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British Press: Tuesday, September 5, 1820 - Page 1

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   British Press (Newspaper) - September 5, 1820, London, Middlesex                                THRATRE-RQYAL, DJiURY-LANK. TliB last eleven pprfbimaiiceii of Mr; ICeani before lii8 posi-; �.....I'v^drparltircforAmerica.   �      *    �  ' THIS   E VEN IISfG,, TU ESD A Y,  Sept; 5, his MajcslyVSel-vaiUn will perform the Play of ' THE xWUNTAlNEERS.   ^ Oclavian, Mr.Keaii; Virolet, -Mi'.;Jefiries; Kilmallock, Mr. ThompsoHRoque^ r RTr. Powell; RawtoWj Mr. Brom-kvj Bulcazen.IH[�Ieyi hy (IieYOung Gentleman who wno so fivouTabiy received''in jTiins; Gaacm,^ Mr. Vinlnj;�,Sadi, Mr, Russell. iZorayda',?Mre. AV. West; Floraothe, Mrs. Eger-ton; Agnes,Miss'iCubilt.'      ' ^ ' ,- i      ^Aftftr which, the Farce of. ; , li,.,   PAST TEN O'CLOCK. Sir PeUr Pnnf Itialj Mr. H upliea; Old Snap�,.'Mr. GnUie; . Youne.|!nnpa,-Mr. Raymond; Harry Pnnclual,' Mr. Thomp-�nn;' Dbzfyi^Mr." Miindeo. Lucy, Mrs, Edwin'; T(ancy, Wi8s.,Cubilt.,-o '.^        '   � '  Boxes, 7s. SecbniJ ^Price, 3s. 6d.-Pit< 3ff. :?d.; Si-cohd P/ice, 2s;-toWer-iGlllery; 2j. Second Price^f Jsi-iOpper ?all�ry,a�. Seco6dPricfe,-6d.      ��    ^''v' '^/K^ the l^rforijia'ncea on-'iMcii"]^^ '' Tb AYSilS^ BOND-STREET! The Principal Characters by Messrs.Terry, Jones, Lisfon, J. Russell, Barmirdjjyvniiains, Mrs. PearcejMrs. Walkinson, and Mrs. Sirtrdyn.     ^ . The l^rplo^iie to he spoken by Mr. Connor. To�onc)ndc.witli(4lh lime these twenty-six years), THE SUICIDE. Tobine, Mr.C. Kemble;-Tal)by, Mr. Terry-, Dc Truby, Mr.'Touuger; Catchpenny, Mr. Williams; Ranter, Mr.^J. Russell; porince, MrVConnbr;'. Sqnib, Mr. Farley; Win-, yravc, Mr. Barnard:   Mrsi Grogram, Mrs, Pearce; Nancy, Mrs. Mardy'n; Peggyi Mrs. Jones. B'ox^si. 5s.-PHi 3s;-First Gallery, 2s.-Second Gal-J    lery. Is".-        ''    ; � . '       �� The Doors to he opfned at Six o'Clock.and the Perform-*"� ance to befrtn-atSwni-j .�   _  '.' " Places for the Bo'xeB''tb be taken of Mr. Massingham, at . the Theatre. - i; v -  - Private.Boxes'may be had, nightly, by application at tlie Box-oeSce;; "rU ' ,' ' T -m6rrow, t).06r Days in Bond.street!-Sylvester Dagger-'-wbod-and^Excbange rib Robbery.              � On ThnrSday, Dog Days in Bond'Streel! with Exchange no Robbery.   ,     .     . Tile Public are tnbst" respectfullj^ inforitied, that^ Mr. '"   Srahani is engaged at this Theatre for a limited number of 'Nights, atid will make his first appearance on Monday next, in Guy Mimneriii'g.  '. � .        THEATRE-ROYAL'; ENGLISH OPERA-HODSE, STRAND,     .� . ;rjpris.�EVENlN0...:tiiESDAy:, .iSeiAv,s, j �.'   will be perforine4i;2<| ^ime, a new Operatic Drama, in three acts, called ^    ,. :       . TjliySARpN pfi TRENCK. Mr.'jBroadhiij^^ ofLindorf, Miss Carew- Josfepli(ne^ .Miss toyejiCatau, iMr.s. Grove; Nannetle, Miss l.Slevepspp.',, - .,      ..   .,     ; Smith; Peter; Mr. Filz*illiam, Frabiz, Mr. Bulgtyay. Couptcsj'Zatcrloo, Mrs. Dibiliii  Elizabeth', Miss Taylor; -Mira', Miss Poole; ..rflicia, Miss Jonas. After the Melo-drame (6ni),tinie). a^iciV iimad Comic � .,      Bnrlet^j.in twoArtSjCillcd '   Stop thief; '      OR, THE HORRORS OF THE FpREST. ,     : GsiTo: Farmfield,;.Afr.iWalkiusui);, Jonp&hap^ Mr^ Fitz-william; Copslcy,  Mr. Ridgway.   