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London Pues Occurrences Newspaper Archive: January 30, 1747 - Page 1

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Publication: London Pues Occurrences

Location: London, Middlesex

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   London Pues Occurrences (Newspaper) - January 30, 1847, London, Middlesex                                Numb. i CCLIRRENCES Krom SATURDAY January the 30th, to TUESDAY February rhe 2d 1747-8. ^fM,!0fnoifc here, we dunk ourfelves oblig d reentry refers fome ex crafts from it. t0 ?'ve^M Apo^y tot the conduct or a late ^br'ted feca at which time I' V^Ste^MTrifcr. from the year ,7�?. ^rfL heco^mencd courtier, till within -      ^rftoSth. in 174*, &c Written by weeks < Hotelf. , his papers. ?gin their preface jo this Jhofe who nave been bell acquainted with the late Mr. W - n, will readily perceive him to have be^n the Author of the following Apo-1 logy} every line of it fo far wears L%nr, as to be a proof to all thofe who had any of his expreflion and wav of thinking. H it thus v * We take the hint of oar title ,rfr authors manufcripr, where we found tbefe an ayology for my'conduct in Parliament, and jfo-to intii e as we a/S x it. Thus mueb we thought The cBthor begins his apologv thus: Though I was ever an enemy to the innate, aliumufe iiuty of a neighbouring nation, which had occafion� it inundation of memoirs, of which the world has jJained in thefe larger days; yet am of opinion n there mav be, at all times, men who- might be i  Deceit and Hypocnfy are woven m the nature of man, or at lead into his prac-s, that there is no forcing any judgment of him, t by bis works > and even theie are often found in. idean How often i* a man obliged to act feeming-agdnft hk judgment and "principles, in order to ar-n at fare romt, however diftant; which h? may few himfelf at his firft fettiugout in the world ? fa when mer i'i to mink, befor - I was capable of reBeclion. Yet ice, (hong as it might have been, vas opt erce enough to prevent my examthing the depth juftiee ot the rr'mcir-les, that had been inculcated eaify, and fo carefully.' And kaving told us of his havinfc examined the stives, the juftice, the neceflity and expediency of heavotetion:. he fcvs, ' I could evide-tly gather wi books and men of all parties, that thofe who had (thc earlier and principal ibtreio the conduta of that jdighry atFair, had no view to fuch a change as hap-rP^ped. nor rarended to go fuch lengths, as they were : led into alien* ards- Here I paufed a while, to fee*if JffiiSht not re!r where fo many great men had taken ^mt .land, even while the fcheme was yet frelh and teelofed, And I freely confeisto have thought this � paly a Jhugele, in favour of the old confrfcution. to be a wcit difap: robatioh of the new meafare, and UiihoBoarto tfcofe, who had Ihamerolly yielded to W aUureqjcac; of prefent favour and power, after tteyJud fkiced on the other jfide cf the queffion.  Then he acquaints us with die regard tie had for &s�defcxfo�iA, 9nd the pains that nobleman took tocufovtte his,underi!and]Bg: * The method he took, ys ne, tvajto fet before methe nam re and crcettetxx �tir�nftkution, as jt food before the great event 2ftL3�nt ^^fid^ioO' He would ofwn compare tt^prefintwith the former flate of the nation, and* fj*f ftere his descriptions; as gave this the pre. that j bat if in thofe early days, after die , "*%i.he found reafon for fpeaking more advantage-j B^ffornier than latter timevwb4t,wooI�l we have �m.tfhehal lWed in thefe days-of oar#, when the �wwof our taxet, annually, alntoft eqdab tl^Mn-. ^<� wheavefl*;ity and inSfcw-JJ^not only, generally pra&iied, bat paWddy r^^ifying bis ancle the earl of Oxford, he at ^ ti� not  nly that Minaie^bot the fate Lord n^�natt>uke of K^T.