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Guardian Newspaper Archive: April 25, 1900 - Page 1

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Publication: Guardian

Location: London, Middlesex

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   Guardian (Newspaper) - April 25, 1900, London, Middlesex                                NO. 2838.-[    tinder 6ob.    ] WEDNESDAY,  APRIL  25,  1900. Price ......Bd. principal Contents The Week................................................................ 581 Foreign News...................................................... 581 The War in South Africa.................................... 581 Eaclesiastical......................................................... 584 Leaders- Pbkachino Under Modebn Conditions............ 586 The Austbalian Commonwealth Bill ............ 587 Home News......................................................... 5e7 The Queen's Visit to Ireland........................... 588 Norwich Diocesan Conference........................ 588 Education............................................................... 589 National Union of Teachers....................;............ 590 William Cowper................................................... 593 Beviews- Shaw's History of the English Church......... 593 Maspero's Passing of the Empires.................. 594 Knowles's Kipling Primer.............................. 594 Jevons'b Evolution.......................................... 595 Arnold's Passages in a Wandering Life ...... 595 Drama and Mu"sic............................................. 595 Notices; Novels.................................................. 590 Quarterlies; Guide-books; New Editions; Pamphlets; Notes................................................... 597 Canon Gore's Lent Lectures.............................. 598 Correspondence- "Wo and all Thy Whole Church;" Prayers for the Dead; The Recital of the Athanasian Creed...... 600 "The Code of Honour among the Clergy;" Reading and Pronunciation; Poor Preaching; Tithe Assessment; Rochester Diocese (South London); "Mass of the Preeanctified"........................... 601 Communion in One Kind; St. Georjje; Factory Legislation; Irish Children in Phoenix Park; Natal Clergy Distress Fund.............................. 602 In Momoriam- Samuel Andrew................................................... 602 Lewis Woodward Lewis....................................... 602 Charles Tiekell Procter................................... ... 602 The Next Church Congress .............,................ 003 Advertisements................................................ 591,603 a UEEN VICTORIA CLERGY FUND. CONTRIBUTIONS to the above Fund will be received at the Office of the "Guardian," and all euch Donations, however small, will be acknowledged in our columns. THE   WEEK. a misunderstanding of instructions by some subordinate. The Duke of Argyll, whose deuth at the ago of seventy-Mr. Long seems to disclaim that theory, and we must seven was announced yesterday, will be remembered less take the act to have been deliberate. Why was it? as an ex-Cabinet Minister (though ho attained Cabinet Despatches of this kind do nob get themselves printed and rank at twenty-nine, and was three times Lord Privy published in the ordinary course of official routine. Their Seal, once Postmaster-General, and once Secretary for appearance in newspapers is so exceptional that possibly India) than as a man who, born to a great position, no parallel could be found during the last fifty years, devoted the labours of a keen and restless intellect to the Some one must have specially interested himself in the discussion of numberless problems, both speculative and matter. From a military point of view the publication is practical. The Duko was too independent a man to be a entirely bad, and it is difficult to see any counter-balancing successful politician, and his father's death mado him a good from the civilian standpoint. It mny natter the less member of the Houso of Lords at the ago of twenty-four, intelligent section of the public, but it has caused grief Ho was a man in whom the perferviduvi ingenium of his and indignation to all those whose opinion is worth country was combined with a real gift of oloquenco and having.  Meantime Sir Redvers Buller retains his com maud in Natal, but Sir Charles Warren is said to be reverting to a semi-civil position as Administrator of British Bechuanaland. At the Norwich Diocesan Conference the Bishop of Norwich devoted a large part of his address to the subject of Clergy Pensions and Clergy Sustentation.   Such a choice of subject may no doubt provoke sneers from enemies of tho Church, who will represent tho clergy as absorbed in tho discussion of loaves and fishes.   But the Bishop was quite right, and his experience is peculiarly valuable.   Ifc may not be generally known that in the diocese of Norwich there are far more parishes ihan in any other diocese-906, as against 018 in Oxford, which conies next.   And though there are-or were-a few " fat livings," there are a largo number/or which " lean " is too mild an epithet-230 under 200?. per annum, of which 169 are under 150?., and fifty-nino under 100?.   No wonder thufc, under these circumstances, " quite a proportion of " the clergy are practically bankrupt at the time of their death." Wo have got to face tho truth, which the Bishop put before his conference, that in a largo measure endow ments can no longer  bo considered as anything but auxiliary.    There is no remedy but almsgiving, and systematic almsgiving is a duty which is imperfectly understood and insufficiently urged, whilst many clergy who preach it as a general obligation are shy of asking for money for themselves, even though it be collectively, not individually.    There is plenty of room for different schemes; the Clergy Pensions Institution is excellent, as far as it goes, but pormanent augmentation of benefices and grants to meet cases of individual distress are also Apathy is the cause of the present distress, Parliament reassembles on Thursday, and we have spoken elsewhere of the most interesting subject which awaits it. The rumours of an early dissolution have received a check I sorely needed from the statement made by Sir Michael Hicks Beach last! and it is due, wo hope and believe, moro to ignorance and habitual reliance on endowments than to any rooted indifference or deliberate acquiescence in the starvation of Thursday that he was quite ignorant when the dissolution will take place. We do not suppose Lord Salisbury him self knows any more. There must, of course, be a certain temptation, if any great successes have been achieved in the war before the end of July, to dissolve then in order to reap a party advantage by a " khaki " election. But we hope and believe that Lord Salisbury will show himself superior to such a motive. When things have reached a state in which a final plan for the settlement of South Africa can be devised there will be a real reason for obtaining tho verdict of the electors. Until things are ripe for this the present Parliament will probably continue, even though it is somewhat blase, and, especially if the summer proves hot, will add but little to the Statute-book. Sir Henry Fowler's address to his constituents at Wolverhampton last week was marked by the same masculine good sense and healthy contempt for catchwords which made him so successful as Indian Secretary. We are glad to find him speaking strongly of the necessity of imposing a heavy tax on the gold-mining industry in the Transvaal to pay some part of the expenses of the war. The terms of settlement which he proposed are in [ practical agreement with those suggested by Bishop Webb in our columns a fortnight ago-the absolute supremacy of the Queen, equal rights for all white men, the widest possible self-government, and provision for the just and humane treatment of the natives.  