Covent Garden Journal, April 18, 1752

Covent Garden Journal

April 18, 1752

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Issue date: Tuesday, April 18, 1752

Pages available: 4

Previous edition: Friday, April 14, 1752

Next edition: Friday, April 21, 1752 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Covent Garden Journal

Publication name: Covent Garden Journal

Location: London, Middlesex

Pages available: 360

Years available: 1727 - 1752

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OCR Text

Covent Garden Journal (Newspaper) - April 18, 1752, London, Middlesex By Sir ALEXANDER Cenfor of GREAT Price 3 APRIL To be continued every T u E s DAY and i Bavium non amet tua He who doth not hate one bad kt him love a O U are I that there is nothing in this Age more fafhion than to criti cife on Shakefpeare I am indeed that there are not lefs than 200 Editions of that with now preparing for the Prefs as no thing therefore is more natural than to direct ones Studies by the Humour of the I have myfelf employed fome Jeifure Hours on that great I here fend you a fhort Specimen of my being fome Emendations of that molt ce lebrated Soliloquy in as I have no Intention to publifh Shakefpeare are very much at the Service of any of the 200 Critics abovemention I Act Scene To or not to be that is the Que This is certainly very intelligible but if a light Alteration were made in the former Part of the and an ealy Change was admitted in the laft the Seilc would be greatly I would propoie then to read thus To cr To be1 that is the That is the ilrong The Addifon in Here will I hold The military Terms which dantly point out this Whether tis nobler in the Mind to fuffer The Slings and Arrows of outragious Or to take Arms againft a Sea of Trou And by oppofing end Suffering I a Chriftiari Vir tue but I queftion whether it hath ever been ranked among the heroic Shakefpeare certainly wrote BUFFET and this leads us to fupply Man for Mind Mind being alike applicable to both whereas Hamlet is here difplaying the mod mafculine Slings and Arrows in the fucceeding is an Im propriety which could not have come from our Author the former being the Engine which and the latter the Wea pon To the he would have oppofed the or to Read therefore WINGED AR ROWS that feathered Arrows a Fi gure very ufual among Poets So in the claffical Ballad of ChevyChafe TheGreyGoofeWing that was thereon In his Hearts Blood was The next Line is undoubtedly to take Arms againft a can give no I an Idea v whereas by a flight Alteration and Tranfpofition all will e let and the undoubted Meaning of Shakefpeare Or tack againft an Arm Sea of And by compofing end themv By compofing himfclf to as he prcfently explains What fhali I do fays Shall I bufet the or hall I tack about and go to Reft 70 to fleep The and the thoufand na tural Shocks The Flefh is Heir to j tis a motion Devoutly to be To to fleep To perchance to dream What to die and to go to fleep wards and not only but to dream too his Commentators were dreaming of Nonfenie when they read this Shakefpeare was awake when he writ Correct it thus To lie to No more and by a Sleep to fay we end To go to a common Expref fion Hamlet himfelf exprefsly fays he means no more which he would hardly have faidj if he had talked of a Matter of the greateft and higheft tore And is not the Context a Defcrip tion of the Power of which every one knows puts an End to the the and indeed every Ach So our Author in his fpeaking of this very calls it Balm of hurt great Natures fecond by the inftead of fecond I read SICKEND DOSE this the Dofe which Nature chufes to apply to all her and may be therefore well faid devoutly to be wijhed for which furely cannot be fo generally aid of how can Sleep be called a true Reading is certainly Confutation the Caufe for the a common Metony When we are in any violent and a Set of Phyficians are met in a it is to be hoped the Confequence will be a fleeping I is very devoutly to be ap but feldom I at leaft by the Patient at all fuch For natural I would read Shakes indeed I know only one Argu ment which can be brought in Juftifica ;