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Gazetteer And New Daily Advertiser Newspaper Archive: January 3, 1766 - Page 1

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Publication: Gazetteer And New Daily Advertiser

Location: London, Middlesex

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   Gazetteer And New Daily Advertiser (Newspaper) - January 3, 1766, London, Middlesex                                The Gazetteer and Daily J A N U A R Y is Lviner and Calender patent watch for ihowing the tbe and of the titeinuts Lid by John Mallett joiftt pjusntee with ttolate Sanderfon In Albansnfew nearBartholoioewclofe They ajre alfo fold by the and at the inLondoii by and in Bath in Oxford in Verk Page and in Norwich in Newcaftle in the New in Edinburgh and Clejnents in v Imported by PAUL facing South in the ou Diftionaire des misen ordre par Di derot Sc tomes volumes Recueil de Planches fur les les Arts libe les Arts fervant a rEncyclopediej aveclears lliefe tlevtn volumes do complete this valuable Lorry de Morbis Obfervatioofi fur par Auteur 3e rEflal fur r Obferwrtions fur les Pettples Barbares ont hft bite les bords du Danube du Pont afcec la Relation Voynge a a par Tralfi des en forme de par de a Biftenre des ou Mcmoires de Dun i Soireelle Hiftoire la Fonda la jufqua la Paix en i763Jpar Des 6 Effaifur 1e Patriotifme Anglois fueiile diun Homme de Adelaide du aFfljwsrirew Sy in for the moft and valuabU CATA UE of in all languages and ef finale and drawingst by the greateft makers containing above ONE in elegant being the li braries of James and his brother the eminent for their collection of botanical ancient and books of medals the Admiral Leftock of Walthamftow William Efq Serjeant at Law Al derman Bickenfon the Edi tor of Plutarch Samuel Efq one of the Benchers of the Society of GraysInn and the afternoon preacher to the faid As the CATALOGUE will be very large and and but few espies the Prg ftiettrIxopes the will not be offended at not receiving it as ufual and to prevent ate falling into the hands of fuch who never intend to be the price of it will be Jbil for which a printed receipt will be given which will be allowed in any or the money returned on tiie delivery jf die Receipt Cata A of five per fir five pounds Un per cenL en ten fifteen per on twenty and en payment of ready The manuscript fermons of a learned are to be difpofed being a courfe for the wrote in bis very Tbh Jay is price bound Dedicated to the Right the Lord Warkworth THE ENTERTAINING in French being a collection of above 500 judicious fmart and fhort extracted from the bell French and particularly from the celebrated books in ANA The whole forming a treafure of moral and of far greater benefitJo learners than the Dia logues ufually given in By L O C K M A Author of the Hiftory of and Reman Hif by Queftion and Printed far in the The very favourable reception this work meets with in our makes all farther re commendation of it This Day price A New being the with confiderable and adorned with the Head of Ben finely BEN JOHNSONS JESTS The WITs POCKET COMPANION Being a new col lection of the moft ingenious j diverting pleafant fmart fmart wife witty and ridiculous which are A choice collection of upwards of 400 of the newett belt enter taining fatirical humourous epi facecious merry jovial Here glowing and fenfe With and fancy The poignant In pleafing garbs Their univerfal halm To recreate the ploomy Printed for at the and Crow at the Looking in Paternoiterrow and fold by all other bookiellers in town and This Day ere f TOWAGES and TRAVELSin the V in the years 52 Containing Obfervations in Natural Agricul and Particularly the Roly and the Natural Hillary of the Written originatty in the Swedifh language by tbe FREDERIC Publiihed order herprefentMajefty theQueen of mth an ef the By ShC H A R L E S L f WIT U Phyficiantp the and Member of all the learned Societiefe in 8 pricebound A KEY TESTAMENT Giving an Account of the feveral their their and ef the and OQ whtehthfiy were refpeclively With an tntrtxliiMion en or Parties alluded to in the GofpeU Printed en writing ip a neat pocket price fewed bound Printed Davis aad oppofite GraysInnHolborji y is price The carefcully corrected and im to which is intereft in ta a fhortec method than any yet publiflied from oneipound to ten at andfixffter cent of VADEMECUM the neceiTay I Pocket 5ir Samuel Morelands perpetual adapted to the new readily hewing the day of the moveable and or many years and to to the year inclufive with many ufefnl tables pro per and rules to find The fame ad apted to the old Directions rtlating to the purchafing and meafuring of remarkable in a and a table ef ex The years of each Kings from the Norfoan ionJueft to this for every in what is to be done ia the and fewer The and coins wherein iaaUfcfeof the afliieof A table wherein or fliil tinf ivereMy caft up j ef great ule to all traders