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Pacific Stars and Stripes Newspaper Archive: October 17, 1949 - Page 1

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Publication: Pacific Stars and Stripes

Location: Tokyo, Japan

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   Pacific Stars And Stripes (Newspaper) - October 17, 1949, Tokyo, Japan                              WEATHER REPOR*October 18pressure area still overTokyo, Japan. On Tuesday, fair,becoming cloudy at night; maxi-mum temperature 78, minimum,62. Outlook for Wednesday,cloudy with rain. STARS AND STRIPEDon't D-e-l-a-y-Mail Christmas GiftsTODAYVOLUME 5, NUMBER 247 SHARE THIS PAPER MONDAY, October 17, 1949 SHARE THIS PAPER UP, AP, INS, AFPS, WIRE SERVICES11 Reds PlanTo Ask Bail;AppealNEW YORK (INS)—The 11convicted Communist partyleaders are expected to peti-tion the U.S. Court of AppealsMonday to grant them freedomon bail while they appeal theverdict.Their $5,000 bail was discon-tinued when the jury return-ed a verdict of guilty againstthem last Friday. They wereremanded to jail to await sen-tencing this Friday, when theymay receive a maximum pe-nalty of ten years imprison-ment and $10,000 fines.THE FIVE LAWYERS forthe convicted 11—themselvesunder jail sentences rangingfrom 30 days to six monthsfor contempt during the longtrial—said they will ask theCourt of Appeals to reverseFederal Judge Harold Medi-na's remanding order.The attorneys are preparingmotions for a new trial, for anarrest of judgment, and a mo-tion to quash their own con-tempt sentences before theNov. 15 deadline set for theirsurrender to the U.S. MarshalTHE MOTIONS for a newtrial will be based on a con-tention that Judge Medina'scharge to the.jury of eightwomen, and four men onThursday contained interpre-tations of the Constitutionnot in accord with any priordecision by the U.S. SupremeCourt. .• " *MOSCOW (INS)—The FirstRussian reaction to the NewYork; court conviction of 11U.S. Communist Communistleaders was contained Sat-urday in a Tass report head-lined "rough justice."The official Soviet NewsAgency said in a dispatchdatelined New York and dis-tributed in Moscow that theease0 vent .to: the jury "afterJudge (Harold) Medina inaccordance with usual procedure 'instructed' the jurors intheir ^interests' on the legaquestion. . . .""HOWEVER," the Tas*account continued, "Medina"'unbiased* resume was donewith extreme-prejudice againsthe Community party leaderand was favorable to the prosecution which strove to :attain prohibition of the Communist party."* • • *WASHINGTON (UP)—JohnF. X. McGohey, successfugovernment prosecutor of thenation's top 11 Communists,was nominated by PresidentTruman today to be a fed-eral judge.Red Peril Near,Quirino WarnsMANILA (AP)—PresidentElpidio Quirino warned Fili-pinos that the threat of com-munism was "nearer thanmost of us realize."In a campaign talk before,000 tenant farmers at Pani-ui, central Luzon, he stressedic proximity of China toicse islands and declaredalready the agents of dan-erous ideology are in yourmidst and coming to you atead of night. Throughireats and intimidation theyre forcing you to help themmplant a form of life whichwould imprison not only yourhoughts but your feeling."Quirino warned that "ua-ess care is exercised in thepproaching presidential elec-ion, the Philippines may againuffer as it did during theapanese occupation."It was an off-hand referenceo his chief presidential riviFose P. Laurel who is candidate of the Nacionalista partjn the Nov. 8 election.Quirino has been devotingmost of his electioneeringagainst Laurel who headec;he puppet Philippine Republiiduring the Japanese occupation.Smtrts Relieved as HeaOf South African ForceJOHANNESBURG (AP>—Field Marshal Jan ChristiarSmuts has been relieved of hispost as commander in chief oSouth Africa's defense forcein the field and placed on thretired list..Defense Minister F. CErasmus has sent a letter tSmuts telling him of the actiotaken by the governor generain council.China Policy Statement SeOTTAWA (UP)—ActinExternal Affairs MinisteBrooke Claxton told the Sousof Commons that the governnient would make a statemenon its policy toward -Chinafter conferring with Ambassador T. C. Davis who is enroute here.fehru VisitingAt Hyde Park;Acclaims FDRHYDE PARK (UP)—Indian'rime Minister Jawaharlal'andit Nehru arrived herevhere he was met by Mrs.Sleanor Roosevelt.He was taken to the Roose-elt Memorial Library, then)roceeded to the grave sitevhere he placed a wreath ontie tomb of President FranklinX Roosevelt.Later he lunched with Mrs.;oosevelt at her Valkillottage on the Rooseveltstate.Paying tribute to Roosevelt,'tfehru said, "This is a greatnd solemn moment for men having the honor to comeo the home of one of thegreatest men of our genera-ion."Nehru said for many yearshe had hoped to meet Pres-dent Roosevelt and that hewas very grieved because hehad never seen him personally.Nehru paid tribute to Mrs.Roosevelt herself for "yourgreat work for the cause ofmmanity."Mrs. Roosevelt said she feltNehru's visit to the UnitedStates would be a great bene-fit to this country because'you bring us some of thatmoral strength that we feelso strongly in you.". The Indian Prime Ministerwill dine later Monday withPublisher David Walsh