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   Atlas (Newspaper) - July 21, 1838, London, Middlesex                                M mmval 0tMiipK�tx antf grournal at atterature. TRANSMISSION   OF  "THE  ATLAS"  BY  POST  TO   FOREIGN  COUNTRIES. fFe are induced, by numerous applications on this sulject, to state, for the information of out* Subscribers, that " The Mas " may be transmitted free of postage, through the General Fast Offices, to the following places: ANTIQUA BBEBIOH BrSNOsAYEHS        CHPHAL0NI4        DEMERAEA GiBKAtTAE HaMBUEGH JAMAICA NbVIS QUEBEC St. LucIA TjUNIDAD Baqota Beemdda     Canada Columbia        Denmabk        Geenada (New)    Keliooland      Laquika Newfoundland      Spain (via Cadiz)    St. Vincent's     Zante Bahamas        Beazils       Cakacoas Cohfu Dominica       Gheece Hondueas        Malta New Brunswick    St, Domingo Toba�o Baebadoes     Beemen       Cabthagena        Cuxhaven       Feance Halifax Ionian Isles    Montsereat    Nova Scotia St. Kitx'b Toetola " The Atlas" can also be transmitted, upon payment of one penny, to India-Cape of Good Hope-New South Wales.   To all other places it may be forwarded upon the payment of two pence. No. 636. Vol. XIII.] THE ATLAS OF THIS DAY CONTAINS :- page SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1838. The Politician................449 East Indian and Colonial Atlas.. 450 Foreign News................450 Imperial Parliament............451 BritisliNews.................. 453 Ireland........................453 Law Reports................... 453 Assize Intelligence............... 453 Police OfSces..................454 Accidents and Offences..........454 Omnium......................� 454 Theatrical Intelligence........455 Saturday's News................455 Weekly Retrospect of the Money Market......................455 Leading Articles ..............456 The Morality of the Stage.......456 Theatricals....................456 litebaturb. The American to Paris.......... 457 page Landscape Lyrics............;. 458 The Clockmaker; or the Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick .. 458 The Woman of the World......459 The Bose-Fancier's Manual...... 459 litebary memoranda. A Flora of Shtopshire...........459 The Imagery of Foreign Travel.. 459 Young Lady's Equestrian Manual 459 Intermarriage.................. 459 Scriptural Studies.:............. 459 Fine Arts...................... 459 Literary and Scientific Institutions 460 The Universities ..............460 The Army.....................460 Gazettes"..................... 460 Births,.Marriages, and Deaths .. 460 Banking and Monetary Atlas.... 460 The Markets...................461 Advertisements................. 462 THE  POLITICIAN. the first lord of the \admiralty. Times-Rumours have been afloat for some days past, that at length the harassed and scurvily treated navy of Great Britain was released from the sordid gripe which so long has tormented it, the prime minister being roused to a full, though tardy, sense of the disgrace to his own government retaining in a post so conspicuous, and in every national point or view so important, as that of First Lord of the Admiralty, a personage incapable, when judged by his own words, of comprehending the clearest principles on which the service ought to be coii-ducted with reference to foreign states; ano^ if judged by his actions, no less incompetent to, regard the authority yested in him over that noble service, as anything better than a commodious instrument for meanly advancing his own selfish ends, tmd' loading his perabnal connexions with that rank aiid those emolumeiits due only to fessional eitperiende w It has, we say* been ru.: moured for some days, though we do not believe the fact, that' the Scotch First liord of the Admiralty, whose respect for the fireedbm of the seas and for the law of nations stands much on a par with his attachment to the freedom of election, is, under some strange impulse of honest shame on the part of Lord Melbourne, sent about his business, being looked upon as a portion of the mi-^ nisterial concern, from whicn neither credit, nor profit, nor any other benefit, can henceforth be dtawn-r-an article of cargo whose weight gives no stability, nor its bulk any buoyancy to the vessel, and for which the order ought long since to have passed to ^< cut the lashings, and ^end it overboard." Now,'we but repeat the rumours in cirr culation. We do not believe a word of them,  it % not credible,, after all we have seen, that Lord Melhoorne should at this time of day be troubled with inward visitings of any fastidious nature.  The elements of that ministry which. With open eyes, he himself constructed, the power which alone sustaihied it, and th^ form and course of action to which it was thus froih its very origin predestined, forbade all access of surprise, mortification, or resentment^ to the mind of him b^ whom itwas^ut together, at the most flagrant exhibitions of incapacity or worthlessness in any of its coinj^onent parts. That moral sense, to the imperfection of which in its author we owe the creation of such a cabinet, must have been further degenerating every, day.  