Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Atlas Newspaper Archive: July 28, 1838 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Atlas

Location: London, Middlesex

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Atlas (Newspaper) - July 28, 1838, London, Middlesex                                TRANSMISSION  OF  "THE  ATLAS"  BY |�OST TO  FOREIGN  COUNTRIES, We are induced, by numrout applicaiima on thi, subject, to state, for the information of our SubtertHtirs. that "The Ma," mar, he transmitted free of postage, through the General Post Offices. to the following J^ces : Antigua       .Bkbbiob      Bobmos Atbes     CspHAtoNiA.     Dbhbbara    . Gibraltar Haiui;>|j^I      Jamaica BAaoTA Bbbmuoa     C�iaj>a Colombia       Denmark       Grbnada (New)    Ht^oiMvo     Laouira Bahamas       Brazils      Gabaooas Cobfu Dominica       Grbbob Uovpvii^       Malta barbadob3     Bbembn      Cabthaqena       Cdxhaven       Franob        . Halifax loMtAH ij^lbs    Montserbat " The Atlas" can also be transmitted, upon payment of onepenny. to India-Cape of Good Hope-South Wales.   Toall other places it may be forwarded upon thepayment of two pence. Nevis Newfoundland New Brunswick Nova Scotia Quebec Spain (via Cadia) St. Dominqo St. Kitt's St. Lucia St. ViNCBNT'g TOBAOO TOBTOLA Trinidad Zantk THE ATLAS OF THIS DAY CONTAINS:- paob The PoUtlctan...............465 EMt/Indiaa aiidGoIqnial;Atlas;. -ASi li'otdgDNews.............i..467; Imperial Parliament..'........^wwr British News . - MetropoUtanlnUUigence........�� Ireland.........................489 Scotland....................469 Jam Reports......r.............469 Asiii^e Intelligent..............469 Police OflSces..................469 Acddetots^Oflbnces..........470 Omnium.'..................... 470 Miscellanea.:.................. 471 Theatrical Intelligence..........471 Saturdaiy's News................ 471 Weekly Betrdspect of the Money Market...................... 471 I^ng Ariacles..............472 LondonBapaci^................472 Meraon^daenMtinand Things . 473 Theatricals........;........... 473 The Life of ier,M.D., 474 pagb Letters flrom Palmyra...........474 t9te Beauty of Holinef s, and other - Foems....................... 475 Sartor Beiartus ; the Lifo and . Opinionsof HerrTeufelsdrockh 475 An Ode on the Coronation of ^ Queen Victoria..............476 TheGuUeio Trade.............476 Standard Library Edition........ 476 The "Vnsdom and Genius of Shak* speare...........476 C. Crispl Sallustii Bellum Catili- nariumeiJugurthinum........ 476 BibleaNarrative....... 476 The Stage................... 476. Coronation Records...........476 LiteraryandSdentiflc Institutions 476 The Universities 476 The Army......................476 Gazettes..............:....... 476 Blrttis, Marriages, and Deaths .. 476 Banklng.and Monetary Atlas.... 477 The Markets...................478 Advertlsemehts.................479 Tttit F d L IT I CI AN; ,   CUSTODY OF INFANTS'BILL. British and Fobbion Review-The title of the bUl is a gross ^ii^iiaointir of deception. This we think the puUic, whb^ar*^ interested in such a bill, have a right to c(N9a;6l|i|l 0^^ If anything in the world ought to expresSf as cimly^^ its purpose . and object it jis^ |itile~of: of PMiiament; ^Sdr how else can the people know, as they havfe a ri^ht to know^) what is tht nature of the laws "mopdsed^by mciir ttepreso^^ mdess^whenM^ bound, and must ob^^i^vy ttw^ ones, at their own pe#?||>^.-�^^^""�H^ J^^^>ihetitfeSexpressed'its real.olqe�S.andllhich^te eflfect, it yould have run thus:� A bill to provide for th4 access of wives. liVintr n^n��W *~ be done, at least well enoiifth such, in truth, has been the ijaents in human; affairs. Th witJibut slavery, or a great'i l-gi^jm&ent, w�i;e not secii:reyiz.ed. , TheviiiuTtifta^^ own capiacify to decidevi^on * sdriing;turna deaf ear toall.--^,-._r--,--T--r------      , ticabflity. of aiiy; great i tb?iij^ hitherto .undone. And among such things '||ie^ r6dTCtii|^of tlip laws of any .country into a'; s|k of from the direct authority of be considered. Of the i|dw^ iheilatCT  �0<= 8^ .------------- Wasitbe^sRUse the Other title was less/likely..foa,Wiract' terpisit make#use of, butvlfa' I)ubhc intention^and investigation, and foreseenopposiw;^fent tp be.detannined bythl; jr would be affected, indirectly, by^this bai,.pi5^oa-. It does, to change one of the fundamental laW� o^ - 'nn'#lv r.t.tlfiiiirini.-m^Aii^^^ ^^L-Ai^^^^..'^..-- 'i'     >.'..t <' society, and aai of titemiwhbse wives, hiisbands/parentsJ statute law wh^h s;ii6iiIj(^J roi*H^�, apwkdirectly,-stiU, as thepoore^iarhich. should c^l^in"W? would, and.(fiuck is.tbe.blessed consistency;of our pre^n^ �' marriage^laW)/only the/wi^aithy; can afibrd! tbJ^pUrcl^^ the luxurious right of divorce, or mutual separatioii, it| wflj.be the aristpcracy,;.princiRWV.