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Day Newspaper Archive: November 21, 1809 - Page 1

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Location: London, Middlesex

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   Day (Newspaper) - November 21, 1809, London, Middlesex                                FVKRY MORNING AT SIX NOVEMBER PRICE SfXPENCE v BY THJS and j 1N n the Cr iu the yn uf the of MA truin i v rxl b a t o for iii L M wiiljoLC and I I DEALS and of ak t Wil Limehousc rnd yellow Nor 10 to 0 fict long p Kinks i S JIH ilcal ends Iron y it r or chim i I two rlc J i ErusscU car h t by the property of a n n YOUNG bfin uinr dire in Buiincis nf the above 1 found direrted Biibops citl FA KM TO I a small i xnd fiftvfix rj wtiiate in tiie parish of uear For of a ITau of Estate 1 d Yonth of re who a tasit for draw as in In a whrre he will he treated in I A premium will be ex D apply to Lud ti t i 2 illus in he MANNERS andCUS the and Amusc pirioJ with a 1 o ire aini Toit in 1 I and Patcrnos h by the same Lon and modern de parochial iec ar s lu ar an un otiitT rf in 1 with GL BLAS of i thr N Hr ATM M I L ami Palrruof Hi in the the tj in anj at th Tt in a Syie wit1 the French iu and the proofs fur the on to SCOTLAND and the nf riy new and most ricellrnt 1 iiii from the and Brll at reduced fares Ladjate what they we do not and I believe they are equally at a If they go to meet thf they are in danger of being oppressed rgain by superior force as they were at Talavera That day did spme credit to our but was bought at too dear a such successes would rumus with victories many a true Briton after fighting like a had to lay himsel j n like a and die upon the sand at nigh for want of provisions and Tti fact that battle served only to confirm what was knowj long man to our troops ar much superior to the soldiers are undoubtedly very and in discipline not in ferior to any in but die best of our Ge nends are not to be compared to the Marshals o It is diat at Talavera some o our BrigadierGenerals fell into die 31 st regiment fired upon die They were cer tainlyat the time all covered with but tha was not die only blunder diat It is incredible how destructive this climate i to our and it has generally die worst efrec upon the Many of the declare that they would rather be in die West for this country i so and the atmosphere so fine and that it melts our men and horses to During our campaign in in die i srng which I wrote you an account as the liflds were in we gave the cavalry grtef which kept diem very well but after when we marched into in the dry burning we had nothing for them but Indian the effect was you might trace the route by the horses dead upon the road it is just same with die diey turn and lose their I if these kingdoms are saved it will be neither by die English nor by the inhabitants it must be some lucky circumstance calling dieir enemies away to tome Other The English are much too few cbtebat legions of France and the people of Spate are unfit for wart divided without good and to appearance sinking injo that letlargT in which diey nave slept for ages and in which diey had better hare Should Spain I do not thuik we can hold out here diere ia Indeed a barrier of mountains from the river Tagus to the which could ue defended against a great as long as the jnemy cannot pass die by shut ting up the Province of covers die South of Portugal bnt as soon as die enemy can pass into the we nave no as he can dien come with case to die bank of jhe Tagus opposite From the change in military establishments in the present it is a folly for our army to at tempt any where they are exposed to the main force of Our though they make much noise while fitting when brought into the are only a small detach compared to die enemy diey are seat to meet I have often that die situation of an General in the and a French Admiral on the is nearly they rirbodi sent upon euterprizes without adequate and our plan of dealing with Allies is thejnost for an I have had opportunitir of the distressing situation of a who had to combat an enemy of superior and depend upon men whom he of there is always distrust and division in the measures of an allied army it is impossible to prevent The Spaniards just now consider I nearly as much dieir ene mies the The Portuguese are very but they are a set of poor animals of litde Im portance if Napoleon brings back his grand these countries must fall in a short FOREIGN I AS j BORO DO X BARNT3Y SCARTHING BKrGLESWALiF thr Cro the following Carriujei set tui yjin erou to i New Poet the Mull ai Uiiial lirToiis Post 1 i rb Mail every tlcx Post rv Xi MJI every at and Cheltenham j and Day every R hts BvGvoAGK jiOlLXON and POKTUGAI 1 OCTOBCH f nd ire a kind of military continue their but do have rot an inch in Njpoletm and of course pieviiil when he The vrar i picicnt much relaxed since the afiair norhinr been done nor the pnncipal Officers of our army Sir tautened on the frontier j Count the Governor of this re ceived on Saturday last the official instruction respecting the shutting of the ports and yester day it was publicly notified in the when die thanksgiving for die conclu sion of peace and die Te Deum were An armistice between Sweden and Denmark has beta to commence on Saturday die 11 General dAdlersparre goes to morrow to Elsberg to inspect its and in a few days it is expected he will risk Mar strand for the same Sir in his Majestys ship hai left and is hourly expected iti Hawk The two sailors who were under sentence to be beheaded on the 22d for die murderof die mate of an American vessel in made their escape in the night on Monday and have not been heard of Sir in his Majestys ship arrived off the Winga on Saturday last and on die following Wednesday came into Hawk where he with die ships and According to the last advices from the way of it that on die IOTI of January of this an English ship of war arrived in die Commander of which compelled die Magistrares to grant die English full liberty of which they accordingly fan proved until the 20th of when they took their On board of that ship was die noted who acted as interpreter he soon after and issued the proclama tions in favour of the which were ad dressed to die in order to seduce them from their attachment to die It is a well known dial in antient times die English carried on an important trade with Iceland but since die beginning of die 17dicen tury they discontinued their intercourse with thai Preparations are making for the reception of die Emperor in The Conqueror of the will sooit add that of die Tagos and Guadalquivir to his We are that King already tetaioated the deputation which is tn receive his august brodier on the The first affidavit he should take notice of that the proceedings frontiers of the The rebels and their diit of par proprietor ot the Theao banging s accomplices will tremble at this intelligence dieir in which affidavit was the Such a fear is the best possible homage to the genius of f hc him whom nothing can CAPO The Prefect Calafari oas published die follow ing la the vicinity of Omaga an event has oc which will have die effect to bring back the disaffected to a sense of dieir and to convince die Btigands diat death and infamy await dieir On die at three diree rover ves sels from Pareoz 105 Brigands on entered die port pf The soidisants General Captain Nazario and LwutenantAnionio landed at die head of about SO began to levy contributions and recruits in the town but at five a detacnjnent of French and of die National Guarl pf Cape dIstria came in brigandsIriahediately Three ves sels set sail without for dieir or die contributions had The Chief of diegarig and his followers seized the first fish ingboat diey Copld dieir hands but were widi French soldiers of the and the buLWJBg of the present I there was in the icatre in consequence of which a rise took on those who iseque I place in the terms oT of one shilling to make such in die and sixpence in the the halt1 only on account ot price of which was the same as and tained such seiioub no advance whatever in the gallery i liic DV tiiose The nert affidavit was diat ot but on account ot fcssion learned pi naj fired i of Capo who muzzle to Al and the soi liari was de a French of very where he resided ie An impor seized upon hich escaped with the in d where they im entrenched diemselves but they were cut to pieces by a detachmenl against xavenat lost a We dat Prompter of die and that affidavit j which he ot a that after the building of the Theatre was i mixed Ln these tumults and previous to its an ad and made vertisenlent was respectfully stating to the public the necessity of the advance in the price of admission previous to that adver there appsared in several newspapers certain paragraphs and calculated to produce clamour at the opening ot the Thea That on the 18th of September last it was opened on which occasion a great number ot persons and conducted themselves in the most disorderly and riotous they proceeded to the extent of beginning to demolish some of die doors and other parts of at the same most loudly No New Old Prices for That such proceedings were continued for five successive iu which there was incessant I gave of horns Itwas con ard the ringing of springing of tumultuous That they proceeded to the on length of tearing the covering from off the seats in several parts of die and otherwise in he not brought who did not brought foi ward Mt he screened be did not the possess such i the public would th cause he a law common tate ot fated in these It would appear i 51st of Octobei djis badge cf collected toxdxr pia not until the ot pr with the letters in peared in 1 could not sav lie could specific act r rrri tlic number ot to he of the Theatre was the very emblem recognised in the house juring the property therein