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British Press Newspaper Archive: October 24, 1820 - Page 1

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   British Press (Newspaper) - October 24, 1820, London, Middlesex                                Price 7d. THBATItK-HOYAL, CoVEffr^AHOeti. r|nHIS EVENING. TUESDAY. October.24.. jE- will be iiL-rfurnipd Sliiksp.e:ire's Piny of CYiVlBELlNE. Rritons-Cymheliiir, Hr. Kcerloii; Polydore,. Mr. Ab; holt; CaiUval, Mr. Duriisel; Cl.nten, Mr; Fiirley; Morgmi, Mr. Chapnian; LeiMialuii I'nstliiiniui:, Mr, C. Kfmble. Kiitnnns-lucliimo, Mr. MnrreaJy^ Caius Ltirius; Mr; Vrtit>.>; V;!!'!!",Mr. JcfFeri^*. QueiMi, Mr!<. l**.iiicit ; Helen, Mis'; .Shaw 5 Ifiioifen, Miss Fuute. Aflrt wliicli Hie new Farre of TOO LATE FOR DINNKIJ. . Frank Pupple�)H, Mr.. Jarn-b; Mr. Kieliolan Twill, Mr. Lipttin;  Kuiirrt Rafter, Mr. Emery;  Moni. FninPt, Mr. Yalf.'i.   Mr!!. Thniii|i.n'I'n<*sclay, The Comedy of Errors: Luciana, Miss M. Ttee (her tirst appearance this seastjn). .V'hakspeaie'a Comedy ofTwolflh Nijlil has been for some lime in preparation, and will speedily be protluerd ; in which will be inlrodiicfd Sonis, Duels, Glees, and Chornsea, se-lertid entirely from the Plays, Poems, and Sojmeta of Shnksprarp. .PKOiVIDENT LIFE OFFICE, llEeENT:STREET. liyOTICE i� hereby eiveiv, that a GENERAL : M EETl NG of the M EM BERS pf* THIS O F EI C E, will be holden here on WEDNESIJAY, the Sib of November next, to ronflrni or reject the Resoliitinn fur a Bonus'of 2 ,00Qi. Consols, Two Prizes of J8,000i. Consols, and 2;0|I0/. Money, making logelber    . FOUR PRIZES OF �20,000. The Drawing, is so. arranged, by order'of Goccrrimentj that the first 1,700 Numbers, wbtch are tlh'se only which are mow uu sale, and all of .which will be drawu First Day, are ciHain of obtaining nt least . T>VO PRIZES OF �20,000, �i the Fifth-drawn Prize, First Day, is to haye 18,000/. Consuls anil 2,()0i)/. Money ; but tliese 1,700 Numbers oi&y actually obtain ALL FOUR PRIZES OF �20,000, and as every Piize above 20i. drawn on tbe First Day, is to be entitled to a new Ticket, or further chance, it is possible that a person buyingonly one Ticket might gain TWO PRIZES OF �20,000. (Sharetiparlicipate in these advantages ) T. BISH does not intend to make any reaervie of Tickets, therefore those persons who wish to have the sa^e.Numher in both Classes, may, if-not already sold, obtain them ; bat from the Numbers ibeiog to limited (l,70ti), not aiiy time should be lost, as the supplies to' Ireland, Scotland, and, the Country Agents, wilt takt; immediately a very, great portion of iberti.; ;   < TICKETSS and SHARES, are selling ot the ContrsiCtor,'s t)ffiee�/4, CorDhil�,,aDd9,.iChai'iug-cro�9, .LofH.on, :n.tfd by his Agents in theiiCouiilry .:,;,- red,.iU|Cp,UBeguence;t>f,i>he-reports of the inju-riuus treatnient.uf tV U'itiicsses, but he raited uii his exertions to get Over.Ih^m. In Col.,Px�>wu's letterlo ftlr, Powell, dated .20lh.Septem-ber, he states.,that "just o(s he-was .going ,to dispatch the courier, Rastelli iLid arrivird, nud expressed himself heartily sick uf the niauaer in ivhicb the wiluesaes were confined in EuglaBd,- Col. Brown's letur, dated 1st October, stdled thalR^si^lTiwasillin.bed, , Mr. Ppwi^ll's letter tu Cuibiiel Brown, of the 2d October, expressts his sorrow st^asielli's unwillingness tu return, and requests tbeCuluDel io send hjm as st.un as possible, as be ought to have been back by the 3d October, which was then impossible, but he niusl reluru,as the Attnrney-Generpl had. giveu express orders to that etfect. Cului�el Hrowii^s relterlo Mr. Powell, dajled2d (.tctobrr, staled lhat Rastelli was still seriously ill with a fevcr^ and that he had been twice bled. .. i A letter of the 4th Octobee was t4 the same effV'ct. After the Report had beeit> readmit was ordered on the motion of Lord Hnrrowby,~lhui the papers be sealed up and ' returned to Mr. Powell.     