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British Press: Wednesday, July 19, 1820 - Page 1

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   British Press (Newspaper) - July 19, 1820, London, Middlesex                                I i LONDON, WEDNE&D^Y;.ItJlT 19, 1820. ii        be itfrferthwlarComedv, in UireescU, called ' WmlE "botes WONDEtis; Or, THiE-m� TO WIN Hliff/ Olcl MiralicJ,aii-.-T�ifyv Vooiie Minib�lfMr. C. TCirmbl*} DutTieie. Mr,Jom'�;'JDosa'H^Mi-. Contior. lOrUna, Mlra J.fisli; Bizni-re, Mr*. GKei^WS(�('e5>illej .91^ JjJirta; Mr. Mutj Mf. W we^t io repeal the Act (>t tbe'^iL otGikvl^ U conimonly -calletf tlieVB/aV/�:'i4cy-.: -^'-^^^^^ " Thfe Mflrouis of Lansdowh coiicorreclin the suu'Kesiioi) of the NobletantJ Lenrned;liflni. The Bill was the^i.read the third tinteaiKl pase^. QAPJTALFBILONIES REPEAL iiLL. The Marquis of Lanspown nibved the Order of the Oar fur ihe third. r^adHi;g of the Capitui Fe-Ipuie* Repeal Bill... ' The Lord CaAlf^^LLOB stated, that he bad many objeciioiis tu t^f^ sweejii.ng way.of getting rid of long . existing %alj)te8i There was iio,way of iegiblttli^g on criini.n^t subjects but ]jy looking, at generat'ucts. The Legislature could not bind itself dawn Jo |d n.ltitiiiiteiy prove more effective for the preventipitQjfrpyiine. WiTh respect to the crime of kjllilig^an^!n|^i,tnt  there |iad^be^ii iii^h^'lasl -Sift y.e.ar^,:,o,tttIie Northern Circuit, 25 . comiblttaU for'thRl cM?ne/''two triajit. ilie of. VAUXHALL. , WFS EVENING, WEDNESDAY, July 15, . a GRAND GALA, comprising n Cnncerl of Miscellaneous Music. At the end of llie first Act Madame and ^Vlademoiiielle .Snqui, with Mademoisellr Adelle, will exhlbi.t their admireil Performances; and, at the cunclnsluii of the Cuiicerl, will .Micceed a forijliant display of Fireworks, by ."Signora Hengler, .when .Madame Saqui, completely enveloped in.u.voljiine.of iirs,will achieve he'r surprising Evolu-lious on 'the Tight Rope, at aii elevation of sixty fretfruih the ground. Admission 3s. (Id.-Doors open at Seven, (he Concert to begin at Eight o'Clock. CLOAKS poa THE THiEATRE-S, ROUTS, EVENING PARTIES, AND TRAVELLING IN GENERAL. ''TpHE Liidies of the I^Jolnlity and Gfiiiry are JL roost rCFpeclfullv informed,-4hat ahey will still con. ti.ine (o find; Ibe SHOW.ROtJMS of F. THOMPSON (hie ClemtntM;,;;jLn4Tii,At.G He w�fild'()ow iiiove.fiir a.r^Ur|t 6f the n�ihbef.or-thlp�'oP the: Ijne cttrrytpB^24-poauders on the main deck, anSt rrfgates no* Mil3-ingin his Majesty's yards),   He thought that this fcptlntiy was generally too tardy m following the measures taken by other powers/or nicrensing the s\ke and force of their ships, and,he made this observation with referepce parti'ciilariy to the size and Mrutiture of the vessels faiillt by.Amerfca. Revferring to a retprD wtiich he held iti liis hand, ttie Noble Lord remarked, that there ivere ships of (he larger SiiJe building, but not any two-deckers, which he Understood was the description of vessels of most general utility; and with regard to frigHte*; he observed, that there were no^eblJilding or ordered to be built, of the model of the Fo.-nqne, monnling fifty 24-pounder guns, which was, as he wns given to understand by naval officers, a very eligible class of ve�sei8 and quite strong, enough 10 cope with any frigate whatever.   Some ofthe frigates which were built were of too large a description, but the majority were considerably too light.   HiB view in moving $>r returns this eveuiiig, was with a design to see if apy propositiPn favourable to economy (*o desirable at this period) could   be  made.   He wished to   ascertain whether the navy bad   not been brought to .that state when a diminution of tjie expense  might  reasonably   be expected. From tbe returns, he observed a considerable increase of the expense as to timber, and a great diminution   under the head  of labour.   