in consequence uf which it was found necessary for the Proprietors j tumultuous to shut up the Theatre for a few That the cry of d during that period they by the and was remarkably mony of certain respectable to satisfy then proposed that MO the minds of those who were discontented with which passed inthe the new arrangement concerning the was done The Theatre opened again on the Jtn of tinued fen uie e That of e into attended ca the set my The S him three and it te upriar con The a lesson fosi die the die certain Holy vho no longer directthe but the ury of certain shameless men COURT OP EX PARTE A In diis which was stated yesterday in THE DAY at some Hart and Cullen were heard ojs behalf of Wood jate and Colonel m answer to die etition of the bankrupt to supersede die com It was urged that die motives which actuated these gendemen in the advice diey had given to to consent to the measure of becoming 51 originated in a iendly regard for nis and a mature consideration of of such a dieir inowledge 6T fats they ielt that they did not hazard too much in saying hat the embarrassed situation in which Mrmans affairs were placed could only be re ieved by an act of That step being determined it wanted but the consent of Firmin to pat it into The affi lavits of these gentlemen solemnly declared that Firman submitted to and seemed per ectly resigned to the unfortunate necessity of rom a conviction that it was the only means diat ould be resorted to of satisfying the demands of lis They were much more strongly onvinced of the wisdom of such a rom a regard to the state of Firmins which rendered him incapable of attending pro erly to die management of his n consequence of nis unfortunate mental situa his since the year had de reased in value and it was their per diat in the course of a very short time t would have been deteriorated to the amount of Under these circumstances they hoped the Court would not deal with them with as much severity at if their conduct had not thus been The LORD CHANCZLLOBT having heard with rreat patience die arguments of Hart and and declining to hear Sir Samuel lomilly in from an opinion that it would e he was very reluctant in ttributing any improper motives Wood ate and Masters but he must fairly bat the affidavits before him disclosed to die Ilourt such a bankruptcy he pro was one of the grossest of the ankrupt laws he ever heard The merits of ie case lay in a very short It was of tde consequence to the whether or Ot Masters and Woodgatq acted from worthy motives in their proceeding the principle pon which this commission was issued was b nd if once admitted would be productive of ie most shameful abuse of the bankrupt It which a number of persons object of his appearance was weil ur and and behaved in the most disorderly j the which it i tumultuous very having these three Not onlydid they very did on assem and tumultuous uttering the cry of No New No Private in consequence of little of the entertainments of the Theatre could be That these tumults were not so nor the parties engaged in them so conspi The affidavit in the beginning oV the and often i cheers were given to hardly commenced until the time for admission at halfprice from that such were the tumult and die that hardly any thing could be heard that was uttered on the stacje on recognise but thy mm ns and he tellinc that if they tivir they in be sure T their thai these three lemun those v hid wore at been heard to sav o g of Thats and when you the who wore the letters O that and that he those who wore this ad right go persevere i T i i So that had him these occasions a party always and emj house ployed the I di of November in this of party always wearing die initials in dieir j those who blow the and on their Frequently n the pit i their They formed themj taien notice of selves into bodies in the upper part of the dieir horns and Hitherto he had nniy rd on the of the 31st of he not hem ei and ran down to die lower part of trampling j pected there however he was upon those who did not get out of the That b die nnd he when it was necessary to call in officers of die I them DO alihouch with the they resisted I piudent cution of tl turned That this in going out of die took the out ot their and from their so that they could not be re should be gone with in of tlu r when 1 rl He was on the iud of No t l cognized or else they went in a body of such j free that they could not be apprehended by the j peace Such was the substance ot tiie j affidavit of the prompter it I that the deponent verily diat all these tumultuous proceedings were with a and for the of compelling the Proprie tors of this to continue opening it at the old These tumults were continued every night down to the present time thvt not a night past in which this uproar did not take at least at halfprice that several concerned in the were in1 termination and bills found against them notwithj standing which