CecUia,   Miss Poole.; Fanny Copsley, Miss Copeland;'^D&me ji^'armfield,: Mrs; Smith. :.,,;.,(,. ,   ;r.;.B.ox3, iMi-rFiJ, 2s.-Gallery,.!?., ; Dnors\open at Half-past Five, (legin-at .Halfrpast-SiK, Half.pnc'^at-Half-paatEighl.   . .', BE ABBOT :=THre(^' V^)!*; 1/ 4s.. -By, the Author of."Waverley,"', &c. at.S.4MS'ii.- Bookseller to his Royal Highness the Dube'oftYork,'No-1,'Si. JamesV fiircst. J.. , t^pfiR'NIEXT of KIN " (if Hm) �f ^IOHN i, JONES, laie^helongiiigj to thetElft India merchant plMp,Larfcf(rey;rfefe"ased; hj'^applyinjyi'tP-Mr, Owcp,'-'No; 3; Bell.yar4, Doctois' (Qommons,'may hear''of-something; to their ^dvantagfeVii'^'f '.('   ,--.!)�.;:-v       /^.x.^j --j n    .r^yJ Household furniture bought jTuririif theT'i^tilfc^'*-'--"-"-'"-"'''"'^ everydesifiijillo'fi ' wi?l�ed;to ftvuid_ the |iremises^'tiV'wlierenuerejS;iioi:sn^Vlf^",*u.iu  pnd dispense.wtt^^tlie.^^ remoTfllandAleoftheBanie.   .,,        1   ,       , 136, Jjitt/i&i.-jjllfc motl be p'aid; "� ARMV CONTRACTS. CoM-iiissARiAT Department, Treasory Chambers, August 22, 18-20. ^T^^OTICE     lierehy ^iven to iilf Persons desir-J_T . om of Contracting to supply the following Articles fur the Use of the Army, viz__  BREAD,   : Tuhis Majesty's Land Forces in Cantonments, Quarters, i and Barracks, . in the nirtier-menlioncd' Counties and Islands:- .     ' Gloucester -(in-,   eluding the City of Bristol),-Guernsey,     ' Hftlitf, Hcipford, ;Herlford, 'Hunts, , Ijile of.Man^. Isle of Wight, Jerseyj,  ' �cni.;;tiiicri��irng � Tilbn-ry Fort in the CouUly  of Essex), Lancaster, Leicester, . Linrain, Middleseic, Monmouth, ,,'Altlerney, .B.etlfordj I Berks   (in.cludrng - the    "Town   of  � ,flu.nEerfprd), Berwick, >BbckBi -�. " Cambridge Cinclud--   in'g the Town- of- Newmarkftt), .j  work with--plaster of Paris and marble sand-for that 1 was lo work by coptract. r   .. �    '�> *  Was Gangiari at the house in the mornine? -He was' at ItheiVilla d'Este; Lwaited for him ti|l nine O'clock, but he did not send as he-prum'iBe ,aMd as I had twelve or fifteen meu with me, } went tti the Villa d'Esls to lobkaftei Jtheagciit, - ' \ ^ - ' � .'What distance is:ihe hogse o,f Gangiari from the Villa d'Este: Gangiani dwelt in the house uf'tbe Pi-incess ol Wales. �   '     " r '    '   ;  �    "       "'     ; ' .. How far efF Is the house lie was-hnildingfrom the Villa d!Este? About three gun shots or four huiidreirand-fifly paces When you got-to the Villa d'Este;.did you inquire for-the agent?: No,'. I went immediatelyifito't'he kitchen to seek Jhim-.-. . ., --'i^-p-,; - ;.Pid you go any whereielse to seek him ? - I did. " � I" Did you go lip Rlalrs ? ' I did. '-i ' - ' '' ' , .Was he in the large rooiir? --1 went into a room  it ivng not a great,room.; it was very littte ; I opened a dooi*^ FSiaw a great m'iuy!dourx.;r I was out oftiiimuur, �having'sb many men who had ipstra great deal of lime-;- 1 opened the door eud=shut itagaiii.'.'-';'(       -'        ..     �       - '-" ' ; Whom did you see ? The Baron and the Princess ; they were boibscalcd.r- j...  - What Baron?   Bergainl. "     : ' .^Oii'Aylintn�;i'elhey;,8itiine?  