-.b, tfae late garLof. �Wefe*Ae rewAjdoib have had a conHttt wem *5LK�vjry of the coofetiottj Tt�k he had T m�T for:tirittg out tthe cation JtokjT ^ WOal* rf *�a^�,&>thelrdwit � ft ^ch of his fcheme, was to corrupt �wm at the pcvple geawaUy^ in order to seats an indifference in them towards religion and pofreri-ty. A di/regard for the latter would, plunge than naturally into profusion and luxury, which would nec.1-lariiy huary on poverty and despair , and a difrclifh for religious worlhip in general would render them left anxious and avene to tbeie religious Tenets, that had given the bell colour for the late change in the ' coaftitution.' As he fuppofed rhis to be Sir R--t W-^-fc's Plan, he lays, he inclined to join him die nil Day he came into Parliament, but it was two- years after- be. fore he could get over his fcruptes of leaving the party > he had firft embarked with: and the firft debate in which he appeared, in his-new -Sphere, was that concerning the treaty of Seville, which-, as it was a mea-, fcre neceflarily pfodaclive of brangks and expence, , was intirely confident with hn plan. Then he tells as, tbat the Day after the Grand De-bate upon this Sub;ecli Sir R-t>as pkafed to k'.cA him for his EvenirigCofflpaaion and �dds as follows * After he SSr R-c, had pa�d torgeCompBinenrj on the Glory, as be phrafed it, I had acquired the Day before, be asked me with an Ait of great Serioofhefs, what were my private Sentiments of a Meafur�, I had fo well defended in Publick > As I believed the Qnef-tion to be pur parpofely, to flimiih aft Opportunity Foe an Eclaitcigement on both fides, I made no He-fttation to avow- my difapprobarjonof rt, as being pregnant with future Squabbles and Diuentions. ' 1 am mr/taken, laid he, fmiiing. or yon would not have been fo eloqent, jn praife of the Treaty, if you had thought it conducive to the real Inteteft of the prefent Family,--I replied immediately, that the Welfare of the Community being the firft and chief Objecl of my Attention, I tried every Meafure by the Touch-Stone, and that as I looked on the Treaty in qjefti-on, to be in its Confeqoences, a Meafure defrrudbve of that Welfare, I tacitly dilkpproved of it without con-falting how much or how little the Incereft orthe Family was concerned- And I added, that however the nature of his employ might oblige farm to fubmifltoo, I did not doubt oat he had, as myfelf, the publick good ever and chiefly in view. lie the Knight took me by the Rand, dying,' Mr. W-n, ym are more deeply difcemmg ror your Years than any one of oar modern Youth; and J am pkafed 1 was not mifeken In my canton of your fecret motive for leaving yonr party, end coming over to . us, without being fought fo earaefHy after, as you , might jaftly have expSaed,   Yon perceived, I lup-pole, or thouaht you did the tendejney of my cohdoct, ami immagined a fimilitude, which inclined yon to cooperate with me in the favourite Undertaking. Yon ; arc not miftaken, continued he, in yoar opinion of my ; private fentiments,oor in your.cbj^eiSaEes' of the true motive ofmycofttacV 1 may not live, or continue in power     enough to p^fect my fcheme; hut am fare to lay foch a foen-Jntion, W toy forttflbrsmay buiid upon with certainty, and "cbmpleat the worK-Tis probabfc, faid hej yon wHl be that firifher; and I fiheerery wife you ftay for the publick gdod. For , ftooM P-y or C--rt, from fte ef&�s of the prefent oppofition, focceed to my irrftuence, I cannot anfwer tbeV wH tufffae my plan. And ^fbr P-m  the ljkeijeft mwifext youffelf. if the opposition, prevails not, whatever his^mv^relentrrents concerning the old conftirotionmay be, for I never had confidence enough in him, to rtufthirti ft^rnlneyhe Has not pans eqral to fo arduous an trndertakihg, arid' therefore I fhoakl fufpect the glorious work woxddlSiuicariy is his hands, even tho' his brother ihouM co-operate1 with him j who* by the bye, has a better underftanding, tho' much conrufed and he be lefs laborious. I cannot fay what the D-*s difcemment (and let me fay that his judgment is more folid, when 1fe a&rds himfelf leifare lor &rious re Section, than is commonly imagined) and Idve of his Coontry may prornpt him tpjtradtcV in &vobt of the dd a�iricatiootb�t am weUaSured faerwas neither bred not bant asyou and ; I were.vvitb. fensimencs .in its ftvowv As for P^y-< bisthirft for wealtbiocciaj ies his q�nd. too m*ch to; | leave room for other cMfidtat&flefts^efpM*^ if*t-tefdeo with rifqne ajid danger. He dreads wo much theonafeqnencp of pibUck confofioiu toijcu^sn the I recovery of thf;oW �on(Utation, tWt AerfoSdity -of | his underfbmdihg might inform bun the- attempt would bedigiblev 1      , I, If eyet C^r-r-tftould be mvefM witfe sower, he will take a direct contrary path w the deftriefcGc&J* tha$ ytw^I,W^Bid.