^ fiist affect, .t And*to this,w^ ^eqijestj %he,mqre, t^^^ .because, as ;tliey, by thdrtwealth,,-iwnk�^^ p^ . a^d cpn-spicuous station, have ^ an incakulably greater infltitenc^ over the morals of a society, wl^etlier fear ?|^od or fot. .evil,| than any other class itfit|;;a^ftUTr^^ Mifectis then- morahtyw affectjso^^ thie :more rapidly that of the whole country. iHpw^lhen^wiU this bill aflfect them and the country P Willliits effect be a good one ? Will its "operation be wholesome and safi? ?i JNo. We the g^ssest inconsistence and^a^^ to prin- ciple and practice, from beginning to end. ��  * * * * * We have tdnaetdy alluded in strong^ te.rms/to the dece^Jtive; entitling'liifv the fbill, and'we think it right to add a few more W0WS' on that subject. We , are in the habit of readittg'tM newspapers, and })kying as much attention certainly, men to the daQy,proceeding's of Parliament ;,-l]iut?j&)R.iBC^^ of the deceptive, insignificant title of this 'biUj;it}was by the merest chance that we were ever led to examine into its nature.at all; and, from th? s?une cause, we presume, it has been, that, during the passage of the bill through the House of Con^monsi ^ot one of the papers, 'as fer;as we know, devoted any space in its columns.to the discussion of the real bearings of the question j and mftn^y of them did "not ev;epeyiotice it at all. But what is still more extraofdipaisi^j'il^pu by Mr. Serieant Talfourd's speech; repprted^m the Time^ of iSth December last, thatims.BiU, or ".on�i the same^i^^^ substance;'*land bearing the: siame title, '^Was read a se-cond time test sessionl" ^ Wi6w of this we were totally uri^ awai^, as we beHev^ persons put of every tljioiisjaiid, out of the-Hpri^e, rn^^e pountry were also. And no wondier! How should th^y be aware of it ? It |)as8ed th^rou^h aU its- stages    that session without the slightest deV^pihent oil the part of the framer! . Why was this?,        not this;a proceeding most strange and unpatallel^u|�h the introduction of a bill to overthrow the ftiUdameht^ lay of society ? Well might the" fr^ner of it shrink, if lie wished to get his de-s|;ructive biU passed, from'attradtpg the" attention of the public,,by giving to it its re^^tjItM or :by exciting them, through^any discussion out of'tl^'Housennti^ the prin ciple nadbeeh admitted ih^ 1�|^erciBption of its rea natinre. '� r   early  edition Lin time for post- principles of c0dificati6n-Tja� new penal code for ., . . .iND was contested) has long since been as w^ll proVCji g^itepifdscan prove it, and can billy be made more evidpht, r|*J'�K^5lly trying to do that which, until dotie, the wdsad #81 .never believe can i)e wdrth. doing. And of most great improve-il^ation shpuld exist witbput. monarchical 'levM possible, until _ distrustful of their fdence of general rea-iStritions of the prac- |ments proceeding tture, must as yet ^,___ insisted upon by the one perhaps in Si^ctessful is in showing ht>.l^p^.j^roye. tioui suchas the bill was likely to meet with, in ltmiHe,i J�?tice, a real knowledge had Its r^al object been generally known?  *  We'wjfeh asm England^by a study pf, It alsp to be bprne in mind by the reader^ that altliough has even-been found. wortltJw^,.^-^_____-.s�^�.��u� the well-l?emflfjof every mati, woman, and cMd in the  f the oldlawlw^k^ country wpuldbeaffected,indirectly, bv^this bai..nM�M.      Jjrinciples^^ on:whiph :tlife^ffig^^^ in their^- [di'meahing and Ip^S of the courts of cjto pnly be obtaihed, !i�^ and cases; audit "~irint large editions l,000f. a year for examining revenue acts, ought to be compelled to retrench and reform all bills brought before Parhament; but surely a lawyer, who has all his life been pursuing a contrary course, and who has probably contracted a habit of even thinking in, surplusage, is not the fittest person to correct and remove the nuisance. We think that what passed on Tuesday night ori this point will not be without its utility. Generally half of every statute might be lopped away, and the law would thereby be rendered more clear, simple, and certain. "Iljo frame a body of lljii^h adventitipus aid; p. tijie^law > that, is ne-toi^nable him to exe-:hoWs the facts of 'ctjnstarttct a code. %l$iea the object aimed jepf(^t8;at codification. It 18 because the pre- the particular cai^ But this, so far asvc^l^Kii^i^ at m any of thempdenivEu?)S)i| anterior to the one now h^^,...^ ------^..s,- sent'is'anatteiUpttoattauBt'4ha^^ (so far as we can yet venture tip judge)'eittiei^i^ one, that we,ai:B.