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British Press Newspaper Archive: July 21, 1820 - Page 1

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Location: London, Middlesex

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   British Press (Newspaper) - July 21, 1820, London, Middlesex                                ^l MBER 5499. LONDOlNi^'PftH^YrJffeLY 21, 1820. rpHlS EVENING, FKIDAY, July 21, willi' _B.    be peifiiriiipa.iheiMusicaVEiHsrlaiiini^r'oTf L0\ C r AOGHS AT I Ot KSMITHS' V'lEiljWr. Hi(lini�>�pCirpiaiii Bcliliiif, ftiv: Bcrimrd ; Tot-lerioii, Mr.^Mmililliv-RHc; Mr. J; Russeli; Sdtomou Ltib, Ml'. Hamrooiid.-'livdia, Mrs. Gail'icl:. ; Aft�r.�-hicl). n OiimeJy. in three atts, called I.fi'rd Rovcrofi, ,Srt-'0 ourtRfr; Sir George Squaatter, Mr. K.iriisrrf -, Cinrlili'v; ^'r. Joiict; Major Dtinipliue, Mr. I'ar-Ipi';' Capism BibbM-,. i\tr.. Guniior ;Mr. Green, Mr. Terry; Clitsjetist, Mr.: VVrillhims.^ LRily ^S(|iiunrtcr,::Mi'g.'Goiiiior; Bi'rUia,,Mi3sLeiSl>;;Tuclieli-,M/s.Gil>l)s. : la which will.,lie.!>dilfil,:0'Kpefr'� Musical Farce of THE son in L/iW. Crankv, Sir. Uilijams,- Vliwgar, Mr. Voiniger; Bouquet,: Mr. Comer i,.-B�vvl:ilf,i^^kiil,:;ihal ibe^imbsr of Cianada, bolh.pak and fi          - - ...... scriptipuV:    . lirirtiiutoly liablet^^^^^^^^ .. .   .    .. RurwJ^of^i^iliilrttsi'" cwpe&lciw-ilii^^bii'^hearli^^^^ tliii'Cauad'a pine in, 6ow-' evrr,prefer�ble for its'wzei'fo'Hiiy Other furbowspri Is and mists, wbei>.htad(�orsiiielo^ti^' itr.4iV8$'.i $iths;iblinds,.Bild other oh. jecis where lighlAess and freedom from knols m desirable. Xndepeodenilv of fl�edifference-occasioned by the amnunt >of)dnty,>tbe .supply of- wood iCfnttr the:-Biiktp,' without ad. verlin^tu ita superior quality, can be jirocnrcd, from the difference in ihe amount uf freight and trfliispnrt, at a rale considerably'cbeHiiTer'than woQd frum^North America. As a cnroparative rttteof expense...however, necessarily differs according to the particular por^wliere the shipment takes placei'vour'CoromiHeeniiist: refer- lite .Hduse,'Upon this head.of-tb�ir. inquiry, to a -tables in-ihe-Appendix,: contain-ing an account which they are assured may be relied upon, of the prices oP-limber from each port, dislilnguishrng tUe duly,- frfig(it,rchargB(fy net. proci^ds, and Jirimftcosl �   HOUSt OF LORDS, TiiURsVAy JOLY 2^v#' " THE" Q(j'e'eN. '' '. On the motion of the .Earl. of LiV,Ettpo.9i'i.-�. Contnltlief was iipiioitited to search for (jrec ��{radatioti and Divorce bf i)tT. Majcsiv. The lolli.wmg Peers, Hinon^ otfier's. constituted the Cnipm,it.tee :-. the-, nt^^ of aimpcrliaps. eisewhei-^it (vas t09 neiieraHy arid Jjelieved, thptjhe iialh to obtain fudicial office 'flialfeijf.' TFornJerly', iWf.el|^, mvever,';been' the- means-of thdncmi;:a nidrtiVgrueral use (which no other circumstances could' have occasioned) ol Ciiiiada limber for Jiotise-hniiding lit tbis-cou^itf-y, particularly m buildings or an inferior descriplionj subject to all Ihe objections which are stated to allend it. In ship-build-iiig it'lms also been more employed llwii fiirmerly, and (he Com'thilleehavo-inaerled an account di^livei:ed in by, Sir Robert Seppings, of the cnmparntiye dViralion of frigates ' bnilt of Canada fir, and of fir from the northof Europe; but the useof Cannda'titinber is now stated to b^dis'coiiiinurd in his ftjajesly's dock-yards, in consequence of the unfavouj-ahle result experienced from its employment. The de-raand fdr wood from the countries iirtbc'iiorth of Europe has been progressively riimiDishing,.so as to'occasion great ..Interruption to the trade with these countries, parlicularly ivilh Norwily, whose inhabitants, liotwiihstanding the pre. dilection ihey have uniformly shewn.fur British mauufac-, lores, arc not only left wilhoul the meansrof c.4nsuming ' fliem, but of paying for those which they have received; .and for which nearly half a million is-staled to be owing; so that ihe expost.of manufactures has. been