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   Atlas (Newspaper) - February 24, 1838, London, Middlesex                                ON THE LARGEST SHEET PRINTED. No. 615. VbL. XIII.] SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1838. THE ATLAS OF THIS DAY CONTAINS i- r  karly edition Lin time for post. Politician   ........ 113 But India and Colonial Atlaf   . 114 -Iniperial Parliament . . ... 115 BriditaNewi  . . . . .  . N 117 Ireland  . . . ^ .  . .... llf L .-.:. .� ' 118 Baaing and Monetary Atlas , . 119 Weekly itetrdip�!t Jof the Money  ' . . i 121 ^Arsenicated^C^dles 4 i .     ./121' Tiieatlricala    . ,     v . . ; 122 Sanuiscus'andlfalmyii . . . . I22J BiwM^iUtaltt^ ; . . . . 1^ PAOK ADsrepresebtation, or Scenes in 'RfealLifo .  . . . .  .  ,  .123 Confessions of an Elderly Lady 123 The' Miseries and Beauties of Ireland   J......,.124 Literary Memoranda- BoWbotham*B  Derivative Dic-. tlonary-Carr's Latin Homonyms  .........124 The Hand-Boolvof Cooltery] . . 124 Musicimd MusiRans. . . .  .124 Pine Arte   .. . :.....125 Literary and Scientific Institu- tlons   ........ . 125 Unitersities.......125 Anttjr ; .  . . . . ; .  .  . 125 Gatettes.........125 Births, Marriages, and Deaths   . 125 The Markets.......126 AdveTtiseDdents......127 T H ^ P 01.1T101A JN. BBItlSBlM^GISTIUTES^IN THE WEST I^ ! TiMRS--A colonial newspaper, called the St. Vincent .Gaxeitif iias been sent to us, wherein is inserted a jiublic "docuii^ent, j^ainM to read, and, as it appears to us, iti no 'sihaill ddgreb 'discreditable to the Avriter. That,writer is no O^her than Lord Glenelg, a parsonage already, conspicuous enouith for his talents as an official correspond-jent. The,noble iordin aw moment, ait&iousto lay up forihi^self % this exertion a title to some longer .speU of reversionary slumber, indites a "circular" from Dc^t<^1^]Ef-^yei^^i^^^ to the special magistxates in tlie West^^^Il^ who "have been ajippiiitj^ since the abo-litibii bf islay^ry thro^ isla^nds to an arduous, .and pj^entimes perplexing, duty. His lordship in this circular takes occasion to apprise the unhajjpy gentlAnen who had'&ccepted the office of special magistrates in the colonies/ that on the expiration of me, term for which non-recQsd apprentices a^^ to labour, a large iminution in the, number of special magistrates will take �placei and that neither the: gentlemcin then reduced, nor any of those whose reduction niust be jibstponed uiitil the 'fibd expuatioh of all apbiieritieesbip in the year 1840, are to chjerish. the h pe'*, of having iany, even the scantiest, 'prqvisiba -ri^de' for them by her Majesty^s goVem-juent. N pleases ? We throw out these questions because they embody the floating impressions on the subject,} and becaase, whatever degree of immediate importance may attach to them, there can be no,doiibt that such is the probable course of affairs at present. Sir Robert Peel is the representative of Cotton Toryism, as it. has been, not unaptly,^termed. The opinions and feelings which he embodies are those of the inerchants and manufacturers who made money under the old regime, and who are, therefore, attached to it partly from perception of its advantages, and partly from a viague fear of the results of any change. But persons who are ruljed by these fears are equally averse to push resistance^ tO' extremity, as to yield with too great facility. They ofier a given quantity of difficulty, but it is well known that, let the impelUng force rise to a certain amount^ and the difficulty will dis- appear. It was this that produced Catholic emancipation. It was tnis that carried the Reform Bill. To have persevered in resistance upon either of those occasions, would have put in hazard all the wealth of the country that did not consist in land; aud this was a risk which, in the opinion of the ruling Tories of that day, was not counterbalanced by the dangers to be apprehended from concession. But since these two signal examples of the insufficiency of this principle to meet great emergenciesj the cbnfidence^f large numbers of the Tories in their former heads has been utterly destroyed. They talk of the restraint imnosed upon them by those whom the Standard termed " the timid classes encumbered with wealth,"- and they wish to free themselves from it. They find that they shall be again sacrificed as they have been before, and are resolved to take measures to prevent this before it is too late. At the same time it should be remembered that th� party principle of which Sir R. Peel is the representative has been gradually dying out. The days of monopolies and jobs are long past The Bank, the East India Company, the contractorships, &c. &c., whence Pitt drew the sources of his chief power, no longer offer the advantages they were formerly made to produce. The old municipalities, another large depository of the same feeling,' have been destroyed. The struggle is reduced chiefly to questions connected with the teriritorial aristocracy of the cpuhtry^'aiid the abuses of the establishment.' Here Sir R. Peel, who has no ancestry of which to boast, whose acres, though paternal, can hardly be dignified with the title pf hereditary--who has abeady deserted the church lifpph.one vital occasion-is not the natural leader. A ineiriber of the aristocracy, and an uncompromisingfriend 0^the;church, is needed for what is now the most important section of fhe Tories. And therefbre ii i^,' tBat, whether ornot any change is cbhtemplated at the'^r,es[ent moment, we feel asstir^d that a division must soon r arise. The .money section of the Tories dp-riot desirer to adjppt anything so decided as avot^ of?ceijsure^tbte fettdal portion are restrained by no apprehensions. Whellier or not either par^y will yield on thisocqasiofl, ,we ^^a^n^ of cburise^, predict. . If neither, the di's^sijpn mil Be '^a'd^^^^ miediately apparent. If, however, "hariiibny is iprejierved by concession for the present, the period of separaition, can hardly be fkr distant. ' '   '   " allegation OF peejury against HO^. MBMri^ SifANDAab-The follpmbg woifds arei^ by thejrjepOrter Of the 4/ori�i�^ C/^rpmcZe, ascribed to Mr. .O'Cprittelli as delivered-yesterday at the Crown and Anchor, dinner :- Ireland was not safe from the JBrigUali and- Scotch'^fetitry. It WM,hojreiMe,tQ.thiiik that a body of gentlemen-:-men who^ ranked high fin society, who were theSaselyes the adn;uni�itrat,OTS of the law,;a;id.j^*?'ho ottght the^^ above all suspicipiii and Ayho o^llj^i to set an' example to p�hers---was it not horrible that they ^oiild he perjuring themselves in thie committees of the ;H ouse of Comimo& ?" (Gro^ , /The time was pome when; tins should be proclaimed hoidiy. He was ready to be a martyr to justice and trutivhut^npit .to fds&'swearing; and, therefore, he repeated that there, was foul pequry in the Tory committees of the House of Commons., ;(Lpud;oheers.) If the person who iis said to have used this language were not as mspudent as he is reg^ of all the obligations pf honpur,rmoraAity, and religibn, he would be the last man living tp name the crime which he-^he so falsely- ascribes to " the gentry of Engla,nd and Scotland." He, the great violator ,of his parliamentary, oath !T-4ie the leader of a bjuid pfmen wh^ it like himself- the first who iritfo^uced the fearful portent of such a crime into the British legislature!!. The English and Scotch gentiy, this perSph saysj'are perjurers^ Weask the filthy slanderer: of Eri^iisli'm^ wpirieri--(yes; tra- ducei^ we have riyetted the calumny upon you, desjpite of all ypi^shuffiirig arid all your iriuUiplied denials)f----we ask the filthy slandCerer^ how, happens it, if the English and Scotch gentiry are perjured and unjust, that a '\mlsper of suspicwa was never breathed against the integrity 01 election coijuriittees, while they coritinu^d tpbe cpmppsed exclusively pf" the EngKsh a^^ Scotch gentry,", and of the Protestant gentry of Ireland-^how happens it that during a period of sikty yearsi- the awards of these committees were uniihpeacned and uhiihpeachable, rin in the sixty-first vear pollution was brought irito the tribunal by him and his fellows of theabSolvingcreedP Thajt the horrible crime is comiriittedi^ true, even, though Mr. O'Connell has proclaimed it; but by whom is it committed? Let the results say. Six committees have reported, but of |\these five oidy have had. any case to tiy, the sitting member in the sixth place (Marylebone) having offered no defence. The five committees that have reported, after trying, or pretending tb try, petitions, were all committees having a majority of Whig-Radical members, and they have afl reported in favour of the Whig-Radical party. We have already spoken of the SalCoyd ca^e,, in which an error, or an irregularity of t;he.,;Wbig-Iladieal returning officer, was allowed to defeat the claint of the Conservative petitioner, even at the thy^^ishotdr-iof the Longford case, in which the conunittee,by'b|b|i^y^^^&^ eluding inmass all the evidence Which they^]^ej!�^ to receive, denied ^ven an approach '|o,|u8t;ice.^^^t^ aggrieved electors-of the Roxburgh casif, in which the most atrocious and extensive violence was tulei hot to constitute, intimidation-of the Peterfiififld. arid Bristol cases we hiave not spoken, because we believe the decision in the former to have been just, and in the latter it was not so flagrantly opposed to justice and to truth as t� justify an unequivocal'arraingment Of it.  Where, then,   

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