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British Press Newspaper Archive: May 17, 1820 - Page 1

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   British Press (Newspaper) - May 17, 1820, London, Middlesex                                NoM96ii 5443. THBATRB-nOYAt, HRVRY-LAilB:    ' THIS EVENING, WEDNESDAV; M*y |7.' Ilia Majesly'i Sei^anli wiJi perWrui iVie Trajerfy       KING LEAR. KtafXear, Mr.Kean; Duke of BurKandjr, Mr. M*Keirn; T)uke uf Cornwall, Mr. Peplry; Dake of AHbany, Mr. Tijoniptna; Earl of Glo'-ito', Mr. Hullsnrf; Earl'nf Kent, Mr.PoiK; Edgar.Mr. Rae; Edmund, Mr.]Biro*:d, :Go(i�ri!j Mn. Glomj RegW, Sin. E^ertve j Cocdetiti| Mr*. H'.-Weil. After which .(4th time), a nev Mutical Drajsitp. io two Acts, called the lady aND the devti.. TTiWtuVe, Mr."Elli91on; Jrr�my; Mr.Harley; Bigirtir'Ra. fael, Mr.'Gallie; Chiudiaii, Mr. Barnard. ZcfibyriDa, M4�t Kelly; Negombo.BIra.Bland. ^ To-inarrow^ TheHanoled Totter, \nth The Lady and the Uf On Friday, Kio;r JLear, visXi. The Lady ^nd �he Devil. On Whit lUTonday/A new Tragedy, enlilled KirRinius,,or Tde Pall of the Kceillviri, �� whiich Mr. Keaa will sutlaia fhe (irtncipal chiracf�r. :  - j�e^^^ THEATttB-ROYAI., COVBNT-aAfiDJ^X. THIS EVENING, WEDNESDAY, M�y i?. .will be produced, first :tlitte, a aev Hiitoricat Tragedy, called VIRGlNfUS: Or, THE LIBERATION OF ROME. Applus Claadiiia, Mr. Abbott; Virgiiiiua,'Mr. ^lacready; Icilius, Mr. C. Kemble; Clandiaa, Mri Coiiuer; Sicciua DMjlatus, Mr. Te.'ry-; Nunietorius, Mr. Egertoa.   Virginia, Wiss Foo'le ; Servja, Mrs. Faucit. The Prologue to be spoken by Miss S. Booth; the Epi-foj^ue by Miss Brunlon. After which, the Faree of HONEST THIEVES. Colonel Careless, Mr. Connor; Ca( their approbation, and'tu be Sold by Messrs. Tbym,]Ro>'lij Panton-6lreel,)l1y, thitt the'Noble liofii Who (Ircient^ ihe' Petiuott -Iiad taid trdriy- thst his Miijeat^'ti Gitvernjneiit wprt m�st ahxirfiM logiVa efl'eCt lo iHe fiilfeat'ihq^irf ftitct tH^ general objet-lD vrbicb iKis qu'eatioii Jiii^viMl. Aod ill tttiother jjWet'�� ittquiry �U alrendy fixed ibIo one ^^i'eat briiiehof thin hubjei:t. ' If tJtiW mat-Ut of cousideraiidii wlifctliiei" un4u^iiitr^'l&r tili^yine inirpose uliuold alsti l� Vii�ultq4ieojU||r ibipiaM'by their Lordshit>sr.   If NpliWi^^^^^ �mfli Tt �leii vxpedieiifi 1ihe comprehension of the people.   A duty more sacred lhau that could not devolve upon any Oovernineut. Ii was, he confessed, too strong f�>r his ahoulders, though he was determiucd lO undertake the task, as it was not now likely that any one more competent would call on their Lordships toidvestigate lhe^ub-ject. The Noble Marquis concluded .by givttig notice uf his motion for the appiiintment of a ConiiHittee on Friday se'nnight to iuvirstigate the question. The Earl of LlVEKPOOU intiinated that on that day he would stat^f generally his yiewa upon this ipiestion, without opposing sucii. s inotioti as that ulluded la by the Noble Marquis.. Wluit exlen-tiqii the inquiry may be snsceptihle of, would., of COur�e, remaiii u tiiutter for'fiilure coiisiderntion. But^be fully agre'ed in the expediency of considering the general stale of tlycountry,' Earl GsosveNOft wi*fcd lo tfijorW witellier this inquiry was ro be linjited tothe stiite of the iBanu-fiicturers The einbarrasgments of tIte.BgricoUural interest were equally as extfeosl^e, �iid thought entitled to the sstiiie eoiisi(lerntibii.--/'/l/eor.y The Earl of LlVERPOOI. lifaterviid. that tite motion of which Untice had been ^rtu = more iipecifi:-catly teiP5rred to tire cuirinierciiif itttert^ii, but he toa� ready to adinilfbat ia Wr gemrrtrt view of lifie �u4>}ect it WiTOld be iuettabeht'�j|i <^Bt:ii�jr.##k'^. rerred ininHi�ii^'�6i >.i�ili^ � kHWiisaiAii, it did iijft ; tlie�f�.re'fcUio�� ItialiVrtW'tfrqrtitjrSfeiiIH in'llife-ifiiSt4' i*4tniire be eitfiide^i tiliilj iHt!