reduced to an extent which cannot be estimated merely by a reference to the direct exports to Ihosccountries, as it appears tli'it a considerable portion of the manufaclures consumed iu tlieni are introduced Ibiotigh Ihe German fairs. A considerable amount nf capital and machinery employed in this country in sawing.and preparing fur con-smnpliou the limber imported from the Baltic, has been in a jrrealdes'^e rendered useless and'unproiltictive. On the olher hand, a great and progressive increase Jf the trade wilh Canada,, and of the tonnage employed to i.mport its wood inlo this country, has taken place;'lihoiigb that which is apparent for the last two years, may in some degree be accounted for by the apprcbeiisiun which has prevailed, that tome alteration in the duties would take place about this time. There can be little doubt, that any material diminution of the duties on foreign timber, would almost immediately lead lo an increased demand of that article for most purposes of building, and enable the couhtries which produce it, but more especially Sweden and Norway, very greatly to increa^ their Consumption of Biitish produce. As Ihis circumstance; however, could hot take place without dimi-nishing the demand for Canada limber, it must iu some de-� gree affect the profits of the capital now vested in sfew-mills aud other machinery in Canada, which has been staled by a gentleman iolerested iu that country, lo consist of from 100,000/.' to 150,000/. ^ It cotriAj^wc be. Considered as directly �IFecling Uhe iiitefeatSlpt'l'Se taiiadian landholder, as Ihe value of Ihe timber ..sold at'Qnebec does not exceed by much the expense and labour of procuring it for shipment, and Ihe landholder bimielf getSilittle or nothing for the timber. Some portion of the shipping now engaged in transporting the Canadian timber to this country might probably be compelled 10 seek for olher employment; and although there is reason lo expect I bar I he increased supply from the North of Europe would be chiefly imported in British vessels, the average difference in the length uf voyage might render a sirialler amonnt of shipping iiecessar;' to carry on this particular branch of trade. But the Commilteu cuiinot persuade themselves that Ihe facility of prucnringahe best and cheapest commudilies front otltier countries, so essential to ihe Interests ^of commerce, can be found ulii-mately detrimental lo those of uavig-atiou and shipping, the great iuslriimeol by. which commerce is mainlained ; more-especially at a time when il appears by the coucuirent testimony of the best-informed persons, that the' rate of freight and other cii-cumstnuces altrudant on- British shipping, enable il to enter into a successful conipetiliou wilh Itiat uf cveryi other country on tiie globe. The Commillee, at Ihe same lime, indulge a confident hope lhat Ibe consideration of the state of some other branches uf trade in which ibey are ajbout lo engage, will suggest the means of giving ad-dilioial employment to the shipping of lliis country. The Commillee would by uo oieans however suggesl for the aidoplion of Parliaiiieui, any sudden -"alteratiou of Ihe exisli.ing system, by which wood, the j�rowlb of Canada, mighi be eiHirely excluded from the means of cumpctiliou in Ihe British market. Aud iliey therefore submit, that under all the circuniKlanies in which Ibis trade has origi. nated and been carried on, it may be still expedient lu cnmpensale 10 the Canadian niercliant and importer, by such limiled duty as may be necessary for lhat purpOse, ilie difference uf freight- and transport, so as to bring their wood inlo the -British market on equal terms wiih wood of the same dimensions the giuwlh of olher countries. But the Commillee are of opinion, tlwt if it should be found necessary fur purposes of i^eyenue, to let Ihe amount of duty ou foreign limber exceed what is necessary for the purposes they have described, il duly corresponding with Ibe difference should