Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Pacific Stars and Stripes Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1955 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Pacific Stars and Stripes

Location: Tokyo, Japan

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Pacific Stars and Stripes (Newspaper) - September 6, 1955, Tokyo, Japan                                'stery Man Tricks Reds IntoBy Joseph FlemingBERLIN (UP) — The. Rus-sians Monday released twoAmerican sold-iers, held inSoviet prisonsfor more than, seven y e a r s,and a mysteryman who trick-ed the Rus-sians into free-ing him be-"cause they• thought he was 8£American. f1The mystery Hopkinsman gained his freedom be-cause he posed as FrederickC. Hopkins of New York City.It took American interrogatorsfive hours to determine thatHopkins—if that really is hisname—was not an American."He fooled the Soviets, buthe could not fool us," an Armyspokesman said. "We do notknow who, he" is. He is not an-American. Perhaps he is Ger-man. He is an enigma."Hopkins was not the onlyprisoner who tricked the Rus-sians into releasing- him". Tues-day two Germans posed asDanes to get out of Russia.The two soldiers, turned overto American authorities Tues-day at Soviet headquarters atKarlshorst, are Pvt. Wilfred C.Cumish, 39, Amesbury, Mass.,and Pvt. Michael Feingersch,36, .Brooklyn. Feingersch, wasalso known under the name ofFields.The soldiers both complainedthey needed medical attentionand they were placed underguard in the U.S. Army hospi-tal here. Theyboth have beenlisted as absentwithout leave.The twoAmericans andHopkins werereleased alongwith 24 otherprisoners—twoF r e n c-h, sixDutchmen, twoDanes, twoSwiss, eight -CumishBelgians and four Germans.Hopkins was a puzzle to theAmericans from the start.The State Department hadasked for the release of Cum-ish and Feingersch, and theSoviets replied they would re-lease the two soldiers andHopkins as well. The Ameri-cans had never heard that anyAmerican named Hopkins wasin Russian captivity. Andnever before had the Russiansvolunteered to release ,anAmerican without an Americanrequest.Insists He's AmericanHopkins on his release firstmaintained he was an Ameri-can soldier. Then he insistedhe was an American civilian.He would give the Americansno help in determining his realnationality.Nevertheless, the armytreated him the same : waythey jdid the two Americansoldiers. They fed him, gavehim clean new .pajamas andtoilet articles and sent him tothe army hospital for a physi-cal along with the soldiers.American authorities saidHopkins would * - ?remain in theh o s p i t al atleast until Wed-nesday.Another Ger-man releasedwas a Germancousin of Prin-ce Bernhardtof the Nether-lands. He wasPrince H e i n-.rich Zur Lippe-Biesterfeld. He was capturedon the Eastern front whileserving with the Germanarmy, other returnees aaid.Swiss authorities said theywere investigating.FeinjferscliRIPESUNOFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF UNITED STATES FORCES, FAR EAST*****Vol. IV No. 248 Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1955Israel ApologizesFor Truce RiftJERUSALEM, -Israel (INS) —Israel apologizedMonday for a "regrettable error" by a patrol whichfired on Egyptian forces seven hours after aceasefire took effect in the Gaza tinderbox.SO LONG, SAN FRANCISCO—Leslie Han-dry, 59, waves good-by from his 14-foot row-boat as he leaves San Francisco for a 120-mile trip to Sacramento. He plans to makethe yoyag'fe in six to nine days. In 1926,Handry rowed from San Francisco to Stock-ton and has planned the trip to Sacramentoever since. . (UP Photo)TOKYO (INS)—A Far EastAir Force spokesman said Mon-day that two of four twin-engine B-57 light bombers Cap-able of carrying atomic bombsarrived in Japan Sunday after-noon./, The spokesman said tnespeedy American jets toucheddown at Ydkota Air Base north-west of Tokyo at 2 p.m. Sundayafter completing a 10,000-mileflight from the U.S.He said one of the B-57s wasgrounded at Kwajalein due toengine trouble and "that thefourth plane was standing byto continue the flight to Japanwhen repairs are completed.0 The spokesman said the B-57swill be assigned to the ThirdBomb Wing which is stationedat Johnson Air Base near To-kyo.25 Injured in OhioAs Trains CollideBUCYRUS, O. (AP) —Twenty-five more people wereinjured early Monday morningwhen" the Manhattan Limited,Pennsylvania Railroad train,traveling from New York toChicago, collided with an east-bound freight four miles westof here.Southern