�mxiouS to iU'wte'ttt^^^^^Pl^ and the criti-cismof; jurists, and of .p^r^tMi�s|i^riltjic^^^^ conversant with the intjerpretationof langij|;toe.' f^J^ this pro- posed penal < code has scutra^thp^^Pblem; that it has actually done, so far aA the picnalb^tf^ Pf'law isjconcerned, that wMch was. denied to'be namely, to frame adequate, definitions of .pff^p^s|i ,e^^ in general language: definitions sufficientli|r^|<^^ to-leave no doubt that complete accuracy is^^^tiainable. Doubtless, as there are itnpPrfi^tiobs.Mali^^liN^ especially in all. such works, eixamii^a^ion w^t:^ or experience disclose, cases neci^OT for, wmchtheframers of thesisrdefimtions have overlooked; but the emendations-necessary tb^include such cases, can be made without disarranging' t^e plan or disturbing the symmetry of the code; and that is enough.. tautology and verbiage of acts of parliament. Morning Chronicle-Tlie.^prse than nonsensical v w)u>jpbserved that itseemed not enough to.enact that 'frpni;time to time" certain steps should be taken, but "at |tt times hereafter,'' and "whensoever it should be tiiou^^ by him or them (the commissioner or commiS8iphew)>iBt; and expedient.'' He also poihted out another clain^ix^;which more than half the words.might be advantag^puwy rejected. The truth is,' that this kultiplication an4.^(jic^lica Pf terms and phrases has risen to a ituonsli^us'evil, the origin of it b^g that the lawyerisij "^q^dra#|bills,^^^^ usually paid accdrding to the number of woircfe they can crowd into them, a feult notoriously eitWidilig to every species of legal instrument. Then, ^iu� the use of this verbiage preates ainbiguity, ambijlftt^ty cx^   litigation, and liti- Sationfees; so that the lawyers jpilay their own game at ie expense of the public.:   allowing for the costs of construction, this, to use the language of ourcontempo- , rarytheiSftonoTarcf, is neither morenor less than confiscation. There is, no mistaking the intentions entertained by Mr. Spring Ric^: with respect to railroads.  That he al^nr doned the most iniquitous part of his project when he. foUndihat Parliament would not sanction theinju.stice, is no doubt'true; but the opinions delivered by him on Satu;r^.ay, afford sufficient indications of a disposition to take 9n un&ir adv^tage of the railroad companies. Why, fpr instaiice, if PiMrliaiuent subjected them to /the extortionate demands of owners of property, should they not be entitled to'indemnification for their outlays on that Hccoiint?   We; would advise the different railroad com-.panies to watch the movements of this adversary, who w^l.lpse noppportunity of pcbfiting hy their mist^es or their supinepess, ? if he can. A statesminn of jcnlarged views would see that it was'of far more importance to encourage individuals to execute beneficial' undertakings like railroads, thaji to shake the confid(;nce in which such undertakings have their origin, by, a miserable attempt to, gain; a few thousand pounds a year, to. the Treasury. Every man of any discernment must.perceive, that by means of railroads land and other property will become valuable, in proportion to their proximity to railroads, and that it is hardly possible to over-estimate the addition which the .national wealth will derive from this source. The instance cited by Mr. Baines of the addition to the wealth of Manchester and Liverpool caused by the railroad justifies the. most sanguine anticipations of benefit from these undertakings.  Yet to the jaundiced eye of the Chancellor of the Exchequer the different railroad companies appear in the light pf enemies of their country whom he is bound to discburaige as much as he possibly can. publicity of parliamentary proceedings. Standard-The position in which we find ourselves with reference to this important subject (the Church Discipline Bill) reminds us of, what we cannot help regarding as, in every view, an impoUtic omission on the part of the House of Lords-we mean the non-pubUcation of its papers. The House of Commons gives freely to the public the opportunity of purchasing, at a very cheap rate, all the documents printed for the use of its members -bills, reports, minutes of evidence, &c. The consequence is, that, save when the House proceeds with great precipitation, it has the advantage of the whole mind of the country exercised upon the measures in progress; much valuable .information is thus invited and tendered as to details*, and the pulse of the people is, if we may so speak, felt as to principles. Nor is it the smallest advantage resulting from this publicity, that the ijeople take an interest not only in the proceedings, but in the House conducting them. The House of Lords has nothing to conceal, and it is impossible to guess.why it should be more jealous of its documents than the other House of Parliament To the press generally the restriction is a ^reat inconvenience. Men, at least men whose support is worth anything, will neither ask, nor an obligation, or which is only less degrading, by deding with a lord's butler, that one can ever get hold of any biU PT report of the House of Lords, This js our apology fqr,? t .a   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication