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British Press Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1820 - Page 1

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Location: London, Middlesex

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   British Press (Newspaper) - June 28, 1820, London, Middlesex                                Number 5479. LONDON, WEDNESdm JUNE 28, 1820. '^h f Vniiinj; this Tliealre^liia Eveiiiiigr, and palrooiziog the rullowiiie Emeriahimoiils. rUEATKR.ROYAh. nnxJUY-hAVK, THIS FVENING.WEDNESDAy, J.me 28, liis Wajesl-y'H Servants will perform the Comedy of WILD OATS; OR, THE STiM>LUNG GENTLEMEN. WrGeorirc Thuiiilrr, Mr. Dnwlon ; Rover, Mr. Etliston ; Uariy TtimuWr, Mr I'enlfy; Ba�ks, Mr. Powell; Ji.iili Dory, Mr. Gallif, hnrnifr G;iinniiiii, Mr. Meredith ; JUmp, Mr. Keeify, Epliraim .Sinoiiili, Mr. Mnnilen; Sim, Mr. Knight, l-aiy Amnraiilli, .Mrs. W. West; AmflU, Mrs. Kuight; Janr, Mrs. ()r?i'h is fixed uwr tlie cork of each bottle. Projier Sjjouge "��ei are sold by Bayley and Blew, as usuiil. As ebure may also far ftarf. ���healicaifi} by a similar Stamp, HENRY'S CALCINED KIAGNEStA, in botllea at la. 9d, or with (lau itoppen al 4(. 64.     ; COUNTY FiKE OFFICE, REGENT-STREET, LONDON. TRUSTEES, The Duke Of ^ORFOLK, The Duke of RUTLAND, The Marouta of BUCKINGHA>f. The Marquis of NORTHA.MPTON, &c  &c. &c. And SIXIY.DIRECTORS. MANAOIlolid and permanent security to those insured. directohs, &c. GEORGE HOLME SUMNER, Es�f. MP. Chairman. WILLIAMJWARSH, Esq. Deputy Chairman. Paice 7d. DLORD. Se- Rt. Hon. ibe Vice-CIiancellor, Hon. Douglas Kinnairxl, Sir John C!oxHippitley,Birt. Sir Robert Wigram, Bart. William Agnew, Esq. Jiibn BHih, E.'>q. S. P. Cickeiell, Esq. James Henry Deacon, Esq. Francis Freeling, Esq. Charles Freeman, Esq. Neill Malcolm, Esq. Giorge G. Mills, Esq. Richard C. Plowden, Esq. Robert Taylor, Esq. John Varnham, Esq. Joseph Vt'iirner, Esq.  ' James West, Esq. Rd. Williams, Esq. Solicitor. RICHARD BARNES, .Senetaiy. On Saturday next will be published, in 8va. |;rice Is. fid. No. CXIX for June, 1820, of rpHE EDINBURGH CHRISTIAN IN- JL STRUCTOR: containing a Review of the late Dr. Brown's Physio.logy of the Human Mind, and a full and accurate Report of the Proceedings and Debates of the late General Assembly of (he Church ofSc.otland. Printed forT.Cadell and W. Davies, Strand, London ; and William Blackwood, Edinburgh. In a few ro4)riety of acceding to her Petition. Me had no difllicully in saying, that after the fullest consideration of all the subject, after exaininitig the proceedings now instituted in every porssible view, llie course originally (>ro-posvd Was the most titling that could be adopted, with reference not only to the iuletest of the illus-trious individual concerned, but to the demands of justice. As long as any hopes remained that this investigation could be avoided, it was his desire that the Committee shouhl not meet; but when those hopes were disappointed, he felt it necessary to id-here to the original course of proceeding. When this question Odine properly before the House, lie should then state his reasons for entertaining this . opinion. Earl Gbey then rose and said, under llie painful necessity that resulted from the anawe^ which the Noble Earl had just given to his question, he felt himself bound to submit a (notion to ibe House, for the purpose of relieving their Lordships from the embarrassments in which Ihey were involved from the course of joroceeding hitherto pursued. He ought periiaps to ufiologise to the House for presuming to set iif> his opinion in con-traJiation to their Lurdslirps' vole, and for suggesting to them the proprie.ty of reversing their solemn derision. It may indeed seent to savour of no slight degree of presuuiption were he to conceive that under such circumstances he could think of persuading them to adopt any other proceeding than that which Ihey had already sa(i(:tioned, and *hich in his mind would be more conj^tent with propriety and the dignity of their own character. He tnterlained no 8uch presumptuous notions, and however strong his feeling* may be of tht- itnpropriety and injustice of the original conrse of proceeding, yet, after it had received their Lordships' deliberate sanction, he should propose no alteration in that proceeding, if his proposition were not jiis-tified by uii alteration in the circumstances of the whole case as it stood ut present, from what they appeared when their Lords.htpa tame- to that decisron. Wheii first this subject' was submitted to the Houaei when it was piupo&ed to refer the contents of the green bagto a.Secret, Cotamitlee, various objections wer� Hi^btl.td such .a made u any given topic, that this adjournment should lake nlac.? for the purpose of Bscertuining whether the House of Lord* would originate any judicial fj-oceeding*. It was for I hat Noble Lord' 10 shew how it would be possible for Ihe Hoode of Lords to originaie judicial proceedings before their own body-(/jear) - but such was the- ur>e that ou^lit to have been pursued in the firi-i it�taiiCP.- /'Hear,  hear.)-Upon the  ronlingency of ll'.eir Lord�hip� declining, to inktitnte judicial proceeil-iiiga, that Nnhle Lord declared that he would step forth a� the Queeii'a public accuser.   Did not this intentiiai upon the part of a Memh�t of the Hnnse of Commons shew the probability of tlieir Lmd-sbifu being required toexercifS Iheir jiidirial fi.