be.imposed on the import of timber the growth uf Ihe Ameri2:an Col.unies. Independently uf the above general considerations on the regulations of ihis trade, the Committee feel it their duty to notice two points of a 3ubordinale nature, in which it appears lhat some alteralion iu the existing regulatiun would ill any case be requisite. Il appe.trs that; from the same duly having been impo.sed in Great Britain ou deals Ironi eiglit to twenty fret, while in Ireland the deals were divided ihlo five classes, Ilje lowest of which was from eighl lo 12 /eel, the Norway deals, which are all of small dinieiistous, have laboured under an unfair disadvantage in the Briii'sh mai'ljet. The Commillee submit that it would be expedient lhat all ivood, Ibe growth of foreign countries, shoultl be admitted in.to this.country, subject to an equal proporliouaCe'rale of diily, and that fur iliis purpose a graduated scale, according ID tliecubical couleuls, should be ailopted. It appeai-R also, that according to.the'preseut mode, the standard biihdredof deals payl<;sVthan would becliargeahle upon an equa^ qnanlily: ofiSutid,fir. timber:.and.,the Com-niitlee are satisfied tliat Parliament will Ibiiik it eifpedieiit to remove �ibis impedieht'fi-bni -the eniploymenl of British capital in tawrmillsr by Rifkingithednty payable ou deals ut-leasl equivalent lu that fjn.tiniher in the log. The Cummiliee Ii'a've'ahnexed a cop)l of so'nibcli of the evidence as relate'slo the subject matter of this. Report. The Lord Chancellor, 1 br-Archbi^Gop of Canter-boryi -''.=. '  The JVlarqnja of^Lansdown, , Tl5^?aiiI ike llocids Bill, were aeverully read a lliird tiiue; and {lussed. IRISH CHANCERY BILL.  On the moiioii of Lord RiiDEaDALB. the floiise resolved itst^If into a Commillee ui�)�i the Inali Chancery Bill. Lord Redksdale, in the Coniraittee, coTn-plained of some of the clanstis of the Bill, which, though oT minor ira|>(j,rlance, he yet thouj^ht were objectionable. One of them went to abxlish a |jlace in ihe office of the Cuurt. Jf the place of clerk ill the oliice alluded to were aboliihed, and the Rfgisltr led; to do the biiwiiess, the |iui)lic would lose the advantage of the useful check wliicJi one of li.e officers wos upon t!ie olher.   . The Earl of LlMERICK said, that if the clause in question were left uiidisturljfd lu the 'Joiiiiiiu-tee. It would be open for the Noble uud L.-anurd Lord lo urge his objections upon the ttiird rciOiri!,', when he would be prepared to shew him, by u ference to |*roper documeiil.'i, that his appreiieiisiijns �, Attempted SBXCtt|Ej-4ry?Btei'ilayaficrnpou,,a .genteel iookihg young wonian, dressed in a |ilaCrCulo,u/eed sprig <mi i;{,�vii, sritis(:irrfj'Wlnte'sir^^^^ (-black ribboiiVduU'-Wacfc.j'eil'oyei^^^ her. could be obviated without the otuissioii of llie par- j ticulur clause. Lord Redesdale had no objection to defer tlii-^ part of the subject, hut there was another lo which he had to call their Lordships' aiteniioii. In Ire. land, a practice prevailed of tukiog out process and never proceeding subsequetitly in such -a iia^ hs to give the parties at^aiiist whom llie process was in progress any notice until .seqneatralioli was oblained, and ihe sequestrators made their appearance to take possession of ihe estate. In Eiigtind uo siu li practice took place. With a view of reuiedyina; this improper practice in Ireland, he shoulH suggest a certain provision, and for the present move lor the omission of all the paragra|ihs iiv the Bill, fioin the bottom of paae 28 down lo the bnllntn of pa^^e 34.. These paragraphs in the Bill v/ere accor ly qmitled,       .     ,       ->,'       -   '       -~ �      ' ^ The Noble and Learned Lord then proceeded to stale, that the only remaining material part of Ihe Bill to which he could not give Ium Hs^'ent, was tlie clause, that from and after the 1st of August iiexr, no person who is, ou shall be appointed a 'VJaster of Chancery, shall have the power of holdin^j a seat in the House of Common'*, shnulrl he be elected thereto, so long as he retains the saii! o'Hce of .V)-iS-ter. He had no objection to the principle of this clause, but he had to its ejc post fuclo oper-'.v.Y -was thr.Bu^jh Mbsmiciicy and corruprinn. �'F'ha"d^ "God ihst.roao loMhJ^ildgment seal Aas ho Imi-jer open-fkeur, hearj-^and the men vuho ex*-rc!