-chtile. And is mean as Opinion as X have of rhr Man's Virtue, I beoeve he thinks aad wiffaes � we do v therefore woakl be forrv he � would be built on War and Coo. produdnf f�h ESefls, as of ^ �SW�I4c*^��^ rf�ati0ver.acnMke5 ^KSirft-t't^br anight htyebe hr opened the and weal�Bt*d our nariniUay, tilt ' ed^tf JSinds of our hen^ita^~En�nies, the French. &tt o� the  it Jealbofy of tho Gt rman Princes, particularly of b,is P-^n Maje.ry, has all aloa increafed, in proportion to the Influem t, which this Crown was fuppofcd to have gken to t e Electorate in the Empire.. Is it not percervable, el r fince the breaking out of the ^dtent Troables on he Continent, that .all our M�r fures, tor the fupp t of the Houfe of Aufrrw, were drAerdjreftly oppofe', or indirecHy Wogged bv the other powers of the 1 npire, upon fio other principle but that of Independt cy ? An Increafe of the power of the Hpufe of Auftrj has been no lefs dreaded, than an Addition to that of t e Houfe of H---^. No>- do I tfiiri the Pruffian jife jufy of the Hemic of A i!rriay on Account of Silefia, t. exceed that of the Houfe 0t H-r, on account >f the Diadem of tflefe KiXg- doms. .    '   , The King of Pruffia w uld naturally, I mas^fav ne-cef6rily, be at the Head, f the Pit>d!2a�rTntere!r in Gettnany, if this Crown iid not add fo ranch greater Lu lire and Weight 4 the El^ome of H-rl than may be confiflent wi S the Views oi 19 Neigh-boors. And I am not /ure, but the Court'of. Bjeriin might bid fair for orefcrib . g even to the C^rholickj of the Empire, now the Ho ^fe of Ai'tria. is on; the Decline, if the mighty Weigli of this Crowti had Been out of the Scale. For th& h afon, is there the Shadow of probability, that our ^refent Irraggfes, on the Continent, can be attended v. ith Giccefs ? Could we pufh ttie French, even within their own Limits, by fome lucky Event, which does 1 ot feem very prdoabte, I make no doubt bat P -1, who feesH      "t~ as we?l' us Anftria with jaund.o-dEyes, would drop the mask of Neutrality, audi ar v, openly in their Favour. Nor an I iiire that his prefent p ".f+r- r,a Majefly would haye any regard^ to the fafety of the: Dutch as might induce him to interfere in their Favour. He. then tells as, that Sir R--1 and he differed in their fentiments apout the match with the Prince off O-  without^thinking better of our fpi ritual Guides, tftan fh?y deferve. How have rhey merited, the At-. tffefon, pf ^Apptobation of Men of Senfe and Candour^ Chnjrcnnien, before nay time, may have had fome Title to the Efteetn of the people , but lincfi I had any Knowledge of Men, the Clergy have brought the C--hiri2fintoC-1. Sdthatif.iiy Lord     ;-- mould be weaned from his Veh^-ration for the Chdrch, as, well as many others, let them, who have bee^ r^ prtrary Caufr, talpe fhame to themfelves and h^Ampti. Apd^^Jt^e^ %tber he fys : This dininfiuilhta ^obierran h# &eh lately takai iotd the MinilTy, bnt it is^?Q�b>a/ti�eof fubdndinarion, as his hi^i friHt xfi^ijeter}�6^[,jfM.bai net fuch patriot Views fel^rJelf paAtl and ffill have in taking (hare in the <^,#IcpsiBack Af^Irs, fot,fi�e CoWpletTou of my faVonr^Knerne. One Man in, is worth a Dozen &x 6ft^ter|^ifie r4jrpdfe of polhing things to Extremity, whjca alone js the Way tdthe old Cc^tution.' i^alkt^efinther&adistfius: ' In thisLigTit Totefider the truly great Man, lately come into the Miniffay. Is it not obvious that he mufi have lome fuch patriot'View, in accepting of Power fo dTtertt fipoarCoort^ Whf dfe but *y pave his funher Way for the gforiotfjj parpofe cif f rving bis Country, effen-tially, has b^ilaid lueh reftraint on his a�5Kve .Mind ? Generous Mfjtive ! Nor dd I defpair in �he leaff. but fe 4rifl prove himfelf the unfhaken Friend to the old CbMirotfob I take bin for, when he reaches dwt fumrd^ cf tower, which wuTenabldi him torstethe iepdini^be Adrftfcifrration. As all tr-e great leading ]^ face die Revolution, had been fcret Ftietrfs to tint ^eredr ftmdarni-as all die wife and virtuous fince that perkSd* have bewbnweaaed in their attention td that fihgle point, why flwuld we deabt the y.--e R-TV's patr'ot Views, who fo brightly bjs Cotetnporaries ?   

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