�gir*ed in ihelptOto fifiety of begiadiri^'i^lb'8 -diitiiiiit and ^eJBned object. The Marquii of LumBOtTN concimed in tim neeeiflty. atid aaid te.We^l to ibaiDi'tiis itfotioti �(A�rdtiigly. Uiid(Alkedli''4ie IboOght tkat Mle t*1i%^ the agrici�ltdWtijitel(*�tii otfght4o be fdUy kie^it'ediuto, bat it#��>iii^q�t desin^iteitM- tliejit-tet^foeKrt of a t>'a^litat' rtsllfj' tbit ibe intjtiirret shMdd be >Ub>dividedibt6�epartttie^rt^^(<2iftf.) 0�lrt!i*wieCI�5r itfvestigatipti 'Woutd be eftd�e:�*i\^iii�d'^ ixtr^iled by eveJ-y spetiea of t^ieoiry; �o aS nj-ifeii. def Jt'^i�H;iOi�sft|fe til oblaiii iHSyjpipifericat'refdfc ' i�il(l<3ft ^Mtt'^il^M{w pWdfidrt'-StitriMd be dj>tinefi '^ntfie *i�iiRd-*a�^ ^ thaf'Wben^t was Entered ii|ioti; ittiboUld lidtbe un-derafeod as exclodiifg the other.-^/'^ieiirr;J The �arl of LAttbEttBale agreed that a gieneiriEti inquiry couid alone be deemed satisfactory to the country at large. His opinions vpon'Corii Bills and the state of agriculture generally' were well knoWn ; and be im|iloreil rheir Lordahipi*, as they valued the tranquillity of the country, not to enter upon such a topic in the present iit'ate of public feeling. Nothing could be more fatal to llie peace of the community thai! the'agitation of that ques--tion now. Of course, in the general discussion upon the slate of the country, tlie agricultural interest must be incidentally touched dpon. Although he tliouglit the inquiry might be entered upon to conciliate the public mind, yet strll he augured very tittle from the result. The Committee would be beset by crowdsof witnesses, bearing facts of all sorts, and sowing the ifeeds of endlesi fatUre jealousies and itissentions. He approved of the line his Noble Frteud (the Marqnis of LtHiSdowii) had chalked out for himself, though he thought it the dirty of Government to have erfe now begun an active iuvesiigation into this most irtiportaitt subject. The great use that, in his opinion. Parliament would be on this oc(;asioni was so to cliissify and subdivide the subject as X6 render the parts of which it was com'posed less intricate than they were when mixed up witb the general mass. The Executive Governmeirt could alone conduct this inquiry usefully, fur they mast be possessed of all the necessary in^riUalipn, much of which it would liot.be advisable'perhaps for them>io disclose. He therefore joined bis Noble.F�iend in stTont;ly imploring iMd'Majftsty's iVliuistets tfftake the subject U|j themselves on their own rtspoiisibility,-[Heaf, hear.) The Earl of Darnlgy also thouglit the inquiry ought to be general; but still when he gave thiti opinion, he very'inach feared that it wjis out of the power of PariTatOeiltt^libwever well dispoiled, to apfjfy anf ellemianfgtocdy; Tfiir-^ffs btSTifta cotr-viction ; the state of the country was so dipplorable, he should be glad if the result proved his opinion erroneous, but he feared the result would fully sustain ir. L6rd Erskine agreed that the stale of the agricultural interests ought to be considered as well as every other, and that this would be best effected by keeping that branch of the question in a separate and distinct shap^. He thought Mt in the power of the Legislature to apply a remedy tothe agricultural interests, at once easy, simple, &nd cotn-^iletely efficacious. The Earl of Dt>'Nt>uc!hmore was fully persiiad-ed thiit it would be impolitic to hold out any hopes to the country of the probabli: result of their discussion, unless their Lordships had fully made up their minds to enter into a comprehensive ittquiry. They ought to make up their minds as to what relief they were prepared to apply to any part of the ekisling grievances; this was   mbre particularly rendered necessary after what this night had fallen from one of his Majesty's Miiiislers.   The Govern-tnent had now avowedly thrown off the inquiry from theOiselvies; he was heartily sorry for it, because they had more means, inoreinftuence, more efficacy, and he gaid it respectfully, it was more theiir duly than it was that uf the Noble Lords who sat at the same side of the House with himself.   No greater duty coulil devolve upon the Miuistersof the Crown than this inquiry, and b^ them ought it tu be undertaken fur the satisfaction of the country.   