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Atlas: Saturday, December 22, 1838 - Page 1

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   Atlas (Newspaper) - December 22, 1838, London, Middlesex                                TRANSMISSION  OP  "THE  ATLAS"  BY  POST TO   FOREIGN  COUNTRIES. We are induceiJf, ly numrout appUcalioitt on iMt luhject, to state, for the information of our Suhtcribert, that " The Atlas " may he transmitted free of postage, through the General Post Offices, ,  , ta tho following places i Ahtiqua        Bbbbiok     BtibnosAtbbs     CBraALOKiA,     Dbuekaba     Gibraltab        HA.mbuboh      Jamaica Nbvis Qvbbbo St. Ldoia TKiNroAD Baoota Beemdda     Canada Colombia        Dbnuabk       Gb'bnada (New)    Hbligoland     Laqdiba Newfocndiani)     Spain (via Cadis) St. Vincent's    Zantb Bahamas        Bbazii.s      Caba'ooab Cobp0 Bominioa       Gbbeob Honddbas        Malta New Bhonswick    St. Domingo Tobaoo Babbadobs     Bbehbn      Cabthaqbna       Gdxhatbn       Fbancb Halifax Ionian Islbs    Montsbebat    NorA Scotia        St. Eitt's Tobtola " The Atlas" can also be transmitted, upon payment of one penny, to India^-Capb op Good Hofk-^Nbw South Walbb.   To all other places it may be forwarded upon the payment of two pence. No. 658> Vol. XIII,] SATURDAY, DECEMBER 22, J838. [EARLY EDITION IN TIME FOR PO ST THE ATLAS OF THIS DAY CONTAINS; paob The PoUtlctaa................801 East.Indian and Colonial Atlas. .802 EorelgnNowB ................ 803 Ireland........................ 803, British News..........804 l.aw Reports...................804 JtoUte Reports >.............   805 Accidento.and QIFencM ..,..... 806 Qinniiiin.'...................... 806 Theatrical Intelligence.......... 80T gatttrday> News............80T 80r Weeyy Bbtrospect of. the Money leading Articles' !!!!'.*.!!!!!!.*.' 808 �Lav of Libel...................808 iMemorandaon Men and Things.. 809 Theatricals.................... 809 Mdlte; Rachel at tho  French .'Theatre....................., 809 litebaturb. neasods forltefusiiig to Sign the V Lay Address to the Archbishop "of Canterbury: with Hints for Increasing the Stability and . V^ness of the Church of England. In a Letter to a ' Friend. By Thomas Edwards, LI..D........................ 809 � page L'Art Oonsidgr6 comiiae le Sym-, bole! de I'Etat social; Par M. LoulS-DOBsieux.... 810 Egyptas it Is in 1838. By Thomas " Waghoi:n,  Steami Agent in Egypt...........:............ 8U Pictures df iho; World at Home ; and Abroad.  By the Author   -, of " Trimain," &Ci........ I.. 811 The Hugttenbt: a Tale of the French Protestants.   By the  Author of" The Gipsy," " The Robber," &c.......... 811 Music and Musicians........... 811 Fine Arte...................... 812 Literary and Scientific Institu- Hons ......v.................812 University IntelUgence..........812 The Navy....................812 Gazettes........................812 Births, Marriages, and Deaths .. 812 Banking and Monetary Atlasi .�> 818 Bill Brokers................... 8t8 Christmas Boxes.......   .Bl� The Bank of .EngUmd and ;thO ^ Cotton trade................. 813 The Markets.......;.........i. 814 Adrertisemenu.............;.815 THE  POLITICIAN. law of criminal information. Times.-We cpnfess.that the result of yesterday's trial* of the case in which this journal-was concerned has .struck us with surprise; not unmised with indignation. We will therefore abstain, at least, at present, from any oomment on the proceedings, the entire report of which we had not an opportunity of reading till, a late hour ^aat ^ight. We shall content ourselves with referring our readers, to the zealous, able, and manly address of the Attorney-General, and to that what shall we call it-the sumining up?-;nb; the zealous and'hostile reply made by the learned and noble Chi^f Jujltice to the powerful speech of our distinguished advocate. .From the Attorney-General's appeal we extract' one powerful sentence' descriptive of the sort of process to which we were yesteirdajr .subjected-a process which jnade it a matter of impossi-^biUty for us to call, a single witness in ex|tIanation or justification of -the statenient which we had published. Le' bur readers attentively peruse this short passage:- But, genttemen, I think that it is not creditable to the law that the truth should be exclu'de^'; tl^ai a counsel for the prosecution, Wie my learned friend' Mr. Theslger, should And that the only'qnestlon which a jury has to determine i� to this-whether the publication contaiifs a ohailge that is defamatory; and that, although there miglit be