The Lord Melbourne who was capable of selecting Lord Minto, and who did not feel himself or the government degraded by the disgusting incidents of the Roxburgh election, is not a man to be now provoked by a mere disjjlay of acrimonious, mischievous, and dull perverseneiss in this same q^uarter, on a question of international law, into the expulsion from his ministry of a culprit whom Ke has long known to be hardened and incorrigible, who may indeed have first found favour in his patron's sight from a persuasion that he would stick at nothing.  Once more, therefore, it is to us incredibly that a person qualified like Lord Minto to perform work for which niany other noblemen are not qualified, should be dismissed from office by a prime minister who is accustomed so to appreciate such qualifications; and as there is only one other cause to which the exit of the First Lord of the Admiralty could be ascribed-^that is to say, his own voluntary dudgeon at the flat disclaimer exjpressed by Lord Melbourne of him and his new construction put upon the quadruple treaty-we need scarcely sajr that it is too ridiculous to ima^ne for a momentthe possibility of any such consummation.   We agree in this case with Lord Brougham, who, on being told that Lord Minto had. taken huff and " resigned," is reported to have answered, " No, no, all nonsense, you may assure yourself; that gentleman has a d-- deal more * patience* about him than resignation."   Indeed, . IMPROVED CHARACTER OF THE PEOPLE. MoRNiNo Chronicle-^We this day publish a short but very important pubHc document-ra return moved for by Mr. Hawes of "A Copy of the Report of the Superiiw tendent of Police in Hyde-park to the Commissioners of Police, on the day of her Majesty's Coronation." It is remarkable, as showing in a most unquestionable manner the ^ood conduct of the people of this metropolis. In a multitude larger than ever was gathered together in London, there was no rioting, no offensive scenes of drunkenness,, and during the day only twenty persons were taken into custody and conveyed to the station. They consisted of:- Pickpockets..................7 Felon (only apprehended la the fair, for the act was committed some time before)................1 Persons charged with gambling ............12 20 It is, perhaps, not over  .. difference between ili;  ijnalilioa . u > vatives proposed in       lieu      ' which they have can K i.w it were otherwise, w t   . \        o i. or the practical ettu:i<.,.    "i        i - exact uniform ty in itieir iitii.du.y . the contrary, tnat.boih cus.uin ann sition duties demands an adai, a.ii,, operations to the circumsianct   whit. around them.  They hold no cabinet cuuucua-a^t) are not responsible to the Sovereign and the cpuntry for an intelligible line of action by. which the governed may estimate beforehaud what they have to expect from their governors. They are not the managers of a great cam-pai^ working from a certain basement line of operations to pre-determmed points of achievement.  Their warfare and the mode of conducting it must rather be suggested to them by the proceedings which they have to liold in check than by pre-conceived plans for the government of the cpuntry, which plans ought not to be their concern. If, therefore, an opposition does change its propositions according to the place in which, or the circumstance's under which, these propositions are madie, it cannot as a body be charged with inconsistency of purpose, although any Individual who at one time proposes one sort of measure and at another time another, is no doubt bound to show how he has happened to have altered his mind, or how, being still in the same mind, he consents to an altered line of proceedhig.  Withtegard to a government, however, since it is responsible, as a bbdy, and since it is understood to determine, as a body, what shall be the specific terms of the measures by which it proposes to govern, there is certainly more reason for demanding either strict unifoiinity or a strict account of the reasons for departing from it.   It is scarcely to be supposed, considering the delay which took place between bir R. Peel's proposition in the House of Commons and the adoption of a different course by the goveriiment, that the cabinet did not deliberate upon the matter, and settie that the government leader in the Lower House should propose a 5/. qualification. We can scarcely believe that this franchise was merely Lord J. RusseU's idea of what was easiest for him under the peculiar circumstances of the case, and that he sent the bill up to the Lords without the sense of the whole government having been taken upon it.  Now, if the whole government detenoined two or three weeks ago upon a 5/. franchise, how happens it that, in the House of Lords, the gay and gracious premier seems never to have thought of a franchise lower than 8/., and the ponderous Lord Lansdowne gave up the 5/; firom the very beginning as " unquestionably too low ?" If Lord John Russell's proposition w^ without the consent of government, what safety, or dighit;^, OT uniformity, can we look for from an administratibh which allows the^e important matters to be proposed in,the House of, Commons without previous consideration P  If it was with the consent of government, why is it that government-without even so much as a word of explanation on the subject -has one rule for the House of Commons and another for the House of Lords ? We t^iink that this-especially   -   

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