Pacific Stars And Stripes, August 6, 1978, Page 16

Pacific Stars And Stripes

August 06, 1978

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Issue date: Sunday, August 6, 1978

Pages available: 31

Previous edition: Saturday, August 5, 1978

Next edition: Monday, August 7, 1978

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Publication name: Pacific Stars And Stripes

Location: Tokyo, Japan

Pages available: 580,340

Years available: 1948 - 1999

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All text in the Pacific Stars And Stripes August 6, 1978, Page 16.

Pacific Stars And Stripes (Newspaper) - August 6, 1978, Tokyo, JapanSUNDAY, AUGUST 6, 1978 PACIFIC STARS AND STRIPES PAGE 11 Higgins eyes 'Harold's Story' By MARILYN BECKH OLLYWOOD — You've probably heardthat Paramount will be bringing us "Oliver's Story," the sequel to "Love Story,"But you couldn't have heard that Colin Higgins now wants to bring us "Harold's Story—because the writer-director has just dreamed up the idea of basing a film on thecharacter who survived "Harold and Maude." If you're part of the ever-growinginternational cult of "Harold and Maude," you already know that the 1971 romantic blackcomedy about a lad in his 20s (Bud Cort) and his septuagenarian love (Ruth Gordon) hasMaude meeting her final end at film's end. But Higgins, who wrote the screenplay as hismaster's thesis at UCLA, tells me he'd like to work with Cort again, "and I want to write a film that would focus on Harold's life withoutMaude." Not that he wouldn't also like to work withRuth Cordon again. He has, in fact, been seriously thinking of a "Harold and Maude"prequel, to be titled "Grover and Maude," that would focus on the lady before Haroldentered her life — and while she was learning such tricks as stealing cars from the Grovercharacter Richard Pry or brought to life in Higgins' "Silver Streak." Naturally, he'dwant Richard and Ruth to be "Grover and Maude."Right now Higgins is watching the impressive box-office scores on his new "FoulPlay," and preparing "The Man Who Lost Tuesday." United Feature Syndicate Hal Kaufman BULLETIN BOARD 9 CASH FLOW! "If they stop making pennies/' says Ima Wagg, "we'll have to pinch CLEKINS." Rearrange cap-letters for a word that makes sense. •S|d)p!U s; PJOM fc Challenge: Find a flower in each sentence, if you can: 1. Short hair is in. 2. Ada is your aide. 3. Ed is a sterling fellow. 't -su| IT SEEMS very peculiar, but no matter what number is selected between 10 and 999, the answer will always be either 9 or 18'if you figure as follows: First: Add the digits in the number selected and subtract the result from the number itself. Next: Add the digits in the new number and the result will be 9 or 18, as predicted. For example: Let's take the number 721. Add the digits and the sum is 1.0. Subtract 10 from 721 and the result is 711. Add these digits and you get 9. Now, similarly, try it with another number at random. • Funny Age! The sum of our ages is 22. I shall be seven times my brother's present age when his age reaches half of mine. How old am I now? •jnoj s,3M .'U38|i|6ia tu,i 9 Riddle-Me-This! What did the ice cream say to the apple pie? "You've got a crust!" What gets wetter the more it dries? A dish towel. I 3? fO- n' I ALL ABOARD! Find, if you can, the one route in five that carries the skateboard rider above to destination X. Solutions toThis Week's Puzzles Copyright by Chicago Tribune-N.Y. News Syndicate DONALD PLEASENCE British character actor is really closet rock freak By VERNON SCOTTH OLLYWOOD (UPI)— At first blush the presence of Donald Pleasencein the cast of "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band"would seem an anomaly akin to Shelley Winters playingright field for the Dodgers. Pleasence is the distin-guished British character actor, a native of Notting-hamshire, educated at Sheffield, a member of theBristol Old Vic Company arid a trouper with Sir LaurenceOlivier's company of "An- thony and Cleopatra.""Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band" is a rockopera starring Peter Framp- ton and the Bee Gees. So faras Pleasence knows, neither Frampton nor the Bee Geeshad ever acted a day before in their lives.One imagines Pleasence stuffing his ears with cottonbefore reporting to work. One also conjectures thathe reconstitutes his innate, middle-aged conservativeBritish taste by listening to Beethoven at the end of theday's work with the pop music specialists.One reflects on Pleasence giving acting instructions tohis costars with avuncular concern.But no. Pleasence shatters all the illusions of hisprevious screen roles. He is a closet rock freak who wasenchanted with the apparent miscasting."I actually like the music of the Bee Gees and Frampton avery great deal," said the balding actor, bearded for hisrole as B.D. Brockhurst, a miserably mean and oilyrecord company mogul in. the picture."I have two teen-age daughters who play rockmusic throughout the house morning, noon and night. Ifind myself listening and enjoying it all."My wife, Meira Shore, is a professional singer whowrites her own stuff and is about to sign a recordingcontract. She specializes in folk-rock, I suppose. Meira isfrom Israel and her music has a Middle Eastern sound."It turns out, moreover, that one of Pleasence's close palsis none' other than Ringo Starr, the erstwhile Beatle."I wrote the lyrics for a recent Ringo album," saidPleasence with no little pride. "And I recorded the narra-tion for 'Scouse The Mouse,' taken from a children's book."Mark you, I don't claim to be a singer although I've beentold I have a rather good voice." WORD-A-DAY By BACH THE ROBBER/ SU6PECT16 A SHABBV, IMBECILIC, WEIRD LOOKING, LITTLE RUNTWItH ABI6N06EI! f ^ i-*- ^ /(pvoeo-pog ra- DESCRIPTION Of THE FACET OR PERSONAL APPEARANCE" This Week's Cryptograms 1. If you are truly wise your head won't swell when fed truth.2. Strong strings pulls, breaks from strain of strange cumbersome package,3. Angry hostess fumes when churlish guest lets potato chips fall where they may.4. Fashion bazaar at ritzy country club features bizarre clothes. ;

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