Thc^twere' sittiilg hplh-lo-gcther; Berganu's arm was round the neck -uf the Princess^ ; On what were ihcy wtruig?   Whether'rt -was;* sPfay'wlie-(hec:it. wa^.ad c�By!cltair^ or whether it was a. smull bed, I don't'know-:] was ciinfusedi /'V -How did the hbijom of ihe RfJncewappear?; Sttewas'un. covered frotn here-(inaking'a maik acrolts his brensli) - -' , lii'whal posilJotl'wa'slhe Pfiucess'*  sije*was iijtiffgl' ,W��anywneelae-iii the room beside* lh'e^:Prtii)i3tritl3 JB*rfeaB�t^'':i*twi^P^5e.tl�fi,|?w'=:'; '�:;;^W;'.:t?:f l;':;^i,-."''i; When ydlfWiff �i *'h�t did Bexgami do ?   He took 8way::hls arm from -(heiitfcb'-of*-the Princeis, nud told me "What do you want.here,, you dog?" The Interpreter said the KWitln^ was Stronger -(JigUo di cane), and meant'> von sbnoftatlvg^" What did'ya�:say-to the;'t)anm-?''-1 told him he must excuse me, I came here to faHilrafler the agent-'that 1 had soinany menwaittngfor tlie.'Hialerrali,'aud 1 wanted to put them lo work,   j    '     .   '..-�i;--j .tr Did Bergami make any reply? . He told me Hiat was not the apartmeiiL'fu'r.lb.e'mai40u^:t5rv�ork.in;,'  . Did you ever afterwards see the Princess and Bergami tegeilier?   'I saw them once'niorei- ...... Where did .he see them logither'?.:: They ^vrere descending the staircase,.arm in-arm.     ^ Did he see themidu'any Ihirtg ib-each 6l!jer at that lime? I saw them in descending stand fpra tabmeiit on the stairs, fori was crossing-them., * ^ Did'he see theih'atr any otllc^tiroe.^�>side�i1.ba.t which he Near the Princess ? - Ye's. - - How r as I have seen it.*asnncfl|�red, - ' , The Lord C^ucellor-de>ired.-thea^itne8!i to mark how much, \yas uncovered?,. Ididnot.^ay>)p'lopfc, Lsaw it and made my escape-I.saw it in tlie'tfviukliiig pf an eye-r(a laagh)- It.was uncayered.asfar a# Aere(|>oiuting to his person as he had dboe,befo.ce.),,.;. � Did. yo,.u s.ee Ber^ami'a liand on Jiec jSoyal Higbness's breast?"''Yes. '' '      ' ' ' '   " ' ^ . Was it so, or'nol ? . Isay y^s;. , .        ,    /, -' How was she dressed, .at the moinent ? , I can't^say; Isay what!'paw; .1 was surpripe^. ..- jihsials)     , .-'  ,      .....- ' Aiioiher Peer-The. witness Has said lliat Bergami'sarm' was roiiiid.the ,Princess'a^eck,.and4hen,bB; saidfthat it was behind Jier 'ncc^; 1 wiatvto knowlyhe.ther.tlieBriiitwas rouu^ or h'ehin'd'iireiieck? The witness, pointing to iji^ Interpreter, " I am the Princess-, ypnare Bergami.'* . He was interrupted by general laughter', in,which the interpreter joined. Da you say that the Hrin^woiv/opud'lier neck,- or not ?: I said what I saw-I toiBil iras so,.and I eveni repeated it many times.   * , ----- The witness Ihenfcfired from the bar.,,, . . Some Noble Lord here* observed on.the indecorum of the Interpreters Jiaving^aug&ed.       '    . '  , The.Earl of Liverpool saidj.lhst a^- ,it was a momentary impi-.esuioii,'and. had. been ; felt in,.Ihe,same,way.Uhtoijgh-uut'lhe House, he!did nut tbiuk any,noticp.;Bhonld.be taken �nt.     , The Lord Chancellor coocurwd in,opini.oiiiwi�b,fhe EarJ of LiverpoPl^ that,tWlnterjireters ivere excusable^ltndcr the ciriumstaiices. ' ] Alexaudro Fiuetti Kftrr.fheni'^attett,:;ttnd>i:examtned by the Attorney-Generai. Are you tin ornnmci^titi :|iainter ?  V^ni    ' , (VVereyou.ever.esftplovedlal ViUa-  whom ? The Barpli. " What Baron ?   The Baron Bergami. How long yere you at the Villa d'Este ?   More than two yeats.      - Did you afterwiil-ds go lo Rome with the Princess ?  I did. ^dti'were vou employed wlieu you went to Ruble; in what situation ?   He dues not cumpreliend the question. T he queslibn was repeated?   I was a servant. - During Ihe time lint you were at the Villa d'Este, did ydu ever see the Princess and Bergami together?   1 have. Wherfe have yoo seen theiti together? VVal&ing about the grounds of llie villa. ^ In ti'hat manner ?   She wa6 holding the hand of Bergami. Were they.alone, or was any other-person with Xhem ? Sometimes they w*re alone, and sometimes the ' Jiqme d'Honneut was with them. Have you eVer seen them in a boat on the like? Many times. * -When you have seen them,in a boat together w.ere the^ alone? Sometimes alone and sumetiines wiifa^ the Uame dr-Bonnenr: ., Did you kno�r the room, of Bergami at tbe.jri[|a d'Este ? -Ivdo-. - � --� - -     - ,-,-jL�>.,."- Co you remembel- being at any time in the anlicbamber of that room ?   Yes. At what tifiie of the day was it that you were in that nnti-chamber?   It was'in the morning, between ten and eleven' o'clock. Did you see Bergami at that time? I saw him come out -from the side where-the Princess's room was. How was he dressed? In a morning gown, with only his drawerson. In wh&t direction did he go ? He was going towards bis room. Did he go lo his room ; did you see where he went? Yes ; he went to his room. Did he see you ?   He saw me. When yon were at Rome at the vilta Brandi, did you wait at table?. 1 did. ,        . Did you wait at dinner and supper?   I did. Who.used t.o dine aud sup wilh Ihe Princess ? Sometimes some persons who had been invited from Rome. Did Bergami dine and sup with her Royal-Highness ? He did. Did Luigi Bergami dine and sup with the Princess at villa Brandi ?   He did. Did Bergami's mother dine and sup with the Princess at Villa Brandi?. She did not. * Do you remember being at Rufinelli with the Princess? I do. Was Bergs mi during the residence at Rufinelli ill ? He was. Was he confined to his.room ? , (By the Interpreter.) He wishes to know if yon mean confined to his room or to his bed? Did he keep his room or his bed?   He kept'his bed. Have you ever.seen the Princess in his room? Many times. What did her Royal Highness do his room ? She was there conversing. .With whom?   With Bergami- Have, you ever seen Bergami taking medicine while he was ill?   1 have seen bim. Who gave him the medicine? Sometimes I have seen the Princess. Were you ever present when Bergami's bed was warmed ? 1 was not present when theJied was warmed, but 1 brought the lire. �Have you seen Bergami ge.t out of bed for the purpose of having his bed warmed ?   I have.' Waatlie Princess in the room at that time?   She -was. Dp you remember going from Ancuna to Rome with the Princess?   I do.    . On any evening during Ihe course of that,Jonroey, do yon remember seeing the Princess and Bergami any where ? Not in Ihe evening. At any other time of the day or niglM? Never in the night; I Jiave in the day. Did you see them together ?   Yes. At what time of the day was it you saw them? I do not remember whether it was before or after dinner. At the time yon-saw them together, did you make any observation on their conduct?   I have. What was it? Passing through a court I have seen the Princess so (describing by signs with his arms.) Who was with the Princess at that time ?   Bergami. You have described the Princess putting her arms about some person ?-   4 Mr. Brougham objected to this question ; the witness had not saidiwhat the .iltorney-Geueral had ascribed lo him; be had made certdin descripiive motions, but as the back of the minutes uf evidence would not be ornamenled wilh cuts, it would not there appear'on what the Attorney-General founped his present question. The Lord Chancellor directed the Interpreter to inform tlie.witness that he must give his auswers by words and nut by signs. �; Describe how you saw the Princess and Bergami at the lime of passing the Count ? The Princess was embracing Bergami. You have said you saw Berganli embrace (a66racciare) the Princess, what do you mean by the word embrace-how were their arms placed? The Princess put her hands behind Bergami, round under his arms. You say then that the Princess put her bands round under Bergami's arms behind him ?   Yes.        ' _ In what direction were their faces at that time relatively to each other ?   One against (opposite) the oilier. ' Were their faces near loKether or how ?   Their faces were at a distance from each otiter, she being short and he tall__ (^laughter, and cries of'f Order'")   .      , Have you ever beeu at thc'Villa Caprili, near Pesaro? Yes,.I have. .    . Wilh the Princess?   Yes. . Did you ever see the Princess and Bergami together at CaprHi ?   The first evening 1 was there.1 saw the.m together. Whereabouts? Out of Ihe bouse, on the steps that lead down 40 tbe-gafden. '  *  - -. What were Ihey^loing when yon saw them there ?. I went to look, for-the key, and I thought it was the wife of the agent,7bijt 1 found it was tlie Princess embracing .Bergami as I have described. .,   \- Did you ever see Bergami and the Princess in that situation at auy other time?   Not at Caprili. Did you in any other: place ? 1 have seen: them .sometimes also at the Villa d'Este.   �     . ,     ,;   '-' Did you ever see them do any thing else- to each other? I saw .them kiss. ... ^ Did yon sayvH'issi?   Yes; Tialja*-. Did ypu see that only once, or tBore than once? -1 think I sSw it only:once llien. Art etiiertimes Ido not remember. i The Attorney-General said he had no further questions to. ask of this witness; and the Queen's Counsel declining to proceed to his cross-examination at present (on.the ground. We'presume, of his being-totally unknown'to tbein), he was ordered to withdraw. ' -     -" 'Domenicb Brnza was then-called in, sworn, and examined by Mt. Park.  . What country are you of?. I am an Italian. Of irhat trade?   A. 1 am a mason. Have you been- nt any lime employed in the service of the Princess of Wales ?  .Ves, ;l have. . Haw lung were voir so employed ? From the ^ar 1815 to the midile of 1817. IVereyon at the Villa Villani? Yes. And lilsb at the Vill? d'Este?   Yes.      ^        ' And at the Barona?   Yrs^-there also.   '  � Diij you cveji- see the Princess and Eiergami together? Yes. � HaVe you seen them together often? 1 have seen them once, twice^ three times. .      ,.  � ' Did you-ever.Bce.them walk: together?!^(The Interprtcr rendered the\;erd,ioaM,-pme�r9Mre,which produced pome little misuijderAtBnding'.)-^Ye8, ;      -    - Ho�rdid.they:walkwbei>7ou saw them? They went in a bP9taathe lakel VVerctbey in the boat ^aloiie^ or was-any body with them? TJiejt werealene. When you saw them valkinri Ingetlirr, were ihV} aloi!'-, r Was any body else'in company "r   'lliiy were al'lie. Did tliey walk separate, Or arm in aiin ? They wercalooe, and lie was loivivg. How were llipy when (Iiey were w.ilfiing tcigrl licr r CStitl passet/fliare)   They were alonf. Did yon tvet see tlieni wiill^ing lojrlli.-r on iaiiii ? Ku; I never made any observ.-iiion 4>f' ilicin wiiikn,-;: uii |:iiiii. When you were at Villa dErilc, did jou see u cerlain Bd-roii lliere ?   Yis. What w:is lie called ?   Baron BeVijami. Did you ever see Hie Princess sitliug, and Efrgami.siIIin3^ at the same linif?   Yfs-, al the ft-a>l. At whaffeaSi ? Nl. Bjrlholoincn's day-it was (lie house-warrainj al the Ville d'Esle. What time of the day was it when you saw llirm sitting together? In ihe evening. In \rh'\t place was il ? They were silting on a^bei^cli under some IrceRi it was in a kind uf arbour. Was any one else there al thai lime, liesiiles tlic.Biroir and Ihe Pfiu'ceSs ? 1 saw Only tlie Baron and llie PiincMS there.' Do you know Ra�azzoni ?   Tfs. Was any l)o.ly with yon when yon saw the PrircrS's jiii.I the' Baroi! siiiiiig together uuder the iret-s .' "i es-, we ivt-if; going to the Piazia. ^ Do yon recollect lieing at work at any lime at llw villa d''Esle, near Ihe corridor ?   Ves. Was il in a room thai you were working, or where was it ? It was in a rooiti, and there wa.s also Diujllirr room. ,.. Was there a door from ilDe room lo iheiiilu-r?   Vr*. Oppnsile lo llrat door, at Ihe ulhrr end of 111.5 ruotn, wa^i there another door:- Mr. Denniaii observed, that the witness's TrcmDry ecpinci to be qnile frt-sh, be hoped hin Lt-.iriu-d I-'ririni �vi>ulil not put his qlfi-suons in a leading inannrr. The Lord Chancellor desired il'.e question mijhl In- pui, wheiher there was any other door, leaving il for the wii:u-.i lo describe the situation. Was there any other door in the second room? Ve';, ihcre was another. ^ In what (lirertiou was that from Ihc door no! of Ihr !irr,t room?   Thi'y wire opposite each other. When the door of llie room in which yon'wrre at v,-tMk Was open, and ihe other door ynu have de^rrih-d w'a': alsu open, eonid you see through llieni both?   \>'hpii 1 was jdh out, the boy w-as coming from the other room, and we inrc together. When you met the boy ronld you see into ihf oilier room' Yes, I cuuhi, for the doorwas open. . When Ihe duur was open did you see any person in ikat room ?   Yrs. Whom did you see there ?   The Princess and the -B iron. What Baron?   Bci-jranii. W^aa llie Princess sil ting or standjiig ?   Slainliiig. tVas Bergami silting or standing: :   Slanditr*;. �What wCre they doing f They were caressing facli other with llieir bauds. In what way were lliey care.'ising each ni'ijrr - ,''t"l>e u-ii-lifss here palled '.he Interpreter on Ih^ cheek J 'fiiey carei-st-d each other wilh Iheir hands. ' ' ,      ' What part did they touch?   