Counsel were then ordered to be called in. Mr. Brougham advanced to- the-bar and requested that Mademoiselle Demuot might herecalleil. The SoliciloC'Genenil sgtd, shehad.been sent for. ' After a shod jiauee, the Sulicilur-General said he was informed Mr. Vizard, the agent for her Majesty, bad statedlo Mr. Msule, thai Demonl would not be wauted till twelve o'clock,       --    � � � '      '   �� �"� ,ttlr.; Brougham said, Ihathad beibeen in an ordinary.eciurt of JiMticc, he shuulddiaveiiadfSome fldiibtsuf the propriety ,.o,ffering tbe evidence, which he -w^s now iabnut; to ,pro. pnse to their Lordships; but considering tbe nature of the cbarge and the nature of the Court, be could not hut think it ought to be accepted.  The preamble of the Bill charged : her Majesty with bringing seitn||iil>ittd'diiihonouij on : kingdom and briogiUg-inId'ciiiSMntit'lhe'dignil^r uf tbe . Crown. He tenilered the eyi)feiid|^w:liich be now hold in bis hand to rebut that charge, nud'he^iiiighri^^was snffieieiit to satisfy any reasonabletiinn, lllttl^}^ nfiijeslyVcondnet had not been such as the.preiimblpofiilte Bili'sthled.' The paper he held in bis band was an Ansl^jin"(7a2e7^e, published in Trieste at the time her Royal H^hnessivas there. It stilted her reception as a Princees by'uAi'coiistitiited authorities ; lhat she had gone to tbe opera-'iif-the evening, and ie conscious that his evidence could-not be received, be was at a loss what name to apply to so palpable an attempt at making an unautburised impressiou on their Lordships' mind. Mr. Brongham said, that he did not deny (bat it was not evidence usually received in Courts of Justice, but they were not here in a Court of Justice. There her Majesty would have many advantages ; for instance, she could have rhalleiiged all those of the Jury who bad sat on the Grand Jnry. She conid have been admitted to object to such of the Jurymen as had made dcelaralions out of doors hostile to her Majesty; and above all, she could have objected to the prosecutors, to those who had preferred the' Bill, from sitting as her Judges. All those things would have been open to him in a Court of Justice ; he did not know if their Lordships would be pleased to permit it to he opened to him at a future period-if he thought they would, he should feel comforted at the refusal to hear tbe evidence he now offered. He should be well content if his Learned Friends would convert that into a Court of Justice, and ad. init him to all the advantages he h-id stated, and then he sluiuld be willing to waive his right'to offer the evidence now proposed. But when a person was to be tried by an adverse party-by those who were one day the acciiseis anil the next ilay sitting in jlidgment ou the parly accused, that was such an anomaly against as would jiis.tify his claiming tbe receiving the evidence now offered J^bi* the lllustrions Accused. " The Lord Chancellor, after putting the question t'o the House, informed tbe Counsel for the Queen that the papers offered as evidence could not be received. The F-arl of Lauderdale wished Lieutenant Hownam's diploma of the Order of St, Caroline to he put in. The Lord Chancellor asked if Mr. Hown'am was in attendance. Lieutenant Hownam appeared al the bar and produced the diploma. The Lord Chancellor directed that it should be put in, Mr, Brougham asked if the document was under the regular seal of the order?