However friendly he might be to every practicable measure of economy, yet he could not approve of such a reduction ofthe labourers in the yards,-as might redder ineffectual any effort, should an effort fie neeessaryj' to increase pur force suddenly.' The Noble Earl strongly recommended retrenchment in every department. He observed, notwithstanding the impoverished state of the country, that the Estimates for the Navy this year, instead of heijig less, are oo! the.^hote\greater than the lasl year's, |)e_thpughrjt intj^^^ couiitry coil Id go on MVfi'itB' pi%8BBt immentie scale of expenditure; that ^88 as impossible as for an indivi'dual long ta-:(!pittinae-ia credit with an ioerea^ed expen-ditbre ind a diminished income. He expressed fit* hope that hii Majesty's Ministers would serionsty apply themselves to economise the expenditure of the country, not conienting, tliem-selvesi with merely loppiiig off some junior clerks of tcifitng salaries^, but seriously putting their shoulders to the wheel, aiid makiii": weighty re-1^ trencfaments in every department. He had iniehd-ed to have moved an humble Address to liis Majesty to thatjeffect, but declined it in consideration of the preoccupied slate of the public mind. Lord Mblyille said he was free to confess th.it the expense,of the navy, as it proceeded, oogbl to be oa a diminishing scale, and in every year now some diminution of the expense might be expected.   It was not to the number only, but to the durability and. effectiveness of our navy that we were to look.   Other coonlries usually fit their ships for temporary purposes, for a single voyage or other servicej but dhe British navy was out for years, on blockades of distant ports, and cruising in all parts of the world, a sort of service which no ' nation ever did, or eirer would go through.   From the i>sarcily of British oak, and the state of foreign trade at the close of tbe last war, an inferior sort had been resorted to, which had nccasioiie4 a deterioration never befote known.   Tlie Noble Lord bad observed that none but ships of the larger class were. building ; the Noble Lord had himself furnished a reply to the remftk.   The Noble Lord had acknowledged that we must build after countries with which we were likely to be in hostility, and 80'and ,86 gun-ships were the only description of vessels which the United States were now building; of tbe other classes we had none buildiug, because we had still a great number serviceable which w^feiihder repair, and the same observation applied to frigates carrying forty 24-pounder giins. It was very true as the Noble Lord had stated, lliat the Americans had built a epecies of frigate carrying 60 giins, but in the opinion of all the iiiival (Officers whom he (Lord'Melville) had consulted, ithe SO-gUD frigates itq which the Noble Earl lisd -alluded, would  not  be able  lo  contend with (them on any thing like terms of equality.    It .should  be  recollected also,  that   number  was required as well as force, and for the, protection of,our trade it was necessary to spread our ships, and fpr that description of service light vessels were the most effective.   Tbe frigates of fifty guns which were in our service were built of .fir.   The larger sum for'timber and materials, as compared with wages, was a mistake in the estiniHtes which were made out in u ififferent way from former ones, bat tbe mistake was now rectified.    The Earl of Darnlet said a few words, after which 'the papers were ordered. Lord Ellgnborouoh proposed an anaended clause to be added.to the Marriage Act Amend.infeui Bill, and jDoireci, on the pai't of a Noble Friend of his wfib^had-IjBft the Hbu.?e, tliat the Coininittee on ttie?1ipsttrt'iS Chancery Bit | Ireland) should be .p^tj^%d fiH Thtireday h ^ ��.'�,,.� ?