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British Spy Or New Universal London Weekly Journal Newspaper Archive: July 9, 1757 - Page 1

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Publication: British Spy Or New Universal London Weekly Journal

Location: London, Middlesex

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   British Spy Or New Universal London Weekly Journal (Newspaper) - July 9, 1757, London, Middlesex                                h spy: JSP i8f. 0 Ri The Universal LONDON WEEKLY JOURNAL SATURDAY, July q,  175-7. Continuation �f the HisTO&Y of ENGLAND, tie. The troiibiii of E.NGj.-ANp i* the Reign of Jam�s II. , ITHIN a few boors after Charles had refigned his breath, James D."of York was proclaimed in London. One would thirik the people of England had been ftark mad, or- they would not have (offered a known papift to afceod the throne, after the irielaocholy experience of what their anceliors fuffer'd under Q, Mary. It focn appeared that the reign of James II. would not be more happy for the pro'eftants. He pre-"fenfly convinced themrthat his-little finger would be thicker than his father'^ or brother's loins , and chit .-rbitr.5ry "power in the fupreme magtfttare, and flive'y to :h- iubject, rWerejimfep3rable irons a popifh government iouuded'on hereditary right of fuceeffion. The fir ft inftance of bis defpotic Intentions, was a pro-vdamatiph to continue the payment of fuch cuilorinand -duties as were granted to Charles II. only for lite ;  ana .�?hich jajnes had no right to, unlefs granted, to him by Pt. ^u.next flep was to pnnilh Titus Oats for being an evidence *_gainfl thppapidts in the late reign, and mo(T ieverely he" Minis' puriilhed, being fp cruelly whipped, and torn, firi'd, ^tnd' impisifoned, that burning to death at a {rake would have been mercy, compared with what iie I'uffer'd.   Dan-"jftiffiel , for deferting them in the aCiir of the Rye-Jjonfe plot; was little iefs Severely handled   However, a barriftcrof Grey'slnrt. was hang'd for killing Dangerfield irf-Hoi bourn, after he hid been whipped from Negate to Tyburn* [tie had been whipped from -Jugate to Newgate tha.day before-j   That famous divine Richard Baxter was ^Ifd^rjied before the ly. chief juftice jefferies, a man fit for IrJj'e purpofes of the court, without honour or confeience, I iropodpnt ,to ihe laft degree^ and ever ready .0 faenfice troth; juftice, and the national Lotereft to recommend, him-. fdCto thdfein power.   Birter's crrme was his having pab-�Jilhed a paraphrafe on the New Teftaraenr, wherein it was pretended there were feveral {editions piffages, and highly IreflefliB^oa-the.bifljopj.^ He^was fined 500 marks, to lie in prifon till he paid it," and to find fecu-;ry for h;s g cd Tbti**rkiur -for feven years.--As James refolved not to be obftrti&cd in bis de/igns by a Pt. he refolved to get one to 'Iris mind, which he effected by caufing none bat tories to be �!ecled fo fit in the houfe of commons. This P:. paved the K's way to abfolute power, by sfligning him iuch a revenue as enabled him to govern without a Pt.  � The I); of Monmoath, the late K's baftard fon had been -baoifhed the jcingdom a little before his father's de�h. The prefent K. had ever been the D's enemy, and the latter was r�ow'rn-perpetual fear of his life.   But in order to (erure himfelf; and alio in hopes of obtaining 3 crown, the Duke refolved to attack his ancle. He was a proteftanr, anc withal idoli2ed in England, therefore he doubted not of findir.g many Friends there.   Leaving Holland with about 80 lol lowers, he landed at Lyme in the weft of England, 011 the i'ltbof June, a6S5    Here he publifhed a declare ion, aerating the Ki of all the tnifchiefs during the l�te reign, and making fuch proffer* and invitations to all that woulr join Jrim, as are nfual in papers of that kind.   He alfo affirmed .that his mother was privately married to K. Charles, long .before the princefs of Portugal : This had been reported "fp^Charles^ rime, and not a few believed it. " In" four days after the D's landing, his followers incrcaied to 2000'.   This made him hope they would continually increase as he advanced into the country.   On the 15th he removed to Axminlter, and thereby prevented the Duki- of Argylef (fon tp the famous general Monk) from befie^ing him in Lyme.   The latter had marched to Axminlter with 4000 militia troops; but Monmouth had difpofed his forces in fuch a manner,  that Albemarle thought fit to retreat, perceiving his militia-men had no inclination to fight. Monmouth next marched to Taunton without oppofition.   Here be was received with joyful acclamations , and his troops i&Cfeafirijg apace, he afiunvd the title- of K. and was pro darmed"by the name of Jarrtes II.   He next marched for" Briftol, but when he was advanced within three miles of that city, he heard hat his ancle's forces were coming after him, whereupdh he *bi.n_da; ed ^is d-fi^n upon Briftol, and marched towards Bath.   After fummonir.g chs? city in vain, he beat op one of the K's quarters at i'JhilipVN rcoft, where lay a party oj horie, which he entirely defeated.    From hence he marched to Frooro, 'where he met with a chearful reception.   