-iir-lions   upon this subject-(Hear.,  hearj-miii prove how cautiously they should abstain from all jireliminary investigation      The case di3'erf-d in tin respect,  whether the Report nf the Coni-mittee were in fuvour of, or prejudicial lo, her Majesty.     If   it   advised that   further   proceedings were  necessary,  it  would  be   prejudicial to  the Queen ; if the contrary, it would be prejudicial lo her accusers.    In either case Ihrir Lordships ought to keep their minds perfectly free from all knowledge of the circuinsiancea ef the case, for by such means alone could tliey honestly and coiiscienliously discharge liii-ir judicial tunctioiis. Tlie altered ctrcumtlances of the case alone ought to demand from their Lordshipi to rescind a decision, which, if upheld, must be inconsistent with the principles of justice, and prejudicial lo the public interests ; but if to these altered circumstances were added the general suspicion entertained of Secret Committees by the country at large, their. Lordships would see the necessity of revi.�ing their opinion.    Secret Committees were of J^te years too lonimon, and their proceedings  werfe-^f a stamp so odious as to excite a general prejudice ugniiist any case which iniglu originate in such a measure.-{Hear, hear, /(eor.y-He should be one of  the   last men  jn the   fJouse to advise their Lordships to yield to factious clamour, but he trusted it would not be considered a proof of any disposition towards a base and unworthy compliance, if he said, that although the perfortt;-ance of strict ju�lice was their first duty, they were likewise bound to administer that justice in a mode not calculated to excite a suspicion of their motives, or a jealousy or distrust in liiei^ judicial proceedings,- [Hear, hear.)-The Queen of England had lately appeared before theiii to a situation to which no other Queen of England had ever brea reduced-as a petitioner at their bar for justice. Her iVIajesty entreated them that they might fiitc her case in a train nf immediate adjudication; but that they should not institute a mode of proceeding which must of necessity weigh heavy upon her, by putting into circulation for some munlfn a Report, probably injurious to her character, not upott the respootibitity other peraoiial accusers, but with all llie influence that belonged to u Committee of that House.   He did not appear as, the Queen's advocate ; he knew nothing whatever of the merits of the case, nothing of her guilt or innocence.   He stood there as a Member of Parliament, arguing upnn a cusewhic'h was not a party qaesiion-(Lout/ cheers from both sides)-and  contending for the pure and unsuspected admioistralion of public justice.   He repeated, that be should nevj^ yield to faciious feelings, but he must look n^ffi respeLt to the feelings manifested strongly by the public hc larg'', especially when he found those feelings originated in the best and purest priiicipies uf our nature, in compassion, in generosity of mind, in hatred of oppression, in a love uf justice.   If these feelings were strong now, Iheir strength was likely tn he much  increased   in  the  present state a.f the question.   He would not say any thing of the offence charged, but their Lordships were bound Iol reflect that Ihey stood there in Ihe highest sUiioii in the empire, that ihey boasted a long and glorious line of ancestry, were endowed with wealth and honours, and ull those particulars which generally procured respect,  and were calculated, he hoped, lo maintain integrity;  they ought, therefore, lo be cautious how tliey brought those higlt qualities in question, and endangered their character in public opinion.-(i/eor, hear, heur.) - He trusted be should not be deemed guilty of any wish to say any thing offentive to their Lord�hip�, but he must tell them in perfect candour, that they did not stand high in public estimation as entertaining any desire to oppose  themselves in any particular to the  Ministers  of the   Crown. In  tiie House of Commons an opposition was raised to the   proposed   measures   too powerful to be overcome, and there the proceedings are still suspended; but when the same proposition was submitted to their Lordships, ihey paused not, they hesitated not, but instantly complied with the Ministers* request. How will such an event appear in the eye of the public ?   Will it not be imtne-dialely vaid, that the House of Commons have .some senile of public justice, which obliged Ministers to abandon their object; but the same proposition being made to the House of Lords, iheir Lordships wgre so entirely under the control of tbu Ministers, th|t they were content to forget their characters as'fudges, and to assume that of public accusers?-[Loud cries of Hear, hear, from the Opposition benches.)-Were their Lordships prepared to meet the effects of this contrast, and to encounter the suspicioit, he had altnost said th(�. execrations, of their fellow-subjects, the contempt of posterity, and of all parts of the world where � knowledge of the present proieedings could ever arrive?    And   all-for  what ?-(Wear, /leaV )- What advantages or cpiiveniences were 10 be derivid frotu such a course of procedure ?   He would almost consent to surrender all the points of constitutional principle; for which he had been conCend-iogi'if it could "be shpwn that any luiid or even spKcious advantBg^boiild be derived from the pro-   

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