There Were rtiany persons who were doubtless acquainted with the general state of the ii:ition, but who had not the same oppOitunity as his Majesty's Ministers had of being conversant with all l!ie details of whidh the Government must, cr at least ought to be, iu possession.   What Ministers brought forward was sore to be adopti>d by Parliament, though he feared that what originated at the side of the House where he sat was in general sure of meeting nothing but a negative.   Ministers, in the way in which they   seemed   disposed   to  treat  ttiw  question, were not cerlniBly doing their duty in Ihe itian* ner which he thuiJght would  become them, for tliey were casting oft' upon others a^ task which they    ought , Iheinselvea   lo   uiidertake,   if  it were meant ta be efficaciously accoiiiptished. Did Ministers think the stiite of the coontry incurable ? Were they prepared tu make this avowal to the manufacturer and to the agriculturalist >   Were they prepared lo SHy that they had no remedy, no cure fur the distresses under which the people so universally lub'uured ?   Or was it potsilrte that Ministers thoiight they had rfiapatched the business' by this night's conversaitioti ?   He realty must say he did i>t)t think they seeiiied to have that injportanl �ei)�e which they ougtjt to feci of ihe�r official reapcinsi^ bility.   Minister* might agree ojioii >.ntne specific plan; it looked indeed as if his Notile'FVieuds were not eiiactly prepared ti agree iipoir^oue, for they seemed aljeWdy disposed to ilij^er ii[ivii ttie reuiedy at the outlet.    He. coiKiluded: by rViter�fiiig,that Government ought Xb take Ihe aubjeci sVr.ooi.ry up; it was their diStj to do so, uud the cuuinli''y expected it ffum tiieik. ' Th� Kkrl of liirfeft^oot^ said, tliat he w�ed' it tcfeiimtH' ttf Hay iftw^OTdriifter wii*i'had fafleu 'firom tt�e Noble,fiari �hti hnA jdst �at d^^rn. ITr '"'tti^UMfpoio^ thought liet�iid diJiincrly stated. iiitentida to eiiter generally into the qiieati�p. lirheft it w�� brougbt distinctly hef^te their Lor 1-iiiiftt.   But it wds said that hi� M'Je�y'� (VlinUters .Atigbt to comiGtoce tlie investijgd'ion.   llr folly agreed "Uiat it Wits the idtperative duty, of Veriinaent io examine Beriou>ly into 411 the fBiiits eohnecled with so gi^^e a'question, and that irfli^J' had liotipquired into therti all, they inrtitred i httacH df tbeii- dtoiji   bat if ihey, 1cnoMih| ihe iaeaoa of JD�ertig4tiOh at their da|id�ie the expected beheficitd tejliltu Were doubtful ifiib unattainable. Let fhem Ihofeto llteij- Statute-book, and see v�l>at had been doite there in past and with the best intehlionB, to reifaedy evils ii� trade. The complaint Wottld then appear, lhat io stead of being chargeable with htiving done too kiltie, th<'y hud in facittlone far too ftitei-h.-'(//i^V, hear.)-When the l4'?e�t�on rfegularl.y ctime tinC:ip>>-of justice  ought'   tbis inequality   be suffered ? Why   should it be  felt by  that clart  wliicfi waa the inost substantial resource of the coiiii-try,    aud   was quite   independent   of foreig;n trade, or foreign   markets ?    The ioduceiheiiu of high wages and idleness had drawu a coti^ siderabte number of the labouring poor to liia-nufacturing districts, where the greateirt possible ehcouragemeuf was held to marriages, for tfie children that rei^ulted, instead of being* bilidea to the parents, were at a very tender age a source o| absolute profit to them at some employment in t1^ roantifactories. Froip this sprang thiit stijijeraBupdr ant population, for efoi la^'ge a porlitin of whl^H npit^f ploynient could pow be,found. Mi/erubte, iQ^etd, inu�i be the sitdatioii of that peopli-, when their Government deemed it a boiin to Ihem, und whiatbi-y aci^epttd it at such, to be exp.>t tuied' trooi tKe.; homes, arid pfaced upon a distant sotl-a r^jqaovitt that in former'.tioaes, to far froiB bfiiig coa^^ti^t^ a booii, would' .be deemed, a severe .pii�ii�|jpenn If wat in the large manutiactDfiug tfJMific^ tfhaf �ll the facilities were ibund of ceiigregiiii;^ Urjiie biodiet of ateo/together at' .atiji^y'*; c^h . |v �a a^ricsUiifal' dittticl it woul'^ ii'trye b^^'ii^.   

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