-l^i'gh.) - '' ' � The diploma was then read in the original Italian, and trsniilated by the Marquis Spinetto, paragrapli by paragraph. It ran thus in the English:- '� I    The Earl of Lauderdale ofTereil 3 few words as fij the mode in which 'the-witness should 'be examineil. i The Lord Chancellor said, that it would be within their : Lordships' recbileclioh that the rule they had hitherto pursued Ibroughout these prucecdings was, that after the exa-miilation, the cruss-exaniinatiun, tbe re-examinnliun, nml the examination by the Peers bad been gone through, Counsel on both sides should be permitted to suggest to the House any further questions they might wish to be asked, which if their Lordships thought proper they would alio* to be put. Acting on this rule, the course in ihe present instance would be, for the Counsel to put any questions Ibey might desir^ to ask through the House but ; perhaps it would save their Uirdships'time if they were to allow Ihe ; qursliuns to be put to the witness by tbe Learned Counsel at unce. . Louise Dcmont was then placed at the bar, and examined by Mr. Williams.    . I wish to-know whether the witness is acqnaiuled with a prrson nnmed Frances Martini ?   No. "]_, .        - fs she acquainted with a man uamed Henry Mn'riini? 1 - do nut recollect any such person. Does she^knuw a place in Swll-Zerland called Morge? Yes. The woniau I speak of lives at that place, does the witness know any such person ?   I know n person at Morge of the name of Marchini, but nut Martini. I wish to know whether the witness saw that person, under the amended pronunciation, in April 1818 1 liave seen ber several times, hut 1 do nt>t recollect in-what month. Was it in the year 1818? I do not recollect, but I miy have seen her in the course of that year. Does she remember sending for that woman to alter a bonnet for her ? I cannot recollect seudiiig fur her; because I did not live at Morge. Did the witness never see her on the subject of repairing ber bonnet, during the year 1818 ? I may have seen bei, bill I do not recollect whether 1 did oi- nut. Does the witness know such a �-onian ?   Yes, 1 do know the woman M;irchiui. I wish to know if she had any conversation with her on tbe subject of the Princess of Wales in the year I8IS ? As I do not recollect seeing her in the conrse ot' that year, 1 cannot recollect having such a conversatiiin-with hrr. Did the witness see that person after leaving the service of the Princess of Wales?   Yes, I saw her after that. Had she not some conversation �-ilh her about the Princess of Wales, after she had left her Royal Ilighoias'.* service? I do not recr)llect having any coover.-*atio"  with her about he more virinoos than the Princess of Wales?" 1 do nr.i re. collect-I ennuot rccollrtl having a conversation with Marchini ou tins subject. Will she swear she never did ? I cannot swear it, hot I have uot the least recuiltction. Now ask the witness whether she believes those expresjiins, or expiessioos to that efl'ecl, were usTd by ber to .Marcbini ? , I do not recollect such a question, b'Ut if the qoi-s'iun !ooI{^ place, 1 do uot think. 1 do not believe 1 made smlIi �1|> not think, 1 answer. Did you not also obseive that in all the proyerot'-riis uf the Prlutcst, that she had no friend but iheold Kjij: '-^ Tilt Loid Cliancellur-The heller �ay wPuM !)- i'- |j^if V. through me, not only as to the propriety of the question itself, but as tu Ihe manner it is pui, if it is tu be put down  r-Put Ihc question. 