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   Anti Gallican Monitor (Newspaper) - November 12, 1815, London, Middlesex                                � * -TI.JB- ** Pence be to Franco, if" France in Vcacv. permit " T�c just awl lineal cniranre to our q�n .- " If not. l�U>r\ss,vvo, w ho had amused the Corps Diplomatique with j't'ts and line words till the very moment, that he intimated, to them the order to depart in a few hoars. This he termed refinement tn polities; one might find no difficulty in giving it another appellation. It was also useless for him to ut-tciul to the beucdictiousund panegyrics of which he wa*,the object, a*-, well as the company ol'st rolling players, oi 'which he was the manager, who, under the appellation of t iie servants oft he M mister of Foreign Relations, had passed the whole summer in performing plays at Wilna. This company was fonip "sc {ban letnen pan' me a visit on fheir passing through Warsaw, where they left, neither mvsc.lf, jior fh;' strangers who wereaboutmo, verv deeply pia.etr.Ued with a profound respect, for French diplomacy. One of our A mbas-adoi-,, uecrcdiied te a great Court, -who was addressing to me dispatches for v/t!na, did tiot fail io entreat me fo forward the ' bit of pager' for Wdna. At length the Duke of I-A-s.' v^nived on the ltiih of ik-oember ; I saw iron enter the Court of my Sheei at eight mthe kmcniug, m an open sledee; he was cove-red wgh mnc fro*-t, slaving travelled when the weather was from twenty to twentv-live degree-, below the freezing point, and, wonderful to relate, he had slept, the v. hole night- so strong was his constitution. (bairnd L ur~ iasTON accompanied him. His o'iY. 7 was (pme bewitching; 1 uarmed iiim as well as 1 was able. Alter breakfast he' .-.poke on bu-irc'-s, al-most, in the same way as he iiM-d to wri'e.- What btruek mo most win, to see him convinced dnt we could maintain our past at Wilna. A J:\v days before, this, he w role t o me. ! .ha ! the only "natter :u . 1 learned on mv arrival that ilie M,ui.'f;\>r ha) an-nouneed., the very nevt day alter the l\yt .Himn's arrival, that {was deprived of my office of (i i and \ that tiiis epoch of mv life was assuredly that in i Almoner. I which physically and morally speaking I suiVered |     J also foui.d, on arrivino-. a letter fivon the Mi-the most. 1 nister of l'olice.   This letter invited me to re- in the conversation which the presenting ol j servo my first, visit for him-another let tor li om this 3Ie.uorial was the means of introducing, 1 | the Minister of Public Worship, hailed me to complained of the  metamorphosis which I was S call at his house. obliged to undergo, from the character id' an | The attentions  f such great personages bore. | Ambassador to that of a Commissary. I to J rat her a suspicious appearance S had been S answered me very mtivdi/, that a similar  thing | also previously informed, that many p-T-a'in, of had happened to himself. I complained, besides, of having been, without any respect for my character, thrust into a mission which had a most decided Revolutionary complexion ; and I eon- whom f knew nothing', presented t hem -adves to bo informed of my anival. It was cleiMhat. the storm was already collected. I presented myself to the iN! i ne-l or of ! 'ol ice ; he me in :>'  (he eluded with assuring him, that I was firmly re- 1 talked to I solved never lo take any part iu future  m  mat- | displeasure.    I ! .,i to my manner of seeing and acting, and which reduced me to the condition of a passive instru-[; rncjit. The Shike read my Memorial, heard me jj vvirl) the greatest kinducss, applauded my deter. i'.nioMtion of (putting the Embassy, and allowed of mv retiring.    At the same time that he gave the ; h most favourable turn to my  rcsigne.f.'nut, ho did I* not. suffer me to suspect that, he* was. in pn.sa(.vision .of that order, of which he was the bearer.-- ! him to order me to p-paa- H>  mv dnae.e.    He I felt the value of this behaviour, when I hi! was entiiely ignorant of the motives of this or-I cameacquaiuted with the circumstance; and 1 am | der, and appeared to me to be affeeh d at it, !j happy to have it in my power to make a report |j     From him I went to the house of the Duke of lairs oi present myself before the IvhnM'.K ' ai',"i,� v:�rds saw the IViini.'-ter of S'mbhc ^v'orshi'* : he . i-'wed me a letter by which the FtU ("�.: no a t, >! >be moment.   jVoo.i l'v'r\i lives. S had bven fo 11 M. 'lie'. >r *.evci moi, i os a u (t n- fV       � u's iiviiy I no I ?w:ee v     -r d nee? 'oo ia ;,V oi' thai caci'm mo w j' .,< whe'h tije  .\a-> able : he had my It'iier-, of recall in his pocket, bur. he had not as yet i'cird them ; he remained five or six days at War-';,.w. it.was on thai occas'on that 1 had an opportunity of ob-crving him somewhat more Hoscly, and assuring myself of tin; ii regaihi: i'n�** til which lie spent his days, and of his disposition to perpeiual talking, to the iiiterinina!)!e v.xpeelaiion of whieli his inferior agents are con-deamt'd. Is was at tliis epoeii tint the scene of i't-; rat it tide  with respect to  fti.  Ar;oitK. took pis"''. bidg'u.g of the Duke from his employments, *eui fr,);!; those encouiiums which      man oj hi-  tout c.i f'-ttik has abvay; -'t his disposal, ! ha ! on ( i the < 'a-t'pou him as a urn: of talents-at least, a ma:: rd'.m '-''da- ,,-d kno-. '.edge of . lie wo. Id.    Ilejm -..'vul "r  mor" re-}>ef-j!de for tin: I; aruiy ;  S had frequently oefendcJ it a ;. a i n-.t � i ! >e '  were not. bu' l;\-. ar!   in tteyu-tf.g     ��,'' d ciejn'.! . . wrr which, imhle !   by  me'tc  t in'.7 m, :i 1 lie .'ii-.c tt'OMi    a    jo:   Oftii-r to no me honour, J ha 1 been aeooimuodatcd e; .d � i. ^ 1 h ei" ht o!      p miht,  h:i v , the <-srai;d  Aimy  was  ;.  tood(!.    Jin  sen: an t wi;lj th^- drm lang-iage, a j-bi'deiiuisl not   beiu:. 1 ofljecr to \\ai'ir.v  tore."<,\'-   iidormalio.-i   i'ro a ') po*-siblv 'aide to rouceivc'an v  thing  superior t  '. i.-rr, ;ri v esi - tane � u'or ''i  I i am ..1 �; i! a 1' 11.. -. i .'�' lid i h 1 s r ire m i; tnr ;;il('iiv.    i i.-ia liv.-d on r,;" iu .-�. terms v.-i;I ion'--- \\ e. on.; o! ibe -,;,  ,!. ad   fr. went r-lla-Oiiitted to 3 to !  biuet of Vicuna fhii '.* o '-a Dl'I'il'C  1;  1. - found. '�� � 1 hi !; e ex pta :.<  �>' (,f in r 1 -' e},u   ma- ie    lilai   1:5 d   t lie   v 111 iae t!(� li   w dr'parture he tin '.ved  at tu:   hou-a.-. sod bi.; g 1 I.   v.',,, r'u t dcuiaud- 1" a 1 i: i ' ee;. 11, o   him, , spa 1 (,'( I in a t;m- t! ,J!,-ne. I iji.niie!- : a nearer approach was b / 11(1 "team, fa/ourable to him ; he is tln,n found tf>o'- i).-u,-v, -lb-traded, destitute of the b �'-a;ree,.|,!,. f-uahties whic possess, and i cannot ch�u\g� j�g mm of being altogellu r un.iest. The v j j ! .i '  iiMOOied fo 1 istoiiliico! an Dhicer to m in- n:io'u,'d o.-,- i.jm U�e di-av.eeabl" .jfCe.-.'.jtv of di-eijai-ging a j w'sit the ol jcet of nis iiii'-mn was, ad.img, ili,t ;i c.odnn-.s. io so  erv ha, ii. S repea'-'d 1 h,. , ,;r. 5 he Wi .i.ed to be direejed aifoe-et In-.- by my conn- f y.ima .  wao long for my J m\ .-.(df Irom bu-me*.*--, :.o long a-, mai.ers wo,;)-! v-c", and toid i.aii, thai, m lie- state m which .*.' ia reins to his auger against me faaiiy hours  in   rail in in "J\''"   'u'""^ aut^  Hneigiuiig aganisi j nieiic <.r ine rerreal, reserving tlo-t.);a e. ;or u:  A>r'lveJ ut liowuo, twenty-one leagues from I useful seivie-s to wuieh Ue rui-ht be lii-.-eul'ter | aad could expiuin it IVoin the (lispleubure'^htehfrf inveighing a^a:ust oissf-/i ;        eotiijne  li-e1! t.; r.-ilow  the ; 1 fiu'iit of the retrctit, :-t.-.ei-viug tha f, $ approaemng 111 wmch t.i.- pcr-on-; < , "j toe fviqx;foi N .\ �� ( oi tm; .la'ioi: Mil, ' T"'>' �  more &     i then knew now to account; .for every 1 hi:ig   

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