California'Cools Off to 99LOS ANGELES, Cal. (AP)—The sun eased up a bit onscorched southern CaliforniaMonday. It was only 99 de-grees fahrenheit in Los An-:geles. •For the last five days ithas been 101 or higher withlast Thursday's 110 settingan all-time record for LosAngeles.The coroner's office Mon-day listed some 40 deaths asdue primarily to heat or inwhich heat was a heavilycontributing factor.Gladys Hits Texas,Threatens FloodBROWNSVILLE, Tex. (AP)—The sloppily-formed stormcalled Gladys struck land "Mon-day" with windjs within a breathof hurricane force, then sweptto the northwest where resi-dents braced themselves forwhat disaster agencies saymay become more criticalflooding;Persons in the storm's pathremembered last year's stormAlice /which cost hundreds -oflives—no one knows how many—and wiped out great sectionsof towns on the Mexican sideof the Rio Grande. It was thesatme ;sort of storm as Gladys.Paris RaidNabs AfricansPARIS (UP)—Police round-ed up hundreds of North Af-ricans Monday in a nation-wide crack-down on National-ist subversion.It was the biggest police op-eration in France since themass raids on Communist lo-cals and headquarters in 1952.Several hundred Algerianssuspected of belonging to theanti-F r e n c h "revolutionaryNorth African committee"were taken into custody ' andwill be 'shipped to Algeria forquestioning.Algeria's outlaw "nationalliberation army," popularlyknown as the "army of Allah,"reportedly ' has branches inFrance. .Police said many of thosearrested had pressured Alger-ians to contribute money forsecret funds to finance anti-French terrorism.Meanwhile on Madagascar,the exiled sultan of MoroccoMohammed Ben Youssef Mon-day received two high Frenchofficials in a moment of. tri-umph over the country whichdrove him abruptly from histhrone two years ago.Gen. Georges Catroux, oneof France's most distinguishedmilitary men, and HenryYrissou, a top Qua! D'Orsay(Continued • on Page 2, Col. 1)Labor DayTraffic TollRises to 357CHICAGO (AP) —"The U.S.Labor Day holiday weekendtraffic toll pushed relentlesslytoward a new record high Mon-day.Traffic deaths, had Claimed357 persons from 6 p.m. EST.,Friday, when the count started,to 6 p.m. EST., Monday. LastLabor Day the count at thesame time was 310.At least 62 drownings and 68violent deaths in all othertypes of accidents, had combin-ed with the auto toll for anover-all 487 at that point.The counting will cover aperiod of *78 hours for the threeday holiday .weekend.For that period last year,there were 364 traffic deaths,92 drownings, and 83 lives lostin miscellaneous accidents, atotal of 539.TheJapan to Get LoanWASHINGTON (INS)export-import bank has approv-ed a loan under -which Japanwill get $60 million to purchaseU.S. cotton between now andnext July 31. ( 'newA U.N. spokesman said trucesupervisor General E7 L. M.Burns did not think the incidentat Tobat el Asra affected theceasefire in any way.An Israeli Army spokesmansaid a patrol which lost its waycrossed the border by error.He said three Israeli soldierswere missing after a clash thatfollowed the border crossing.Egypt said four Isi-aelis werekjllcd in fighting which startedwhen a 20-man Israeli patrolfired on its forces.The new ceasefire becameeffective shortly before 5 p.m.Sunday, when Egypt's accep-tance was received by U.N.headquarters in Gaza. Burn'sheadquarters said both Israela.nd Egypt had given "uncondi-tional" agreement to the truce.Sudanese RebelsSurrenderingKHARTOUM, Sudan (UP)—The Sudan Government forcesMonday continued their mop-ping up operations in the re-bellious south as more mutin-eers surrendered and quanti-ties of arms were recovered.At Torit, center of the rebel-lion, 24 mutineers surrenderedSunday bringing the total sofar to four officers and 119men.At Kapoete Sudan forcesfound a large quantity of am-munition and arms, vehiclesand wireless equipment in goodcondition.Colonel Who Flew 822 MPHSet World Record, AF RevealsAP RadiophotoF-100C CRACKS SPEED RECORD OVER CALIFORNIA DESERTPHILADELPHIA, Pa. (UP)—Air Force Col. Horace A.Hanes set a world's speed rec-ord of 822.135' m.p.h. in an F-100C Super Sabre jet 16' daysago to win the Thompson Tro-phy, the Air Force disclosedofficially at the national air-show here Monday.The flight shattered the pre-vious record of 755 m.p.h.The 39-year-old senior testpilot made the new record runover a 18.1110 kilometer (ap-proximately 11 miles) courseAug. 20 near Palmdale, Cal.,in the Thompson Trophy test.  

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication