almost as soon as he mastered the use of his pen at cqjlege he carried away all the prizes he con tended Having distinguished himself as a Greek he obtained the situation of tutor in a family in He was not twenty when he published The Pleasures of Hope poem which he shakes his head at Camp bell is of middle well with a quick eye and a quick He was made Lord Rec tor of Glasgow by the free impulse of the youth of the West was deep snow when he reached the College the students were drawn up in one another the poet ran into the threw several snowballs with unerring aim j summoning the scholars around him in the delivered a speech replete with philosophy and is needless to say how this was wel Moore was born in in May 1780 he was the companion of young the guest of the Prince of Wales and author of Tom Littles For the latter he was so sternly rebuked by the editor of the burgh hostile meeting was the con sequence which the poet and critic both When the Prince of Wales became he his and turned a cold shoulder on many ofhis early companions Moore was a it is and resented it in a of In person the poet is dresses has a lively and bustling aud is kind and He is an Unitarian and believes that he has one of the best wives in the Wilson is a native of and was born in In person he is the noblestlooking of all our poets in company he is companionable and eloquent never hesitates to do a good deed to a deserving or give the young aud the meritorious a lift on the road to He is a foe to all either in dress or He is the Christopher North Blackwoods KIRKK born in and died before he reached Bloomfield was born in taught to read and then apprenticed to a in whose service a love of verse came on the first fruits of were The Far mers He died in and found no one to relieve He was a modest and amiable Gordon Lord Byron was born in London in 1788 his father was a spendthrift and a and his mother an who paid as a penalty for her illplaced her whole save some two hundred a which this de scendant of princes educated her only and maintained her Between the poet and a lordship many lifelike people stood but by the time be had half completed his relations were removed one by till at last the title de scended to and he found himself lord of New His marriage was unfortunate Lady Byrons family were Methodists from the moment of his marriage his muse was silent his creditors were not so three executions iu this proud mans house invaded his studies and hurt his temper his uuder pretence of a journey to the forsook He died at and was buried at after being refused admission into Westminster Bysshe Shelley claimed de scent from u family of old standing in England he was born iu the year 17J2 acquired all know I ledge on which he set his heart with great and would have finished his education in had he not been obliged to retire from be cause of his religious On quitting col he married a young of whose beauty he was enamoured his love was unfortunate she died Whatever sorrow Shelley felt at her was not lessened by the rigour of the which deprived him of the society of his because he believed not all that the church He perished in a storm on the coast of and his body was and the ashes placed in an Keats was a native of and was born in 17DG he received a good educa when chose the profession of a He gave early indications of courting the and when under published Endy The Editor of the Quarterly Review hap pened to be looking out for a when the works of Keats To his there was no other mode of reply but a horsewhip or a brace of pistols and Keats had courage fit for anything but long before the review a consumption had begun to sap the functions of and the young poet in the homely but expressive taken death to A warmer climate was and he went to Italy but the sunshine and balmy air of that wrought no Keats drooped and and was buried in the strangers as consecrated earth must not be polluted with the dust of a HENRY CARY is one of the first scholars and worthiest men of the and for a small salarif which even Hume would desire to takea a subordinate charge of books ia the British FELICIA one who desired to do a good deed to the offered fifty pounds for the best poem on memorable conference which ensued between Wallace and after fatal fight of There were many compe titors j the Muse refused her effectual aid to any save and enabled her to carry away money and the LETITIA ELIZABETH is young in and lively without Cowper was noble ex and counted in with Lord Chancellors and Earls he studious in fond of and was bred to the The latter years of his life were clouded and He lived long bereft of reason ajad though now and then favoured with glimpses of returning his under standing was never wholly He and and so retiring and that he regarded strangers with He was born in and died in Burns was on the banks of near the old kirk of 1759 his early years were spent in tail too severe for even his vigour of body he threshed in the held the plough before he was fifteen nor when he grew up to manhood did this drudgery promise to end in ease and com He imputed first inspiration to the loveliness add simplicity of a young who reaped in harvest by his drew forth his first song and his latest was addressed to a haughtier and higher to had qnce yain poured out the richest incense the muse had to While his father he wrought under his direction and when he he wrought with the same diligence to support his mother and his brothers and but for his Barren bad bad united to render his toils unavailing his became his and he eaw nothing better for him than to emigrate to the West under a kindlier endeavour to mend his Before his how he determined to publish his poems and They were very He was invited to where Blair called him Lowland Burnet took him to his where he drank wine out of bottles wreathed with in the manner of the ancients and the Duchess of Gordon took his arm she walked from the drawingroom to the supper He stayed for nearly a whole year in and retired in anger to Nithsdale tookthe farm of EUieland from Miller of Dalawinton i married Jean and resolved tobe prudent and required more attention the poet was disposed to bestow on it he resigned it ac cepted a situation in the and lived in the hopes of rising to the station of But his hopes of preferment were blasted and he never held up his head He died in the summer of more of a broken heart than of any other In Burns was well and and of such strength and that few could match in the toil husbandry His forehead was his hair inclining te his visage very his eyes and and his voice deep and Crabbe was born in the year at in Suffolk received a classi cal education at Cambridge studied surgery with the intention of practising not turned his thoughts on the He was meek and affectionate gentle and generous gavelargely to the poor followed them from his when servants had repulsed and made amends both with tongue and The Sunday School was his favourite place of resort j he loved to sit and listen to the children and who desired to see the venerable usually went there between seven and eight in the evening such visits were To a friend who called towards the close of his he pointing to the 1 love them much and now old age baa made me a fit companion for He 8th in the 78th year of his   

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