Sir Henry Fowler quoted a striking passage from one of the Midlothian speeches, but we do not think that Mr. Gladstone can rightly be claimed as a Liberal Imperialist.   His actions certainly tended to the restriction rather than to the development and strengthening of our empire. We shall, perhaps, know some day how and why the confidential documents relating to the Spion Kop disaster were made public. The Government as a whole is responsible--that of course. But there was just a hope that the scandal might turn out to have arisen through a mistake, [FIRST 8HEET. the clergy. The India-office has published the papers relating to use of consecrated garrison churches in India for Presbyterian and Wesloyan services.   The decision which has been arrived at is satisfactory to Churchmen, as Dr. Welldon has secured the adoption of his suggestions that the application of the new rules should be confined to Presbyterians and Wesleyans, and that in cusp of dispute the appeal should be not to tho local Government or to the Commander-in-Chief, but to the Metropolitan.   We believe that with a little tact and charity cases of difficulty need seldom arise, and that they have seldom arisen, but it is another thing that the use of a consecrated church should be claimed as a right, nor is a military officer, or even a civilian Governor, a satisfactory arbitrator on such a point. The May meetings are beginning even before May has arrived, the Church of England Temperance Society and the S.P.G. leading the way this wreek.    Both these societies meet this year under circumstances of special interest-the former for the first time after the publica. tion of the reports of the Licensing Commission, the latter for the last time before the commencement of its centenary.   We are afraid that many societies will have to tell a tale of diminished receipts'owing to the diversion of charity into channels connected with the war.   More interesting than the announcement of any meeting is the notice that the Archbishop of Canterbury will give his decision about reservation on Tuesday next (St. Philip and St. James Day), May 1st, at 11 a.m.   We cannot tell what that decision may be, nor do we claim that it should be beyond criticism, but we earnestly trust that ifc will be loyally received and obeyed as the only decision  of spiritual authority possible under present circumstances, and therefore the only alternative to confusion and self-will. I subtle dialectical ability. His knowledge of scientific and philosophical thought was singularly wide, and ho approached tho thorny subject of tho relations of science and religion with the double qualification of a scientific investigator and an earnest believer. His Reign of Law and Unity of Nature wore books which, though they were severely criticised, wero acuto and suggestive attempts to grapple with real difficulties and fearlessly to maintain forgotten or unpopular truths. Absolute fearlessness was ono of tho finest traits in a noble character. The annual conference of tho National Union of Teachers was held lust week at York, and it is stated that not fower than 42.000 teachers wero represented. The president, Mr. Jackman, dovotcd most of his address to tho question of Security of Tenure for Teachers, and fell foul of church and chapel, of school boards, and voluntary managers. But he showed an inclination to treat exceptional cases as if they were typical, and tho consequences of the alternative to insecurity-the assimilation of the teacher's tenure to that of civil or municipal servants-ought to bo fully faced. Tho conference proposed, with regard to the new education authorities, to establish School Boards under anothor name and to invest thorn both with tho rating powers possessed by tho present School Boards and tho control of tho " whiskey money " which is enjoyed by County and Borough Councils, whilst they would have authority over schools of every kind. Tho proposal has a certain attractiveness from its simplicity, but tho timo is not yet ripe for tho creation of tho county education authority, and when it is created we hope that it will not bo a "glorified school board" elected ail hoe, bub a composite board working in organic relation with, and subordinate to, County and Borough Councils. Wo havo to aim nob at increasing, but ab diminishing, the number of elections and of rating authorities in our system of local government. A Parliamentary return was issuod last year which gave elaborate information as to tho employment of nearly 150,000 children who wero, or ought to have been, attending school.   The actual number of wage-earning school children is no doubt much higher than this, and tho Committee on Wage,Earning Children, of which Sir Charles Elliott is the chairman and Mrs. F. C. Hogg the hon. secretary, has been doing a valuable work in calling attention to tho subject.   Ifc is quite obvious that the selling of newspapers, or flowers, or matches, in the streets of large cities by mere children is open to grave objection on tho score both of health and of morality, whilst in many cases it makes education a farce.   What can be expected of a girl of five who delivers milk for thirty-five hours a week, or a newspaper boy who sells papers for 100 hours (the figure sounds incredible)?  Here, as in so many other cases, it is not so much the law which is at fault (though there is room for improvement) as the administration of the law.   Many School Boards, attendance committees, and magistrates have very unsatisfactory ideas as to what employments interfere with the efficient elementary instruction of children, which, under the existing law, they are entitled and bound to protect.   They generally content themselves with preventing children from working during actual school hours; they ought to prevent, and could prevent, them from working out of school hours in such a way as to impair the efficiency of their education. If tho committee can secure this point they will stop a great source of educational leakage and will put an end to a prolific cause of evil. dFovttQti anfr (ftoloutai. THE WAlt IN SOUTH AFRICA. (By our Military Correspondent.) Not long ago, in speaking of that ever-prominent subject the want of horses at the front,. I pointed out the dilemma.  It the   

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