Anti Gallican Monitor, December 31, 1815

Anti Gallican Monitor

December 31, 1815

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Issue date: Sunday, December 31, 1815

Pages available: 8

Previous edition: Sunday, December 24, 1815

Next edition: Sunday, January 7, 1816 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Anti Gallican Monitor

Publication name: Anti Gallican Monitor

Location: London, Middlesex

Pages available: 2,262

Years available: 1811 - 1817

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Anti Gallican Monitor (Newspaper) - December 31, 1815, London, Middlesex tot-WO , iv.....iV* r; **** ' W |�ro�r few !V** ^^^^^ SlIAiCHWRARF.- IP 4AI 1,ljf that Gaverntnent be btitf&tlife^r-itfto!*1 �/>r 6u4 Its a^i^irl^fep- tfent Ku�4i*lv Journalists, merely IjK^se tJtWe (jilt. V* "^T^ -ry, n' . * # 7 ^.'TT1!.' i � h4V�"��M w :tf^',AJ|lf5?1?#.' *wc vhitfH. .1 shall' t�ke aahoYt retrospect of the .principal occuf-re�t**-*f M��present year,"no*.at th4 �Uvse.' if he titflev '^Anti-Oit/Udtm^'w-Hivh this Paper jv>;lrsr wits*.objtipt�}>ly� except in the event of the dura, nod of BVi)NiriSt'E'si Government and system, anjf persons'^-llti.ifeil3b;uetL" ithis manner may jjcriiays thuik that such a,title 1* not applicable tn die present state of affairs, or to that relation of peace and amity which so happily exists be-ween !T^tt�te-ajn4'.'B.'^a�d. They suppose that the very wortl Akii^pnlticaih keeps a spirit of national hostility alive, and that nothing but miiiclimf �-*�� result from such wicked perseve-raiicein the old system of opposition to French jiriucipb.'l. To this I'shall answer, that if facts correspond wiih professions--if France were sincerely disposed to maintain those friendly relation*, 1 would be the lavt man in the world to endeavour to keeji �p a hostile feeling on our part. But if France, under her present Government* maintains the same hostile spirit a^aiusttlns country as when under Buon Av\uri:, arev?e immediately to adopt a system of cordi-lity iowifds our inveterate litics; one supports the I)uonarartists, the ther the Bouhbon (ioverunient, as if the in-|-Tests of England depemled upon the name $\ the ruling dynasty in France. If we attend 0 one party, they endeavour to persuade, us that iir Government has been instrumental in des-iwing a free, peaceably disposed Government in rauee, (meaning liuosAPARTK's after \m re-urn from Elba,) and even in violating the law 1 nations, solemn compacts, &c. &c. in assist-the present Government of France in pei- ^'utia^and immolating its innocent subjects, f>e Nr.Ys, the Lasjedoykres, and the Lav alettes : the other party, now that the liouu-ojjs are restored, bid u� be satislicd ; that every ta^ure of that Government shews evident proof wisdom, and that th* virtues of the King and Princes of his House; aud their gratitude to-arl^r.s, who, ev�eu in that country, are not permitted to -give vent to their bile against England, and lavish their abuse against every thing which 'is iflus'tri-. ons in it--abuse too foul to be; admitted even into their own journals. Bat'ooeg&bd results from this very s� ha me fill abuse, gamely, that when it is.said that there is no liberty in this country^the impunity with which this country aud( tovernmcntare lib-iled contradietsuoh asser-tio.ns� Therefore as I have hitherto lieen vavit h em-* ployed in answering the lucubrations of liU��-HAisA \i FK liiinsidf, 1 iind it will beinyta>k in future to answer those of his remaining' ]�arti/.ans, as well as of the HouaiSON laeuln'atioa^j' which, under a different name, breath-.' a siirdar spirit,, A ad let me be clearly understood; when I speak of Bourbon lucubrations ; I mean thf. V-^'ulirii-lions in support of the Boi;anar�jed in the worst vvc.v� tin renityof mind so necessary in a public writer, is unavoidably di�turb.-J by feci tags of iialfgua-lion at corruption. 1 know it may be ?f IHI^ wil^ shifiiirwttV^utshu^"i\v\Atof false friend a mid-seerefc and open ejjewies, Vyh*u:h Would be.Hitu.le against >*, 4s soon ab the conspiracy in favour .of liuoM� a parte'had received whape audi consistency, I happily got intelligence that a graiul attempt was to be made once more by the Felon of Elba, mid a:i my regular Readers may recollect 'erf the first person plural lVt;-\n commenting-on the political occurrences of the v/eek,ortosuch articles as are usually written by the' Editor of a Newspaper. S have done so hitherto because it is tin: custom, but a custom to be followed should be good, mains nsns ab'tlcndnu c:rf> 1 shall follow it no longer; the'name which stands at the head of the Paper will henceforward serve as a general signature for every such article. We is magisterial, or dictatorial if you will-I object to it because it savours of arrogance-be-cause it is lighting under a borrowed shield. , It is, iu mv. humble opinion,_ proper that every public writer should divest himself of .suelj adventitious assistance, iu order that the Public should be able to estimate the value of the political sentiments, by knowing who be is, from whom they proceed, and also that they may lie aide to detect immediately any departure from hii> principles. The English Newspapers are divested of their'responsibility by the prevalence of the custom, and the Editor can, on any future day, when attacked as an apostate, deny the objectionable article to be written by him, and say that it was the work of some other'person. My brother journalists may think that Wc bestows a had long before that fiystem which I, aud 1 only ivcouKiiouded.. lie was put o.ut of the pale, of huy the Law of Nations, and the whole mil loreo