witnesses to proTd iu every respeot the trutb of the allegations, even from the mouth of itheprosecutorhinuelfi atill that it would bethe duty of the learned judge to Zf>iect that evidence, and to iSay that.he can onlylwhen ,the case comes before a jury see itrhether the publication is brought hoipe to the defendant, and whether it will bear the: construction put on it by the prosecutor. Now read 4the defence of this sort of investigation (P) put forth by the Lord Chief Justice :- la a proceeding by way of criminal information, the only questions whioh'you, gentlemen of the jury, can have to determine, are tl^ese- the &ct of pubUoation, the identity of the individual referred to^ and the construction: wliich the; libel can fairly be considered to bear. The mafn question, therefore; for you to consider on the present occasion is whether the libel, before you carries witlj itthe defomatory; charge of which the prosecutor complains. . Had the preseni proceeding been one by way of indictmentrt^e question of truth or falsehood must have beeui from'the very otttset,:^together laid, aside.' Likewise in a caseof criminal information a jurymust leave the question of truth or �ilae-hood equally out of vievsr.    � His lordship proceeds to state that-r- At the preliminary stage of the present proceeding, before it was ripe for the consiueratiba of a jury, the defendant might have offeri;d evidence to the Court of Queen^s Bench to show that the allegation of the proseeutoras to its falsehood was without foundation. 4 His lordship must know that we had no such power We could not compel an affidavit: we could not compel the attendance of a single witness, or examine one if he had.attended in any stage of this monstrous proceeding by criminal information. We were by the very form of the process gagged and bound hand and foot. Our advocate alluded to two cases where the prosecutors, not availing themselves of the enormous powers granted by this anomalous form of action^ came themselves' into Court and submitted themselves to the strictest examination on every point connected with the case in issue; bm Lord Denman, who was counsel in one of those cases  be. forgotten that as i^dvqcajt||t of peace and professors of economy, the g6vemments of the last seven years have had their hands,tied. Within that period taxes have been -reduced to the amount of six miilions, and until very lately nothing has appeared in the movements of foreign nations to awaken any jealous apprehensions. Since 1836,, h�iwever, the pavyof England has been strenj^ened in the numher and force of the ships in commission;, and a large fleet, has -been hrdug^ht forward and partialhr prepared for sea, as " demonstration ships," which might tie fully equipped at a short notice in the event of emergency. The Whigs have also added 5,000 men to thi^ navy^ and introduced the extended system of apprenticeship, thus providing for the rearing of seamen attached to the service; and j>erfectly acquainted with their duty. By them; also; the seamen gunnery has been brought to a state of peirfectioni and the ordinary has been rendcrent efficient as a provision for manning seagoing ships, and whatever may be said as to the ad.vantage or disadvanta^j in a scientific point of view of the system of ship-building introduced by the present suiveyor of the navy, nobody can deny that he has constructed more formidable fighting ships, and rendered the same class of llnglish vessels better able to cope with those of foreign powers. * * * Let us refer to the grossly-exaorgerated statements which have been put forth respecting the naval force of other powers, merely premising that we make no assertions that we are not prepared to prove by reference to public documents or other satisfactory evidence. First, then, we are told that the French navy exceeds our own in numbers and strength.  What is the fact?  France has forty-nine sail-of-the-lihe, including aill that are in commission, building, ordered to be built, or are mere hulks. England has eighty good line-of-battle ships in a more or less serviceable state, besides hulks, receiving ships, coal depots, &c.  Of these eighteen are first-rates, carrying fjrom 104 to 120 guns; and twenty second-rates, of from 80 to 92 guns. Again, we find it stated th^t the French ships are nearly all new, when the fact is, that only four sail-of-the-line have been lauched from the French arsenals since 1830, a period of eight years,'whUe no less than 30 of our ships have never been to sea since they were launched,. Further, instead of 22 sail-of-the-line in commission, as stated by Mr. Urquhart, and re-echoed by the alarmists of the press, France has only 11 in commission.   