On Ihe face. Do yon know Bergami's room at the villa d'Este' No, I cannot, there are so many rounis; they told mc that was liij room. After ihe return of the Princess ft-om Greere, does lie not know of any alleration in that room which he .'iupuu-ies was Bergami's ?-- Mr. Denmaa.oliiected lo the question. Mr. Park-1 will thank niy Learned Friend to slate 1m� objeclion. I\lr. Deuman reqlieslrd the question tc he rend nsfaio j which being done, tie said, ' That brings somct'iiioV I" liie knowledge of this jierson. He is nut .':uppi;.>cd to' h.iv,-known Ihe silualion of this room, but he at'l -ntarils s:iiil somebody told bim sonielliiHg. . lie is then ar.ked .is lo Ihe aiteraliun, and 1 apprehend lhal is-guing too far.. The Lord Chancellor Consulted with tlie .lutlire-' for n :-lini t time, and then said, the witness has said lliat lie .lus h.M-n lold tll.1t some room was Bergami's ; lhal dj�'s not prnve thi-fart that il was Bergami's, but lie may a-.k ine aui-stion, was there any alleralion made in that room he ivas tiHil was Bergami's room. Do yon know of any alteration in llut room wljrt'h you were told was Bergami's ?   I have not seen nny. Do you know any thing being done to ihe v.all hf'lhat room?   I have seen these caresses, iind I kno'v ,if nrfnlliir. Did you seeany thing.done to Hie wall, v/hjt h vim wt-ie told was Bergami's room-any work done? 1 Imve imt at present my    mintt" or" in my mind." Mr. Park said he had no more qiustioiis to a.k tiie witness; ami Mr. Denman said, we have nqqiicstionsto a^k I'rtc witness. The witness was ordered to withdr.iw. Aulonio Pianci was Ihe vcxt vnliicii ciJIed in, a7id was then examined hi/ Me .4tti>rney-Cien< r.il: Are yon an inhabitant of Como?   lam. Do you know the Princess of Wales?   I ilo. Do vuu remember when she lived at Ihc Villa D'Este ? I do.    ''    ' �  ;. there is a hew road which-Ihe PriuceSB has ordtre^tp^h't made, and has rut the road Ihroujh. .    . ^   - '. / Where were.they when yup first saw tlic^? T'ipt.'were ey .were going bpckwafiys; anu-forwao:(Ja.    ^. How were I bey dressed whei) yqn.'saw tljk'i6''St Clhis Me-irs.? . Both in while. / '� I: 'UpJ.^/'^-�  What sorljOf dress ?' 1 cannot tell, for f^i^d,'nbtji;d and touch thertt.? I camlnt *ay :whrfl|ierdi iviif,4tia''de''5ot-^ Wbut-; - ��-    ,-   '- ,,      V.';-' J-i'lt.-" (1 crp,tii1ipt1,pr lt,m7 linpti .in-4^1i,^'(�.-tn-^^''r fikr-^ .Wdjer, andibe .witriesfi/ls'-ajked.whellieyhe can 'say 'tltey.had , been in the wate?'or- not;   It is'nitejty impis.ible fur: |>in> to telt cx.eie|)t from'thf Bppearauce, ihid my Learned Fritml isjiiot lo iead^tp .that feBull by the q'uekltotj-be' put,- but lie onght to a^k'wbaMhal appearance was.        " " ' . .jTlii9.uhjcctiPn:*aB allowed.  1-^       ,'^' �' , i>id their,clothes;appear to be 'wet ? - They sei-jncjj' yet at top, but 1 caoiipf'tejl whelher'^tbey wire itfyi pr->rpl,-''for'1 :did not tu'ueh them.:'   i. ,,   '   V';,.� /       - .Dtd ttie'y get. iutp the canOe.wbeu tfie sair'ypu?' Tliey .;iiWbich weydid theygp? They camS'^Ooin , tlVe' iiti'^li canal, and then went Wtrards tbt yillar ', f Ttirij. ^   

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