Here he heard the ill news of the defeated the Earl of Argyle, who had begun to act for him in Scotland  and for which the Earl w?.s beheaded at Edinburgh.-From -JProotn the Dake marched'td Bridgew.iter, where he foori found himfelf in a manner befieged.   Thp Earl of Fever 4um lay on one fide that place, with about goco men ; many parties 01 militia were alto ftatjened thereabouts, be-ftles^^eniarle^roops.   Hereupon, the Duke refolved to ferprize Feveriharo, who then lay at Sedgemon.  Accord- ingly he began to march at eleven at Bight, with great filence, and in two hours fell in with a regiment, which a-farmed the reft of the army, and gave them time to draw op and receive their enemies. The battle was fought about day-break. The Duke's horfe, headed by the Lord Grey, -were routed at the firft charge, Monmouth, at the head of bis infantry, long fought with great bravery ; bat being de-ferted by his own, and attack'd by the K's horfe, he was at laft defeated, having 300 men flaia on the field, 1000 in the purfuit, and 1000 pri�oners. T�ro days after the battle-he was found in ft ditch, arid fent to London, where was beheaded. [Toit continued. J PLANTATION1     NEWS. BoJlony May 23. WedneOay the i'rivateer Ship Hertford, c mmanded by Cap*. Tbofnas Lewis, lately fitted out frum this Place, brought into our Harbour a valuable Prize, a Ship of about -240 Tons, which he took about three VVeeks ago, to fhe Southward of "Bermudas, in Lat. 29 .' She was bound from Porto Prince in Hifpaniola to Old France ; her Ca.-go is fiid to confift of 400 Hog{heads of Sugar, and',*confidei^.bl2 Quantity of Iiioigo. Cotton, Wood, Hides, Sic. valued at about 90CO 1. Sterling ; She failed out with four other VefTels bound to France, Which parted from hef a Dav or two before 0ie vyas taken j one of whkh is Tir.cL taken. Several French Letters found' on board this Prize, confirm the Arrival of the Squadron com.riande.! by Monf. Beautreniont, and that he had fent out two Fri-gates t-o clear the Coaft of our Privateers; but ihu the Englifh Squadioo approaching, ;they run into Porto Paix, and infb/med the Admuar thereof ; wh-1 thereupon put to Sea, and a great Number ofr Cannon were | heard for feveral Hours ; fo 'hat^we m^y cxpe�t to hear of foroe fmart Engagement.'    '- Nau-2jrk, May 30. Thurfilay and Friday laft returnedJiere ironn their Crui^s j|- the fo.lowing Privateers, ."viz. the'Ha.wk, Capt. Aijcandet ; the Cbarm-iug-.S^li'^ _.Captv Harris ; an^jfehnfon, Cap*. Grig, eacn < f 12 Carriage Guns j and brought in with them five Fie, ch Prizes, to wit, three Ships, a Snow, and a B::g, which they took  uc of a Fleet �f 27 Sail, between the 7th and i2tn inlrant off Ihe We$ Caucafcs, as they we e b-und trom Cape Francois to Bourdeaux : They were unuer Convoy of five French Men of War ot the Line, and a Fngate, when our Privateers de-fciibed them, and left the Cape but two' Da\ s before they were taken. The Ships are of 14 Carriage Guns each, are Letters of Marque, /rood a hot Engagement of (ome Houis, and our VefTels wete obliged to board them before they ftruck ; thev are at ietdt. 300 Ton?, the"Snow is about 250, and the Brig about 200 Tons, deep luaved with ^ugar, Coffee, Cotton, &c. And we hear one of the Ships has between 80 and ico.000 Weight of Indigo on board. The Whole at the lowefr Computation, is Valued at about 70,000!. Currency. Betides the above Prizes, the Hawk, a Day or two before "they fell in with the above mentioned fleet, took a valuable Schooner, bound from the Cape to Europe, and orcered her for Bermuda. Some of the Pnfoners taken in the above Prizes, fay, that the five Line of Battle Ships and Frigates, when they left the Convoy, in a certain Latitude were to proceed directly for Lpuifbourg ; and that the Greenwich Man of War, lately taken from the Englifh, was at Anchor in the Cape ; from which it is natural to think, that either Want of Men;or Provifions, render the French unable to fit her out. Capt, Lyel, arrived here Yetlerday in fix Weeks from the Bay of Honduras : ,He came out in Company with Capt. Guilford, of this Port, and off Cape Antonio, they faw 12 Sail of French Ships one ful Adlion near Kaurzim are, That the Pruffian Infantry attacked with great Bravery and Intrepecity, drove the Auftrianj from two Hauteurs which weie defended with Cannon, and afterwards attacked the third Hauteur ; but not being fupported by their Cavalry, they were flanked by the Auftrian Cavalry, and put into Diforde.*, and; fuffered greatly from the Cartridge Shot of the Cannon. The Piuilian Army remained that Night upon or near the Field of Battle, and Ycfterday retired toward? Nimburg upon the Elbe. The Aufirian Army was mod advantageoufly pofted, and covered by a very numerous Artillery, placed upon the high Grounds between Gentiz and St. John the Baptifl, we have as jet no Account of the exact Number of their Troops, nor cf the Lcfs they have fuf-tained in this Action The King of Prulfia commanded the Army, ancl expofed his Per fon to the greateft Danger. He returned laft Night to the Camp beyond the Moldau, and w$ march this Morning with the At my that lay on fb^l S;de the River; and the Armv on thi*S:Je is going (9 decamp. Prjce (by Reafon of the new additional Duty) Two-Pence.   

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