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Pacific Stars and Stripes Newspaper Archive: May 20, 1997 - Page 2

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Publication: Pacific Stars and Stripes

Location: Tokyo, Japan

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   Pacific Stars And Stripes (Newspaper) - May 20, 1997, Tokyo, Japan                              2 PACIFIC STfBS SND STBIPES TUESDAY, MM 20,1997 S3S!»f»««rThe Associated PressBALTIMORE — President Clinton in-yoked the legacy of John F. Kennedy's1960s race to the moon Sunday and set anational target of developing an AIDSvaccine within the next 10 years:"We dare not be complacent" in meet-ing tiie chaUenge of HIV, the AIDS vi-rus, Clinton said in announcing creationof a research center at .the National In-stitutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., tocomplete the task. Up to 50 researcherswill staff the suburban Washington facil-ity, drawn from existing NIH programs,and no new money was earmarked."It is no longer a question of whetherwe ran d'evelop an AIDS vaccine, it issimply a question of when. And it cannotcome a day too soon," Clinton told 850graduates of Morgan State University,the first of three commencement ad-dresses he will deliver this year.The president declared that the Unit-21 Jt if ID«• - • '.. •> tf,ed States is entering an age of advancesin biology and outlined an agenda forensuring that scientific breakthroughsbenefit all people."If the 21st century is to be the centu-ry of biology, let us make an AIDS vac-Ocine its first great triumph," he said.A vaccine is urgently needed for pre-vention, Clinton said, pointing out that 3million people around the world wereinfected with HIV last year. He notedthat the virus now ranks with tuberqulo-sis and malaria as the world's deadliestinfectious diseases.Clinton's call for a vaccine did not sat-isfy some AIDS activists, who contendedthat it is a significantly watered-downversion of his 1992 promise of a sweep-ing project to seek a cure for AIDS."This is a phony announcement," saidWayne Turner, Washington spokesmanfor the AIDS Activist group ACT-UP."He^ talks the big talk* but all he's doingis reshuffling a couple dozen employees.He's talking a prevention vaccine. That'swriting off me lives of millions of peoplewho've been infected."Jose Zuniga, spokesman for the advo-cacy group AIDS Action, said Clintonmust ensure that researchers developingprotease inhibitors, promising develop-ments in the search for AIDS cures, arenot taken away to pursue a vaccine.Zuniga also urged Clinton not to drainmonies from social -support programsfor AIDS sufferers, such as housing andMedicaid, to fund vaccine research.Roughly $148 million is devoted to thevaccine work in Clinton's budget for thefiscal year beginning Oct. 1, $17 millionmore than last year, said Sandy Thur-mafl, the president's AIDS adviser.Clinton said he will enlist other na-tions in vaccine research next month,when he meets with leaders of theGroup of Seven industrialized nations inDenver. "If America commits" to lindenAIDS vaccine^ and we enlist others inour cause, we will do it."Clinton compared the search for anAIDS Vaccine with President Kennedy'schallenge 36 years ago, in 1961, to put aman on the moon before 1970."He gave us the goal of reaching themoon, and we achieved it ahead oftime," ,Clinton said. "Today, let us lookwithin and step up to the challenge ofour time."The Associatf/'PressI NEW Y0J8C — Parents, friends andlovers left behind in the AIDS epidemicwere among 35,000 people who took toCentral Park on Sunday to honor thedead and raise millions of dollars."It's such a beautiful day and such animportant cause," said Eva Friedman)who walked the six-mile charity routewit& two teen-age goddaughters.fil lost a very incredible and wonder-ful Mend to AIDS. He was only 29," saidFriedman, 43.Walking with about 50 other Sony em-"ployees, George McGUnchey, 64, re-membered his 41-year-old son, who diedof AIDS two years ago. .