f The roteiScJl rebatfw money the forbear purchafe of The both inland and ac An account jf the principal roads in Tfce MIWS of tlie count botxMgh in Wfth the attaiber of Knights of Ciri and Surgeffijn chefen therein to ferve In par and authorized rates or and Ta and half Bald nd the letters Signed A and loft the OUR correfpondent of menting on mine of the zjd of tkefame is pleafed to pre tend that the Americans have not Yf the leaft defire af independance that they only clefire the continu ance of what they think the privi lege of manifefting their loyalty by granting their own money when the eccafions of their Princes re quire If this is how have you be guiled us Why have you gentlemen concerned in the publications of the newspapers fo far wronged the honeft Americans in your laft accounts from thence Upon this fuppofition we all ought to alk pardon of the and the authors of the public papers with the to appear on their knees in die prefence of their injured fellow fubjects of Ye have informed us that the Americans have compelled perfons acting under de putation from our Parliament to refign their offices that the Americans have plundered the houfes of our Governors that tbe rioters have convened openly and in bodies for thefe outrageous without being checked by the American Magiftrates and that their Provincial Affemblies have refufed topio tect the officers appointed under an authority from the If thefe accounts be are not theofficersof Parliament treated at outlaws in Ame and deemed unwsrthy of legal authority may we not in the ufage the Ame ricans think proper to beftow upon the officers of the the true regard they have for the au thority of that Auguft AfTembly If bullying the Parliament in this manner be not a declaration of their defire of I know not what words or actions can fpeak tnat In folently entering the dwelling houfes of private per in order to fearch for the effects of the Parlia and for the purpofe of deterring any perfon from executing the orders of be not actions which indicate the ftrongeft defires of being enfranchifed from all fubmiffion to the no man can tell the meaning of thefe proceedings arid fince the magiftratic power was not interpofed for quelling thefe we mult look on the generality of the people as infected with this unparal leled If the Americans were refolved to abide by the finaldetermination of Parliament with rcfpect tfr their their conduct would have been ac tuated by a different kind from thofe that have been fwayed by of They would have given an interimobedience if they had held the Par liament as judges of their their inten tions never to fubmit their caufe to that are wrote in fuch legible Characters that the uldeft man alive may read them without the aid of But the it are too dull to un derftani any arguments drawm from virtual reprefen tation theywill not regard that fiction in our that America lies and the doctrine of EJteppelt for fo it ought to be printed is quite iucompre henfible in Be it But do not the Americans under ftahd thefe honeft that no man can be per mitted to make an allegation contradiftory to an af fet forth in a to which he is a and under which he claims that it is iaconfiftcnt with a fair character to recede from agreements and recited in a under which any perfon holds and that no perfon caa be al lowed to departiromconditionsannexed to the nature of the holding of his If the common Ameri cans are fiifceptible of the meaneft they muft that fince the New Englanders have cepted whereby they hold New England as of Ins Majefrys manor of Eaft Greenwich in fee county of they in all queftions about the ftate of their lands in New that thefe lands lie in that manor and within the county of which Is moft certainly reprefented in Par Is not the acceptance of a con ditioned an acquieicenceon the part of the acceptor that thefe lands fhall be taken to be parcel of the manor of Eaft Greenwich If this is not the fenfe of this I wifh or any other of your correfpondents would teach me the meaning of this claufe in all the charters relative to New In the mean and till I am better I muft liok npon this argument as fo fo and fo conclufive againft the New that it cannot difcuffion among men of ordi nary good muchlefs efteemed propen matter of djfpuM among men of The queftion between the Britilh Parliament and America is whether vtny badj of men iuhateiver Jhould claim apovjer tfgiviitgnvhat is nit their and make to tbemfelvet a with their Sovereign and their conftituents of granting aivay tbe property of nubo have na re prefentatifves in that for that is no qneftion at A gang of banditti only are capable of aciing in this manner towards a tree ftate of the qneftion between England and England whether that part of Britifti America fhould or fliouhHlot be reputed parcel of the manor of Eaft and confequently ef reemed in as lying within the county of Kent and the anfwer is to be found in the