thee disorderly proceedings still continued that an advertisement was daily in serted in the recommending sub scriptions to support the defence of those whom they pretended to were unjustly prosecuted by die Proprietors and Managers of this Theatre diat this advertisement was accompanied by re flections on the character of John Philip Kemble who also in his that he believes a conspiracy is formed by certain per He thin carnc to the against whom he of rthcr per were and With respect to RiJky they had no proof about t lie was at hcThe atre one Ltnd that the Jlst of Oc tober but in his and he made a great conducted bciore a conkised that he had in his said he would do it Here a mam test de to With to t ci an active and been amidst die tumult on the 1fst and 14th of t inted puiiitea part in tic riotous was encouraging the rioters pori one wlicli placard riotous sons and that the wearing of die letters j particularly these i i 1 1 O tU 1 is their signal to know each to take these measures for die prrpose of compelling die Pro prietors of this Theatre to return to the Old Prices of The nextaffidavit upon which diis motion was that of James Boxkeeper of the That affidavit that from time to a great number of per sons assembled distinguished from others in the by wearing the letters in their and they exhibited various such as Keep your noisy A long a strong and a pull M Conquer or The affidavit then went on to that a certain number of persons had en and ponevere and on conquer or die was a person hiving torn he was one of the most active in turning that person out of die As to it appeared by almost all the affidavits that he was concerned in these ie 28th of and The affidavits die 8th and 14th applied to and Sa stating their conduct in the lower shewing tilt the number of those en off off No newpricfi No with in their It is not said the AttorneyGe to go through the whole or the acts ot riot and tumult which took place at the time when these persons I stated gene a rally what place every from the open ing of the Theatre to the present and we have fixed on certain who we say con was of essential importance that die bankrupt tered into an agreement for die purpose of com pelling the Proprietors to restore the old prices to make themselves known to hould give his unbiassed assent to the docket truck against In this it wasclear that the consent was given by a per on incapable of reasoning for and under circumttances which entitled him to die rotection of the without attending to the other cnxumstances of die or the arguments urged in behalf of these gen he felt that he was bound to supersede the commission and to direct that all the costi ncurred in the commission and je paid by parties who were the defendants m die COURT OF KINGS COVENTOARDEN The AttorneyGeneral he took die liberty of moving for a Rule to shew cause why a crimi nal information should not be filed against per which he should for conspiring to compel the Proprietors of CoventQarden Thea to admit persons into diat Theatre at what they were pleased to call for the Xtost and continued uproar and Jot diat had ever appeared in any place of public He should state die substance of lie affidavitton xivhichthii notion was spired to carry into effect their by com binin and in order f bining and by unlawful diat thev had determined to sons tothe Theatre at die old price th IJl HC3 HJ each they adopted the letters of Some obliging the Proprietors i i i U j f thf ill of die affidavits particularized the persons who constantly went to this Theatre and assembled in the Aanner That as to the 31st of October and 14th of November the affidavits were specific concerning certain and among them was one whose name he must men tion with He should have felt great sa tisfaction in omitting his if he could he felt pain in mentioning it but he must do his duty there was no avoiding although he was a member of the learned profession to which hehad mg erto the honour to And here he coul i not help observing that it was to make the gen tleman to whom he was a defendant rn die prosecution Which he was now asking of the Court leave to institute for many people might be misled into fatal when the saw a gendeman of legal cringed in these tu multunus It was difficult to impossible to die effect which an exam ple set by such a persop might have upon a giddy When diey saw a man engaged in diese scenes of diey might imagine 51PP connected intimntely pro ceedings but thev h selected t viduali1 were the most in they appear to have Ucn uc lectdd Proprietors that proceca will be sjfrkicnt to or in the I der with that trust your Lordships a on each of thuse individuals to shew whv a criminal should not be filed against Lord Take a Pvule to shew Rule Tnomas Wright was brought into upon Habeas under die care of hib John who was by of his to have kept his brodier under SQUIB   

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