- „"If everybody did more, it would be amuch better world," he said.The/12th annual AIDS Walk in NewYork-benefits Gay Men's Health Crisis,which provides services to AIDS pa-tients, operates prevention programsand does advocacy work.Organizers said they hoped to raise upto $5 million through the walk.Fund-raising documents accord hearThe Associated Press, WASHINGTON — The White Houseand House Republicans are close to anamicable resolution of a bitter disputeover documents subpoenaed in a Houseinvestigation of Democratic campaign fi-nancing, said the committee chairmaninvolved <:Rep. Dan Burton, R-Ind., said on "FoxNews Sunday," once the-dispute is re-solved, his Government Reform andOversight Committee will drop its threatof a contempt citation against V^hiteHouse officials. But if it falls apart, thecommittee will go ahead with contemptcitations as early as Wednesday.Burton has ^accused the White Houseof failing to produce documents aboutfund-raiser John Huang, Indonesianbusinessman James Riady and WebsterHubbell, a former associate attorneygeneral.The White House contends it is coop-erating but claims some documents onthe list are protected by attorney-clientprivilege because they are notes takenby White House lawyers. The WhiteHouse also is seeking guarantees thatmaterial will be kept confidential.Burton said agreement has beenclearly reached on surrendering, somefldocuments but not others.One focus of Burton's investigations iswhether China, partly through Asian-Americali fund-raisers for the Demo-crats, tried to influence U.S. policythrough campaign contributions lastyear.Zhu Rongji, China's deputy primeminister, quoted Sunday by Newsweekmagazine, denied a report that Chinasent nearly $1 million to its consulatesand Washington embassy in 1995 to winfavor; with U.S. politicians.EEV bans firing practiceat Cape Cod Guard baseThe Associated PressBOURNE, Mass. — For the first time,military training has been suspended forenvironmental and public health reasonsas a top environmental official upheld aban on shooting practice at the pollutedMassachusetts Military Reservation.Frederic Hansen, the EnvironmentalProtection Agency's deputy administra-tor, agreed Friday that chemicals andlead from spent shells on firing rangeson the Cape Cod base threaten publichealth and the drinking supply for200,000 residents.The EPA reports thaf a $165 millioncleanup of toxic substances beneath thebase has been a failure.The order requires the Army NationalGuard to suspend all training at the baseinvolving propellants and pyrotechnics.ABBY CLARKE Call From Anywhere In Japan.Sterving Japan since 1994"Same low rate 24 hrs a dayNo monthly fc i^n-iip fc-t-No monthly minimumDiscount rat:<-% iu other counti it'• Bill to Visa. Atm-x, MC, DiscoverDiners or Bank Debit1 Available to family andfrit-lids in tin.- U.S. at 37cMiiin.Save up tofV ^5SHi^^ 4f ~^K$*DSN: 222-6980/5672From off base: 0176-152-6442E-mail: info@militel-jp.comWeb site: http://www.militel-jp.comlease 11 or Lease #2Fee * $99Deposit $0*Monthly Fee '$8* ($20) $0Jotal$149$107 $549arcby ClintonThe Associated PressWASHINGTON — The 37 U.S. Navymen who died in the 1987 Iraqi missileattack on the Mgate Stark were remem-bered as national heroes on the 10th an-niversary of the Middle East tragedy."The American people will not forgetthe sacrifice your loved ones made tokeep our nation secure," President Clin-ton said in a message to relatives andMends of the 37 gathered under grayskies at. the Arlington National Cemeteryceremony Saturday. "We are gratefulfor the live& tney lived, proud of the' waythey served and determined to build afuture for this country that is worthy oftheir selfless sacrifice."The Stark, a guided missile Mgate,was among Navy ships patrolling thePersian Gulf to protect oil tankers dur-ing the Iran-Iraq war. Hie United Statesprotested the attack and accepted Iraqi'sclaim that it had been inadvertent.Both the Stark's commander and itstask force chief sai4 after the May 17,1987, incident that the frigate was takenby surprise because U.S. patrols at thattime — three years before Iraq's inva-sion of Kuwait'— regarded Iraqi planesasMeridly."That day, our lives changed, and 37Navy sailors became heroes at the costof their lives," "retired Vice Adm. Mi-chael P. Kalieres told about 100 peopleat the ceremony, sponsored by NoGreater Love, a humanitarian organiza-tion dedicated to providing comfort andfriendship to survivors of Americanswho lost their lives in military service gras victims of terrorism. • " .Kalleres, now ^corporation president,was* commander of the cruiser-destroyer.group arthe Stark's home port at May-oport, Fla.Names, of all <37. were read -as teen-agers in the Naval Sea Cadet unit at theWashingtort Navy. Yard and family0meij£-bers placed roses on me graves.  

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