1 will not swear, but I do Dot Iwlirve 1 (vcr said it. All tbe snbspquenl que^ttjoos were piil thiough the Lord Cliaocellor. A*k the witness whether she wa^ at Morgf- la the monlU of November, I8IG? 1 have been several unies at Motge; 1 may have lieen there th;it nu�oili. Does the witness recollect, one way or the other, whether she was or not there in the month of Nov^miifr' 1 iu>y have been then- in that mouth, hut I do not exiictly reri'llfct, I was there either the euvl of November or beginniiis uf Decenibt-r. Ask whether Marcliiui  Hn*l of Ulue aiul silver. Col. Bart. Bergami, Baron of Fi-nnchtna, Knight of Malta and the Holy Sepulchre, and Grand Master uf the Order of CaroJinc. To Jos. Hownam, Kuight, in the suit of her Royal Highness tbe Princess of Wales.   (n0.ji5 or 16.) The. Duk�-of Somerset wished to put a few questions to Lirul, Hownam respecting the teul iiji tbe polncre. Earl Gn y tuggesled lhat it wuuld. be more regular to call Lieutenant Hownam at the c|use of Jthe defence. .The Lord Chancellor ttfquircd the original aud translation of the diploma to fie put in. Lord Holland wished fur some explanation of an item in the accounts of exilenaea for the 'prosecution of the Bill, amounting tu }8,()()U'<. said tu be transferred from the Secret Service money.  The Eail uf Liverpool gave some explanation, in justification of appropritttiug the money, of that fund, to the purposes of the |irosec,utio.n. His Lordship "promised the fullest explanation of the various items in dne time. The Earl nf Darnley wi�hei! to know if the papers on the table contained the whole expendiln're fur the prosecution, including that of the Milan Commissiun. The Earl of Liverpool replied, thai those were all Ihe expcliaes nf the Milan Com.mission, aud the prusecutiuu which couhl be made up tu the time, the expenses uf mes-seilgei-s excepted. - Earl Grey wished-to know under what department Ihe expenses of messengers will be found? The Earl of Liverpool replied-" In the accounts of tbe Foreign Department."  ' MADEMOISELLE DEMONT. Mr. Denman, b'furc the witness came to the bar, wished to state the grounds uo which tjiey called fur tbe Indulgence whichthey bad solicitcil. It was iit)t the intention of the Cuiinsel for (he defence to attempt to, prove aiiy parttciilar. fact. They would merely quesliou her us to a certain cun-. yersntion. . If she admitted it, they would .talie tlie benefit uf such ad'missioiv-if she denied it, ihcjy.would 'ihcii be at liberty to'bring evideiirc to contradict brr;  ' The Lord Chancellor IliouBht it right to slate that the object of the I.eBrned-,Cuunsel iii recalling the witness shniild ha*e;heei] staled be&ire. As' lUe Bouse, however,-in. one instance had recalled a witness under such circumslanccsi �od, in another, had seemed as if it wonid agree to such a course, he had little doubt thnt they wouldTigrce to it. the Princess of Wales. Can she recollect whether lhat person .tlarehini, spoke with her about her journal ? 1 do not recollect her talking with me about the juuinal. Does she mean to say, lhat she had not any conversation wilh ber about her journal  I may have had, but 1 do nut rrcolleot it; it might be. Does she not reniemhpr the woman .Marchini speaking to her 00 the conduct of the Princess of Wales ? I do not recollect it. Does she not recollect saving any thing to her of the persons who surrounded Ihe Princess of Vales ? I du not le. collect : I have often spoken of Ihe Princess, but nut of the persons who surrounded her. Dill not the woman, Marchini, ask the witness questions about the character of the Princess of M'ales? 1 do not recollect-1 do not remember to have bad any conversation with her on lhat subject; but it may he so. She does recollect being at Morge? Yis, IhaVe been at Morge several times. Dors she not remember Mnrchiui putting to her this question, " Whether her Royal Highness was not a woman of intrigue?" {nneflhnme gdtante),   1 do not at all recollect it, 1 do not remember having any cdnversation with that woman ^Au the/s^iJiject of tbe Princess of Wales. Dues she mean to say that she had not any such conversation, and that the woman did 710/ put that questiou to hrr? I do not at all recollect. Will shesayVbat it is not tbe fact, that snrb a question was put to ber by that person? I do nut at all remember such a question being put to nie. Does uot the witness rem.ember being angry al tile subject of her Royal Highness's couduet being meutioued to liei' by Marcbini?   