Atlas London Middlesex, December 1, 1838

Atlas London Middlesex

December 01, 1838

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Issue date: Saturday, December 1, 1838

Pages available: 16

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Publication name: Atlas London Middlesex

Location: London, Middlesex

Pages available: 31,747

Years available: 1826 - 1869

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Atlas (Newspaper) - December 1, 1838, London, Middlesex TRANSMISSION OF "THE ATLAS" BY POST TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. Wt are induced, by numtrous applications on thi$ tubject, to state, for the information of our Subscribers, that " The Atlas " may be transmitted free of postage, through the General Post Offices to the following places : Antioua. BBasiOB BrENOs Aybbs . Gefhalonia. Dehesara Oibraitak Haububoh Jamaica Baqota Bermuda Canada Colombia Denmark Grenada (New) Heligoland Laguiba Bahamas Brazils Caraooas Corfu Dominica Greece Honduras Malta Babbadoes Bremen Garthaoena Cuxhaven France Halifax Ionian Tsles Montsbreat " The Atlas" can also be transmitted, upon payment of one penny, to India-Cape op Good Hope-^Nbw Soutu Walks. To all other places it may be forwarded upon the payment of two pence. Nevis Newfoundland New Brunswick Nova Scotia Quebec Spain (via Cadiss) St. Domingo St. Kitt's St. Lucia St. Vincent's Tortola Tbinidaji Zantb No. 655. Vol. XIIL] SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1838. r EARLY EDITION LIN TIME FOR POST. THE ATLAS OF THIS DAY CONTAINS :- PAOE ThB PqUtlcIan................753 Eut Indian and Colonial Atlas.. 754 Indian Omnium................754 FoTeignNews................ 754 British Mews...................755 Itfeetings......................755 Lady Hester Stanhope's Manifesto against the World............755 Ireland........^...............756 Scotland.......................756 LawBeports...................756 ^Police Kepotts................757 Accidents and OSbnces..........758 Omnlom...:....................758 Theatrical Intelligence..........758 Srtiuday'sNews................759 WeeUr Retrospect of the Money Market;..................... 759 Leading Articles..............769 Irish Eloquence on the Tithes... 760 HemorandaonMen and Things.. 760 UtBRATURI. AxeL From the Sw^ish of Esaias Tegner. By H. O. Latham, U.A., FeUow of King's College, Cambridge.............; 761 PAGE Poems: The'Maid of Jaen; Ti-men; andtheBrideof Falencia. By Frank Hall Standish. Esq.. 761 A wreath of Wild Flowers from New England. By Frances Sargeant Osgood.............761 Melaifi; and other Poems. By Elisa Cook..................761 Travels in Town. By the Author of " Random Recollections of the Lords and Commons.".... 762 Music and Musicians...........763 Fine Arts......................763 Literary and Scientific Institutions '........................763 l;niverstty Intelligence i.........764 The Navy.....................764 The Army....................764 Gazettes......................^ 764 Births, Marriages, and Deaths .. 764 Banking and Monetary Atlas.... 765 General Meethig of Deputies-Interview with the Government........................ 765. The Markets...................765 Advertisements.............." 765 THE POLITICIAN. FRENCH BLOCKADE OF mexico AND BUENOg ayres. Blackwood's ItilAGAziNE.-To Great Britain ttie iniquitous a^dunproypked'blpcka^e^^ and .Buenos Ayre�s are of transcendent impQrtance.' The^h'ple expprt trade of France to Mexico exceeds by little the amount of 700,000 francs, that of Great Britaitt re^hes to as manyainillions sterling. The 600,000 dollars only, so arbitrarily required in the shape of indemnity by France, is not far from equal to the value of one-half of her yearly traitic. The exaction is so miich the more preposterous, as it is notorious that Freneli traders or.adventurers seeking fprtune or subsistence in :foreiCT lands are the least burdened with capital ot commodities. Wp have seen and knpwn thiem by hundreds arriving out with thpir ,-]pettyj)ac(kiltes ot dentallas, bijouterie, &c.,' of liie worth of a reiw, jiounds biily; and would be bound to stake our re^utatipn on the fact that an average pf 1W. cash or waries to �ich'pf;the^fi^^ on anival; in M^iwp^ fer beyond * them^jof toi^^Qoiiity::!