Pacific Stars And Stripes, May 20, 1997, Page 3

Pacific Stars And Stripes

May 20, 1997

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Issue date: Tuesday, May 20, 1997

Pages available: 35

Previous edition: Monday, May 19, 1997

Next edition: Wednesday, May 21, 1997

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Publication name: Pacific Stars And Stripes

Location: Tokyo, Japan

Pages available: 580,340

Years available: 1948 - 1999

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Pacific Stars And Stripes (Newspaper) - May 20, 1997, Tokyo, JapanPACIFIC STARS ARD STRIPES TUfSDAY, HAY 20,1997 3 o J val last weekend. "They accept iis ipore readily than-people in most Japanese ports do." Austin, of Dallas, is a sonar technician on the USS Thach> a guided missile frigate that an- chored outside Shimoda's har- bor for the festival. BY JOSEPH OWEN Stripes Tokyo Bureau Chief SHIMODA — Anywhere else, it would seem strange to cele- brate a time when strangers came ^nd threatened to bom- bard your country's coast. But in not in Shimoda, one of Shimoda, where the United two Japanese ports that opened States set up its first diplomatic to trade after U.& Commodore post in Japan, now makes its Matthew C. Perry and his Black living from fishing, shipbuild- Ships forced Japan's shogunate mgandiood processing. government to end its two-and- a-half-century policy of isola- tion in 1854, a Judging by the accounts ofPerry's Navy successors, Shi- moda remains a very open port. Even the manhole covers are "The people here are extrabr- embossed with renderings ; of tion f[Qm the us Embassy dinanly friendly," said Petty BlackShips. • militarv bands „, ^J^Tf' on m flwfilTI g^s they did go an awful lot out of their way to make us But Perry's arrival in his fleet of sailing ships and thechange it brought to Japan still . . , form a crucial part of the city's Two ensigns from the OSS Thach share a few lawghs with Japanese men who invitedidentity. their table on a SNimoda street bSoclced off for last weekend's Black Ships Festival. Owen/Stripes ie?n to Officer 2nd Class Paul Austin U.S. participation at the festi- as he roamed among the water- vatalso mcluded a Marine color front food booths set up for the guard from Yokosuka Naval city's annual Black Ships Festi- Base's Marine Barracks, a dele- feel at home," said Petty Offi- cer 1st Class John Fowler, a postal clerk on the Thach. The Carbon Hill, ni., native said city officials gave each Thach crew member more than 4,000 yen — about $35 — in free tickets to board a Black Hiroshima are the only two cit- ies ever to be bombed with atomic weapons. "It's the warmth here. People are really nice to you," said Petty Officer 2nd Class James Reid, an engineman from Hous- Ship replica, ride a cable car ton. Ried was in the company of and attend a jazz festival. Hiroshi Nakamura, a Tokyo- Japanese lined up at one born Shimoda resident who wharf to ride a fishing boat out spontaneously invited Reid and tp°the Thach on Friday and Sat- another sailor to tour the area urday, although when the boat in his car. cleared the Izu Peninsula har- Cmdr, Gretchen Helweg, bor, the sea was too choppy to chief staff officer at Yokosuka allow boarding of the Thach for Naval Base, was one of^the tours. v Navy's representatives at a cer- "They mob us when they're emonial wreath-laying at a going out to the ship," said Pet- ty Officer 1st Class John Mark- ley, of Irvine, Calif., who was selling Thach hats, belt buckles, shirts arid other memorabilia at a small table on the wharf. Black Ships memorial /'Small, quaint and green," she said, when asked for her impressions of Shimoda. She said her British-born husband Pat Carroll also rode "The old-timers come in and in an official car in the parade The U.S. Army Japan band marches in a Saturday parade in Shimoda, Oven/Stripes show us their (USS) Carl Vin- son, Hewitt, Kitty Hawk (hats)," he said.Some sailors said Shimoda's reception was niuch friendlier than the one they received in Nagasaki, where anti-military on Saturday. Helweg said the Japanese seemed amazed to see her, a female U.S. Navy officer, wearing a dress-white uniform with a gold sword. , "That was an extrordinary experience, to be the center of protesters gathered to meet the attention for thousands of cam- ship as it arrived. Nagasaki and eras," Carroll said. . Philippiiies sends navy ship to stop Chinese incursions on shoal-•:'••' v I/ir ••* •••-• -.-•• •'•••••',-'; * •*• . J. .. . .- The Associated Press• . -.. ".-••:•• \ MANILA — The Philippines lias sent a navy ^patrol ship to guard a South China Sea shoal from Chinese incursions, De- fense Secretary Renatode Villa said Sunday. The move followed a series of protests by the two sides over ''each other's actions in disputed areas.0 De Villa said the patrol ship was sent to Scarborough Shoal, 132 miles off the western Phil- ippine province of Zambales. "We're i worried ... that these would happen over and over again," De Villa said of recent Chinese intrusions at the shoal and near Philippine-held areas in the dlsputedjjfpratly Islands, also in the South China Sea. Philippine officials say the , shoal belongs to the Philippines because it lies within its, 200- mile exclusive economic zone. ; De'Villa suggested that Pl^il- ippine sovereignty over the shoal was evident when the U.S. Navy used it for bombing and naval gunfire exercises while occupying Subic Naval Base. U.S: forces withdrew from the base in 1992. He said two Chinese boats went to.the shoal April SO^ur- portedl/'for an amateur radio ;^rotip^activity with two Am0ri- cans and a Japanese, but the Chinese planted their flag. Filipino fishermen later re- moved the flag and hoisted a Philippine flag, Philippine offi- cials said. The Chinese Embassy in Ma: nila said in a statement last Tuesda^ that Philippine navy ships drove the Chinese boats away from the shoal "unjusti- fiably," It said the 'Philippine action violated Chinese sovereignty over the shoal and warned that a repeat could strain relations. STARS ANIf STRIPES is puWisM daily: Sty (75* Sunday) per copy or $16.25 per month. Second Class Postage paid at San Francisco, Calif. (USPS 417 900) Unit 45002, APO AP $6337 ;

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