I du dot recollect this conversation. Nor saying at that lime to the woman Marchini, that " it was all.a.calninny, and that it was the enemies of tbe Princess who had spread such reports about her ?" I du nut recollect auy thing at all like it. Will she swear she did not say so ? I will not swear I did not ; it may be .but 1 do nut recollect it; before I was put on my oath, I never said any thing about what passed in her Royal Highness's house. "That being so, will she now say that she never did say any thing like this ? 1 do not recollect any conversation of the kind. Will she swear she did not say so ' I cannot swear, be. cause I do nol recollect. Did she not say to Marchini that from the time the Princess left England she had been surrounded with' spies ? I could never have said so, because I myself never saw any spies. Will she swear she never said so ? 1 cannot swear that ; but I tlon't recollect ever having said so. I thought she said this moment, lhat she could not have said so, becausp she never saw auy spies? 1 du not recollect ever having said so at all. < 1 thought she told me a minute ago, that she could not have said so, becau-ie she had not seen any spies ? 1 do believe 1 never said so al all. Will she swear she did not ? 1 will nut swear; but I do not think 1 ever said so. Did she never tell lhat woman lhat " the Princess was a Lady of honour ?"   1 do nol recollect having said so at all ? Nor lhat "the most innocent aciions of her life were always misinterpreted?" 1 have no recollection of this con. vetcsatiou at all. As the convei-sation was rather a long one, I wish to know whether the witness has a bad memory ?-[No answer, we believe, was given lo this question.] Will she swear that this conversation, or any part of it, did not pass in the year 1818 between her and Marchini ? I cannot swear what 1 cannot recollect; I do not recollect if I bad such a conversation at all. Does she know a lady of Ihe name of Jacroix, at Morge Yes. |fc Did tbe witness ever visit her ?   Yes, I Ifl^jp been there several times. In 1818 ? I have been there several times since I left the Princess, but I do not recollect at what time. Was she not there on a visit to that pereoii in 1818? Yes, I was there in 1818. In that year, and when on a visit to that person, had she not a bonnet repaired hy this Marcbini ? It may be, but 1 do not positively recollect it. Does she mean that she does not recollect at alt having a boiyiet repaired by .Marchini bave had several boonets altered by Marchitii. Did she not tell her, that �he had always been about the person of the Piiucess ? I do not at all recollect telling her that. Will she s'wear that Marrbini did not remark to her, that ** as she bad always been near the person iif the Princess, she must have observed all her aciions ?" 1 do not recollect this conversation; it may have been; but I have nol tbe smallest idea of it. Tbe Earl of Lauderdale made some remark on Ihe inler-pretation of tbequestions. The Lord Chancellor then desired the Interpreter to put the questions exactly as Ihey were proposed hy the Counsel. Did Marchini ask you if you had ever seen any thing unchaste in the condnci of the Princess? I do not recollect at all having had any coiivieriiation - I had uot the least idea of it. Will you swear it did hot happen, that it did nut lake place iiV'tbesewordsi.or-words l� the same effect? 