-e.i �ocli runctiiiiis now were not only Vompel.^ni io li;l lliem by.their legal knowledge, biu who dUo ilid. Iioiioifr lo their atalinn by lln-ir impariiality and I'jcurrnplibilily. This was the prui>er (iiiiracler the-,' ought lo bear, and long, he Ira^'ed, wonlfl they continue to bear it; for he hated tlie incon.i Kruous inixliire of judicial office wiih any 'c'iiarar-er lor angry-politics.-{tlear.J-K liie'oii'e mn-it he Hiiemled Ifi, then lie would s-jy, let the'olher b� abrndoned.- /'Hear.J-It was said, liint if this clause remained in tlie Dill a inaiiife.�t ijijustice would be commitledajfainst Hie tJon?iJtneiiri who mil elected the Learned Gerttleman alluded ti> to DC tneir repiesenlative. Really he could not seii llie extreme hardship thus imposed n|ton the electors of Dublin. He should s^y lha'. if this clan"^ was not enacted, a much greater hard'Miip-wuulrl l.�; imposed ir^iou a large number of hii (onntrymeti, fur live millions of them would be deprived of then-claim Upon this Master in Chancfiy to perl'iirri tiie official duties for which lliey ji'iid him. He i wa'', therefore, slroiij^Iy of opinion, m every view he I could lake of this subject, that the clause was inu.'t proper, aiifl (int;lit nut tn be modified. He com. pliineiited the Noble and [^earned Lord {Redesdak) ou the intere.st he had lieretu.'ore taken in the provi-.nions of this Bill, at the same tune tt was e.xtrn-ordiiiary that this Biil siiould li.-ivc so ioiij^ slejit t.j their Lord-.liips' uible. Suiiie lime had uit'ervener) Mi.ce It. was drawn up under the siii)ervi>ion of a Noble and Learned Lord, and a Ma-ler of ihe Rolls ; 11. then lav fsr a lime unncln.-e'i, nntil ;t was brought III and pa'-^ed by the frish .Vliiiistrr in tlie other House, ]c tl'ieii remained ori tiieir Lorfl-sliips' table (cn- that considerulioii Ui which it wns eniilled at an earlier period. The Earl of p;;NSISK!Lt.EN cnnld not concur io the ptopruty of this clause, so iiroperly objected lo ill its present form by the Noble and Learn'^d Lord near him. He thought it very hard thai tlie Legislature should in this manner iHtei!'..-re and dismiss an individual from hi-5 office without any previous instruction, or ihe sligliltsi juii c-jusp.- He could never consent to harass an iniiividnal in this manner by an ex pout facto law. Thi'.-,- he -ihonghl, was bad treatment lo give the loyal ci>y nf Dublin, and the individual whom the <:\l\zt'j.i had elected as their member. The Nnhle Lo'd talked of the liartlsliij) dial would be iin(ui-.ed 'ipon live millions of his countrymen if this '-lause -.ver-f not pas.^eil ; he wished the Noble Lord's (.-ouiilrv-inen had olteiier the pleasure of seeing him araoo^^sl -Ihem to wiilch over their intere'ils. Lord (loi.LA.ND joined in liie sentiments of respect whicli were due lo the framers uf this .B^i!, but he lamented lo find that it couMined iwf little words which stariled the Noble and Learned Lord opposite.    The two llllle words " is, oa," had  this terrible effect__fA /ainf/i.y-Notw.'.h- slaudiiig tills alarming effect which they f.-id 'Jp'j'i the Nuble ami Learned Lord, he (Lord Holia-.d) could mil help saying, thai so far from piiv'-.c:-patiiig in this alarm, he lliongiit there wer�; in-j'y and powerful reasons which combined to prove iiec.-s-ity of ihe IjiII in ils present shii|)e. 1 claim< lor its pa'^sing were, he thought, Mrong i'nci unaiijweruble. In the first place, the clause, so I'u' Irom beiiiij a violation of uny principle, was, as indeed I he Noble and Learned Lord admitted, ^,
                            

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