^^ system with sncayagrants,;:. cannot ibedoub^ in ene face of proofe adduced^ and proOfsi^hdlesis^\v[hich could be exhibited; it is a System t6o,nwhich(wiU^^^c^ tp flourish in rankloxuriance so long as it aired; and their lives themselves shortened. Besides, the ong residence of the members-the richest and most influential members in society-proves eminently prejudicial, not only to Scotland but to Ireland, and the parts of England itself remote from the metropolis. Hence all the evils of absenteeism. We have not, at this moment, out of eighty-nine Scotch nobility, one resident in Edinburgh, and very few of our considerable landed proprietors. Their visits, even to their estates, are short and far between, whereby the tenantry and peasantry on their estates are deprived of their aid and countenance in useful schemes; and excluded from the consumption in their oVn district, and among themselves, of those fruits which their own industry and labour have created. Of much, if not all of these evUs, an Imperial Parliament, sitting for three-fourths of the year in London, is the cause. And not only ought we to have a legislature for our own local concerns sitting in Edinburgh, but similar legislatures should be established in York^ Manchester, Bristol, and in London itself. Ireland would require at least two- one in Dublin, another at Belfast, Londonderry, or Cork. One of the mischiefs attending the present lengthened sittings in Parliament, which ought not to be overlooked, is, that it limits the choice of members, and confines it almost exclusively to the landed interest. No person engaged in any extensive business, except in London, can afford to represent a constituency. Nor is it certain that even the payment of members would extend the choice to eligible men, not in independent circumstances. Many fit persons would not chooseto give up their business and go into Parliament, although insured of 300/. or 500/., for one year. Were, however, our sessions as short as those of the old Scotch Parliaments, or of the United States, the encroachment upon pji^i^'r pursuits would be so inconsiderable as not to prevent tthe most able men, and the best men of business in the country accepting the office of representative. What is mjeant by a repeal of the union with Ireland, we dp n6t exactly understand; but if * One thousand pounds a mile, even in long lines, is not an exaggerated e$timat9 for the mere parliamentary expense; of obtaining the bill I all that is intended is, that the Irish should have the management of their own exclusive concerns, we heartily wish them success; and we hope that, when the people of Scotland shall see the necessity of a legislature in Edinburgh, the Irish will assist them in obtaining it. qualifications of a lord of the bedchamber. Times.-We dad all but forgotten that " vicious creature" the present Marquis of Headfort, and might have done so, but for-1st, a paragraph in the Downing-street morning oracle ; 2d, but for a letter, dated "Reform Club," in its evening echo. The morning blockhead taunts us with not daring to pursue our notice upon the Lord of the Bedchamber to a female Sovereign;-the latter has the stupid effrontery to shift his offence upon the memory of his deceased parent. The same reply will do, we suspect, foD both. In the year 1816 an action was brciught against a certain Lord Bective, for criminal conversation with the wife of a nobleman. Lord Bective let judgment go by default, that is, he durst not make any defence to that humiliating action. A jury was empanelled to assess the damages, and gave a verdict against Lord Bective for 10,000/. damages ! It was sworn in evidence that the plaintiff had been Lord Bective's friend, and that his unfortunate wife had before her seduction been visited with fits of insanity. 'Ihe Reform Club states that the defendant in that case was a former Marquis of Headforti We tell the letterwriter flatly, that he states a falsehood. It was the present Marquis of Head-fort, Lord of the Bedchamber to the maiden hp anticipated certain results with the utmost (iptifidi|l|[Oe. He ensured success by dispositions which could featlSiy fail to obtain it. We are far from admiring all^^ the par^ of the politicaV life of tlie Duke of WeUingt�n,'ana ftijr ;

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