^ v^ii^SiiSll^i^i^^ jlhe pot|>o�itenteni, DALi; participated^ the commttmeut of the Bill stood for to-morrow;(tbi� day.) ; , - , Alien act. Lord SlDJlOOTH, 111, rising j -i,igth iji hi^.oijserwM. �tions on iftfe Bill.,TheCrown pn!S,-e8sing thfe rtsilil -f ordering foreigner^ to 4"'' tiiiscooii.Uy, ^nd .of |>r ci/c.�Kis,taiices ssliicb co favpurable. jofiAnge had lalfeti pljice, and if t.h� ipgasyrie was ndvaiitageou* in 1818, It was ?qually_j�ri��iist .and. ,H;^%;|!�|jKyj*t,i,^,reseiit. This measure subjected the uliea \n lJ>e uecesaity of giving liis name to the ciistoni-hoose .-fficpr where he landed, who ftirnished him wiUi a cer'i-ficate, and then he was at libeny to !o any jiart of the country, and all that was further ,rtquire(| of him wi)S, that he sjip.uld uiuke a siu>iluiin>ii(J,ii wiis, tliat it liiiil not bee.n labu'ciJ, and it sUouUi Ije oil-served, thai not a sjijgle alien residrnl liad ben. sent out of ihe ci>ii.i;t:iry during tlinl lime. TIiosk per>oiis who C4ine from Napoleon Cunu.[)arle wrri-immediately seat away, so that not one re^idfivt had been molested by the o^;erat>on of the Act. Hi.i Lorchliip coiicUided by iiiovuig the rtcund readii;^ ofthe Bill. The Earl of DARNtEY said, tilut tile argnmenc of the Nuble Viscount, wliich went to liiiiil liini to vote for (l)is B,il|, if he had vot^d fur llie former Bills, did not apply, to him, us he iiud nut bfen present when^lhey were puj'Sed, o4- lie siiould Ct-r-lainly.have entered his protest against a nieii>ure which he considered as most di^'gracefol. Under the alarm which prevailed ay the tune af tbe Freiicti Revoluiioi), he had thep ihougbl it liis.^iuty to ^'llp-port the measure ; hnt^atter six years of prbfonnd peace, he thtmglit OQthiiif^ could be mote disgraceful than the maniier in which l-his Act hud been renewed year after year without any adeqna'e cause being she.wn. lie would aik if it wh>i possible to fonceive that the safely  pf this great country depended on the more or le.s" foreii;iiers that resided in it ? Thou^li he giu:e In!! creJil to the mild dispofitioii of the Noble Vi.-coiiiit, and his anxiety to exercise his powers ia the least oIj-noxious manner, yet the powers of the Bill were such as he would not intrust in any liauds. Tiit-policy of this country had ever been to cncnura-je the free egress -jud regress of fortrigners, but now, year after year, withoutany proof of dantjer, upon the bare assertion of the Noble Viscount, a men-sure was curried, which was not only injuririii!. to-WHvds foreigners, but militated against ihe principles of a free constitnlioii. But his great Dbjrcii'nj was to the manner in which it pl.iceii the i'miniry in the view of foreigners. He would nolsuli'l'r thr opportunity to ^la-is without entering liis [iriit^^r. against the measure, and he hoped auti trusted it wonid be the last time they would be called upon tu pass that or any similar Bill. Lord HoLl.iM) felt it necessary lo say a few words by way of entering Ins protest ngauist ihe Bill, but having ao frequently staieil his o|nnimis, and  placed them on record on iheir Lordsllip^* Journals, il bfcame the leas neces^niy for Inui now to .Hiate liis reasons for thinking Sills of tins n:ilure were ciuel, unjust, and impuliiic ; on all tlio-e great points, therefore, he would not faliKiie their.Lnrd-sliijis' attention, but on the manner in wliicii this Bill WHS brouglit forward he must lit-'^ to make a few remarks, though he felt it irk^,ome at tiiat lale hour and at (hat period of t!ie  Session to occupy   their  Lordshi(>s' lime.     Me   well   knew that the public mind, as his Noble Friend had observed, was engaged on oiiier subjects, biit lie was not Uibtt deterred by snch consuierHlions from the performance of his duty.   Ht: 
                            

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