England has 21. Nor has France increased her navy since the war, for in 18l6she had 72 sail-of-the-line, while at present she has only 49, 12 of which are building, and a great majority of the remainder would require repairs before going to sea. As to the United States, it is seriously affirmed in some of the journals, that the American navy exceeds our A>wn, though' 12 sail-of-the-line are all they possess, including those building on the' stocks and decayed hulks, and the federal government'has only two sail-of-the-line in commission-.  With respect to Russia, her fleet in the Black Sea, which last year was composed of 12 sailrof-the-line; since/reduced by the storms of last summer to 9, must be accounted as nothing while Turkey has the command of'the Bardanelles,' and continues her friendly: relations with England.  Her Baltic fleet 'two ye^rs since muste^d 28' sail-of-the-line; hut it is well known that many of these are cra^ ships, utterly unfit to leave the Baltic; and it may be salelv said that 15 sail-of-the-line are as many as' Russia could trust on- a voyage into the Channel, for if ever so quixotic, she coul�I not leave her own coast altogether unprotecfed^   And is England, which the world could not bow, to be frightened at the idea of 15 Russian line-of-battle ships making their appearance on our shores? Our tars would soon give a good account of them.~The: following statement compiled from officii sources by an old and valued navdl correspondent, will show that we have not exaggerated the present force of the British navy :  BsmsH BBIPS OF TBS X.WB HOW IM OOUUIBBIOM.' ' Britannia v.'it'.v.120  Howe..............130 ' *Royal Adelaide             110    Princess Charlotte .... 110 � Rodney..............   98    Asia................   84 Ganges, ..........**  M Vanguard ...k........  80 HtoUngS..............  74 Malabar .............. :M Melville .......74 Pembroke ............  74 Bossell ..............  74 Wellesl��y ............ 74^^^ Belleiopbon.......... 80 Edinburgh .......... 74 Hercules 74 ComwalUs '74 Mfaiden.............. 74 Sopegal............ 78 'Talaven�............ 74 Total, j81.^  In port, and co^ hiXdiiif in a week-the rest at sea. VBHONSTSATIOM SBirS IH ifftiixittji mVAli^ AMD FOB OQM* UI6SIQK. St. Vineent .........i ISO ^Camperdown.�.......� 104 Powerful..............  84 Thunderer.........;.. .84 Bellisle      ...........  74 Benbow..............  74 Hawk................  74 Caledonia............ 190 i Impregnable'          ; 104 Calcutta'............. 84 Agincourt............ 74 Bevenge;............ .79 .lUustrlous .... ..... 74 '   Toial, 13. neveratsea.  New ships, TBB FOLtOWIHQ OODtD BB GOT BSADT Ik'a. VBW WBEKS. Royal WilUam........ISO    Hibeniia............ 120 Nelson .............. 130  Neptune.............120 Prince Regent ........ 130 Waterloo ...........130 Formidable............  84 Clarence..............  84 ^Bombay............., 84 Foudroyant .........80 * JHew ships, never at sea. '  .TBIBD BATBS.   j Royal George........ 120 Queen Charlotte ...... 104 Vengeance .......... 84 Motiareh 84 Cambridge .;...;.... 80 Total, 15. ' AchiUes.............78 IITellona ..............  74 Blenheim............  74 Defence..............  74 Egmont..............   74 Implacable...^Y.......  78 JSent �.'...�..�....�* . 78 Marlborough..........  74 Stirling CasUe ........ 74 Warspite.............. '76 Imaun......viV�......  74 Aiax................ 74 BlackPrince ........ 74 Camatio ............ 74 Devonshire .......... 74; Hogue 74 Invincible............ 74 Medway............ 74 Minotaiir ............ 74 Sultan .............. 74 Wellington .......... 74 Total, 21.  New ships, never at sea. N.Bi A few of the vessels on the last list may. require some repairSi', but on an emergency the.whol?' might be. sent to sea for a service �)f two ,or three years. In fact,, worsosbips than any of these were sent to the East Indies during the last war. . � ON; tbb Stocbs.--The Nile, 92; and London, 92; might be launcbed'; at a few days' notice.  The Royal Frederick. 120; Indus, Sfr; are ordered to be launch^ in April next.  The St. George. 120; Tht(Ug4r� 130'; GoUab, 84: Collmgwood. 84; Bosoawen, 70 v and Cumberland^ 70; are building, and in a state of forwardness. STATE OF THE COUNTRY. MoBNiNo Chbonicle.--"We regret to find that the magistrates in the neighbourhood of M^che^ter aro charged with reluctance to discharge their duty.   Tliot   

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