1 cannut swear it-I-do not recoiled it at all. Will you swear that ynu did not reply to this effect, � ' My God! never in my life, it is impossible for any body i0 , , .....' reeolletl SL-eh a eoni-srsa- 1 (lavc not Ihc least iiieu of il. Will -she swear lhat Aladauie  Marehifii d-d nol a^k thit question '    1 cannot posiluely snea.- ,1, hnl 1 have nut U.r. Itast ultauf 11. Did she Jul nut It  u-n?  verv ejve uiit : Lord Chancellor-IJas she said any fhiug iu the ' of ihe exaiiiiiialiou atunil bt.-ii) o�ii     ht r rlnid^" Ttte Lord Ctmicenor satii, �he hilerpielrr iitust the words '* iu aiigwM 1 have nol ihe le.i�i idea of siirh a ronversation. Doe* she bflu've this couvi rsjition ever look place? lieve it did not. 1 wish llie witness to be asked, whether she, the witiiPS", did nol say, that ll was possihle, alter the" dealli lue Piiucess, that her Royal Htiihoens wouki nuke some dun:' iMition 111 the expenses ol" her hoiisehohl ' J have uof th-^ le-Ast idtav�f it. Will you swear it did not lake place? I will not po^i-lively swear it did not take pljce, bul I du not leeoUect it. 1 wish Ihe wniiefls lo be asked, whrii ibe fii^l timi; Ihm she wa;^ put upon her ualli itpini the itnhjrer ot her evi-deurf in t^eiieral \ when it wjs she tirst made any depn 'I'he course ( Mr. William*-Yes, iny I-i�rd. The Lord Chancellor i-eatt that part. Mr. Brougham-She haa said soineihiut; about that ; hot imlependtiut of it I apprehend we are entitled to examine ber lo it. Tbe fc>oid Cbaucellur-Von are caUing her an lo her dp-clamtiond, and uol lo afiVcl her general credit. You mean to bring, I suppose, t-onie wil�e^s lo prove ih-i? bhe d:d state tlufie lhing>^, bul 1 do nut lliink ymi can g^t i-.tUt anuthir hiad ut' evidence, in 1)m.i slu;{c of the case. If h.t evidence does not iillude lo any oath lu.day, soint explaui-lion should be  ul on her nalh The Lord Chancrllnr-You will explain to her lh.it the >quesliuu is when t>he was tiist put upon hei* oath-when she was first sworn. The Solicitor-General reque.sted that the queatiou aud answer inij;;hv be read. Air. Bruuphain-The question and answer has been read. Tlie Solicitor-General-I under.'itood the Hou!)e lo inea.i that the question and atiswrr shouhl be r*'ad tu the witness. iMr. Wiilianis-You yhould not interlVrt-, Mr. Solicitor-, it is not ywur v*^tlDess. - The Lord Chancellor-Neilhrr is il yours: it is nol the CouHsers examinaiion at all, Mr. Williama. ftlr. Williams-That is the reason why i objected. The Lord Clianct-Uor-ll hag bet o staled, from first lo last, that durioK the exaniiualion by the l.uids, a Coi ^^,   f I am eutitled to do it, some questions as to the jouo^. > i.u,. Rome to Seiirgatjlia? 'J he Lord Chancellor-You cannot put that q i-s-tion. What may be done when the case la closed is anoihrr thing. By the Earl of Landerdafe-Doe, she recollect the day nf the month she lift her Rnyal Hi;;hne9S*9 service at Pe>arw ' II was in the beg-nnin;; of November, but I do not recollect the dale. Can the witoeos flalP'Huw many days it wa? before the witness wrote a letter from Milan' 1 wrote the letter giji the same day, iri ihe evening, Ou my arrival at Milaa.-^ (Cries of " mthdraw V'} By the Earl of Lauderdale*-! witib to ask the witoess whether, antecedent tu leavtnt; Pesaro, accounts had Came of the l*riuc?S8 Charlolle's death '   No. Mr. Brougham-We wish Demont to be present while we examine another wttnesR. The Lord Chancellor-For what purpose? Mr, Brougham-it is very, likely when she seen the witness, lhat she will give another ausw^rr. The Solicitor-General-I apprehend that the way for to do any ibiog of thai kind, is for us, if we think iii, t\>   

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