affirmative in the charters of the governments which compofe New you fee that the fiction in our that New England ties ivitbin is created by the Americans their acceptance of charters with this claufe in their and cannot be further dif putedby becaufe that aflertion is grounded upon their moft folemn So much for that till lam better I mult alfo beg leave to before I end this that I am not fatisfiecl that I am in the in that and other ronmodi the from Eujlatia and Monte art too convhijive proofs that they have no tendernefs fpr their mother If their lugars came from our colonies in the would not theconfumption of thefe commodities encourage our and encreafe national revenues If they drank our would not our EaftIndia com pnny get that money which is expended in pur chafing thefe things in foreign markets And would not the as well as of be thereby with an addition to the public purf It is in vain to that the prices of fugars would be thereby encrealed at home for we all that our WeftIndian planters nufe fugars in proportion to the and that we have fugar land enough in the fufttcient to ferve all Europe and America too fo that no other con Cequence could arife from the than re fraining from thefe fave only a more extenfive cultivation of the fugar and a eonfignment orlarger duties lo our f we are miftaken in this what is that to the Americans We are too generous a people to allow of a prevalence of private intereft to public advan Let them mind the a 61 of and leave it to us to make the proper judgment where our intereft is It a melancholy that the Ame ricans alfo run into their divers covhmo dities of the manufacture of to the ruin of GreatBritain and I doubt not but thefe fmugglers are the bitter iource of the unnatural differences now fo rampant between England and America for it is monftrous to that an and an unbribed would be io violent in this af as the unruly Americans now VINDEX To the and felf contradiction of your who figns himfelf An utter Enemy to in your paper of jefn eleferves no other anfwer from me than the moit fuperlative In one part of his I am a fnam Proteftant in capable of believing any thing abfurd foever of a Tell for yw that I have written more for the Proteftant and the Church of and againft pedecu than he has perhaps ever read on thofe fub jecls and that hi acculations are as ridiculous as they are B HINTS fir ike G A z E T TE E is of that the redoubtable advo cate for lenity towards under the title ot An utter Enemy ta plainly difcovers bimfeif to be of that by a moft unwar rantable zeal without His pretended abilities appear at his very firlt fetting out in his motto for where will he find in alte rant partcm And before he gives up all thoughts of troubling your pape again which will certainly be a great obligation conferred upon your number lefs readers to inform them as to the above How the are to be altogether ac quatted of having any liand in the calamities of the great unleis he can prove that Cardinal the great and Cardinal Maza the finiiher ot that horrid were not Papifts and had not and other miflio under the difguife of every feclary then fub lifting in order to it Or what he can mean by an idle ridiculous in regard to a late whe ther true or falfe of very little confequenc to the when tlieir abfolu extended to every execrable aft of and are fo It is very confidently that Bri tannicus has changed I The Privileges of their as to their ly the law vf N refpecl to the foreign jurifts that neither an nor anyof his can be profecuted for any debt orcontract in the Courts of that kingdom wherein he is fentto re fide yet Sir Edward Coke if an Embauador make a contrail which Is good jure gen ftall anfwer for it And the truth we find no traces in our law book of allowingany privilege to Embafladors or their even in civil previous to the reign of Queen Anne when an Embaflador from Peter the Czar of was actually arrefted and taken out of his in in for debts which he had there This the Czar relented very and demanded we are told that the officers who made the arreft mould be punifhed with deajh but the Queen to the amazement of that defpotic Court diredled her Minilers to inform that the biw of England had not yet protected Embaffa dors from the payment of their lawful debts and that thejfjffore the arreft wns no oifence by the laws and that ftiecould inflict no puniflnnent upon the meaneft of unlefs warranted by the laws of To fatisfy hewever the clamours the Foreign Minifters who made it a common caufe as well as to appeafe the wrath of a new a copy of very elegantly engroiled and was fent to Mofcow as a prefent was enacted by the avrreit which had in con of the proteftion granted by her con trary to the law of and jn prejudice of the rights and privileges which Embafladors and other public Minifters have at all times been thereby pof efled and ought to be kept facred and Wherefore it that for the future all procefs whereby the perfon of any or of his dameftic or domeftic may be or his goods diftreined or hall be utterly null and void and the perfons or executing hall be deemed violators of the law of and difturbers of the public ic pofe and hall fuffer fuch penalties and corporal punifhment as the Lord Chancellor and the twoChief or any of fhall think But it is exprefsly that no within the lefcription of the bankrupt who fhall in tbe fervice of any fliall be privi leged or protected by this adt nor fhall any one be punifhed for arrefting an Emhafiadors unlefs natrie be registered with the Secretary of and by him tranfmitted to the Sheriffs of London and Middiefex that are ftriftly conformable to the rights of as ob ferved in the moft civilized countries in con lequence of this thus enfoiong the law cf thefe privileges are now allowed in the courts of common The Courts of common law have come to the fol lowing upon application on That it is not neceffary the party fliould live in the Ambafladors 2 2 When party comes for benefit of the it is not enough that he beregiftered in the Secre anes office as a but mult fliew the nature of his that the Court may judge whether he be a domeftic fervant within meaning cf the act of 2 A an ajuftice of a me ni 1 an hired a perfon who receives no a a a landwaiter at the denied the benefit ef the 31 Majlers and The party muft ferve in the capacity he was where a perfon does not execute the which be his teitimonial but only gets himfelf entered in the lift to have the bent fit of a the Court will not fuiTer To the P R I N T E THE prefent whether the American Co lonies will receive as law a Britifh Act impofinga ftamp duty on themor items to be the topic of I have read over one of the Charters granted to thefe which has been publifhed in your intelligent paper and obferve the Reddendo to his is ene fifth part of all the gold and I fhould be glad to fee by fome of your correspondents a comparative diftinctien twixt the irifh conftitution and thoie of thefe Colonies Ireland a conquered fo was TheSovereign might then have fubjected them to the laws cf But they were left to and noBntifh act impofing rates and ever eirectsd then witliin theif own The by thsir are impowered to lold lys for their internal which power lAey iiaveetr lince exerciied From this tkeie feeuis to be fgiie The Ifle of Man was granted t the Earls of Jcr by the Reddencto was a Falc3n prefented the Kinoof England at his It is well known that this a of was go verned by its own and that no Britifli law took place till at ialt the Lord of the Ills fold his it to the Crown of Britain and by a late it is annexed and I becomes fubject to Britifh laws at the fame I if K had been invaded by a foreign I the Civwn of would have thought themielves bound to have defended I The kingdom of by became part of Great but continues regulated by its own By thefe it on y s a for tieth part of aland irnpofed on Great Britain and its church government by the fame to be by a convocation or general aifembly of its Thefe articles are its Charter and I doubt not breaking through them wculd give of fence to its as well 35 the late ftamp act lias done to the The Iflesof Guern fcyandjerfey have certain rivilsges rllowed by original Giants and Charters and therefore the prefent qutftion feems to how far as well as the American could be broke thorough by a Britifh without content of thofs con E N Q u I R To th K 1 N T E THE letter in your paper ofthis figned Amor has fo much fatisfied and pleafed that I cannot forbear offering my humble thanks and approbation of it it appears to me to be written in the true fpirit of wifdom and and pro perly calculated to conciliate the prefent apparently unhappy dfferencts arifsn between us and our colo nifts 1 call them becaufe I truft they under the prefent feemingly tempe and virtuous turn out means in future of further explaining their depen and thereby creating ftronger union and fe licity to Were 1 permitted to add a hint I would that pofilbly a happy re conciliation might be brought about confidently with honour and duty to our fellou Suppofe a fufpenfion of tlie the that the to theifigrtteful acknowledgments and fhoulcfduring that time tax themfelves to the amount of the produce of the ftainp duly which has been computed at about60 or pernnmim and apply the produce to the purpofe of the This if might I a means of reconciling differences to the and to thofe able to perform fuch great fervice to thtir country it is humbly fubmitted Speedily ivill be BY the particular defire of the renowned Jemmy and his Squire A Treatife on the Ufe and Advantages of Leonoras new invented Spectacles which by long and at great the has brought torhe utmoft per Many and great are the of thofe incomparable which will be fen at large in one volume They are the bslfc fpeciiic in the world for a thtfk a wrofig   

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