andhis wife who is novelist PearlBuck. • * » *NEW YORK (INS)—NewYork City literally rolled outthe red carpet Saturday togreat Prime Minister Jawa-harlal Nehru of India on hisarrival from Washington fora six day visit.The red carpet—interna-tional symbol of welcome:—was spread for Nehru atLaGuardia ' Airport when hestepped from a U.S. Air ForceConstellation plane. . - .On hand to receive the In-dian Prime Minister was NewYork's number one welcomerGrover Whalen, who extend-ed to the distinguished visitor1st ChiWALKER SAYS GOODBYE—U.S. Army Chief of StaffGeneral ]. Lawton Collins (right) is shown getting a part-ing handshake from Lt. Gen. Walton H. Walker, EighthArmy commanding general, before departing by plane forWashington from Haneda Airport, Tokyo Monday morn-ing. General Collins cut short his tour of FEC Army in-stallations in response to a request for his return fromthe Secretary of the Army. (U.S. Army Photo)TOKYO (UP)—Army Chiefof Staff General J. LawtonCollins took off from Hanedaairport for Washington at 9:06a.m. Monday, cutting short histour of the Far East in orderto -testify before the HouseArmed Services committee onunification.General Collins revealed hetook an'extra day, despite histl.2 compliments, df MayorWilliam O'Dwyer.In Democratic JapanNEW YORK (INS)—DavidSentner, Washington corre-spondent for the New YorkJournal-American, said Sun-day that a great provingground for democracy versuscommunism lies in Japan.Sentner, who recently re-turned: from a flying surveyof Japan; said the stakes aremighty — intensified by thesweep of the Red Armythrough China.Sentner, in his article pub-lished Sunday by the Journal-American, reported:"A Communist victory overdemocracy in Japan wouldhave disastrous global rever-ULL£TINSNuns Attacked in Bowery; 153 NabbedNEW YORK (UP)—Police arrested 153 men on chargesof disorderly conduct in a wholesale raid on the Bowery—New York's "street of forgotten men"—following an attackon two nuns. The nuns were en route to register for votingWhen.they were attacked in broad daylight by three mendescribed as habitues of the Bowery. It was the largest arrestever staged in the Bowery, A night court magistrate gave103 of them suspended sentences and sent the other 50 tojail for 30 days—unusually stiff sentences for disorderlyconduct. •» * * * *Five Injured in Downtown Naples RiotNAPLES, Italy (UP)—Five persons were seriously injuredand Z5 arrested during a riot between Communists and neoFascists in downtown Naples. The injured were two policemen and three.demonstrators. The riot broke out when theleader of the neo-Fascist Balkan Social Movement, GiorgiiAlmirante, addressed a mass rally of 3,000 followers in thPiazza Matteotti. Several hundred Communists attacked thtneo-Fascists with sticks, stones and firecrackers.*****British Try To Reach Red AgreementWASHINGTON (AP)—Britain has been making anearnest effort to reach a practical working basis with thChinese Communists in the current negotiations at Peipingdiplomatic authorities said Sunday.*****Russian Envoy to New China ArrivesTOKYO (UP)—The Peiping Communist radio monitoreby the United Press in Tokyo said N. V. Roshehin, first Russianambassador to "new China," presented his credentials tChairman Mao Tze-tung of the "Central People's Governmenton Sunday afternoon. The Soviet ambassador was accompanied by 11 diplomatic personnel of the Soviet Embassy.rush order home, to visit Oki-nawa Sunday because "I wasso concerned about living con-ditions there."General Collins was high inhis praise of General Mac-Arthur's use of Americanroops in the Occupation ofapan. He said he had beenmpressed during his briefisit "with the way GeneralVlacArthur has bent overBackwards to give the Japa-nese a fair break!"The troopslave encroached to a veryHONGKONG (AP)—Com-munist columns sweepingthrough the Canton region tothe south China Sea have splitNationalist China into threewidely separated centers ofresistance.Several minor Nationalistpositions, such as the islandcity of Amoy and the ChushanIslands; are under attack andtheir • quick 'liquidation isthreatened.OTHER Nationalist frontsare buckling under pressure» • »SteamerBy Reds' GunsHONGKONG (UP)—Com-munist guns bombarded theBritish steamer Anhui when itwas leaving Amqy, killingthree Chinese passengers andwounding 25 others.The Anhui arrived at Hong-kong Sunday with three shell-holes, carrying 1,400 passeng-ers fleeing from the Red-threatened port. The deadconsisted of a young man, awoman and a little girl 'agedfive.Officers said the vessel wasunder fire for 15 minutes dur-which over 20 shells from Redland batteries straddled theship 20 minutes after it leftAmoy.erations. Red fascism wouldnundate Europe under thedeological impact. A €ommu-ist Japan would drop all Asiavith its billion population andntold resources into the lapf Red Russia."A Communist Japan wouldnnihilate American defenseommunications in the Pacific,aying bare the West Coast ofTOKYO (AP)—"We've gotto do something about hous-ing conditions at: Okinawa,"Army Chief of Staff J. LawtonCollins said before boarding hisplane to speed back to Wash-ington. Okinawa suffered ty-phoon damage recently.*1f the people,at home knewhow things were there, theywouldn't stand for it." He ad-ded, "Okinawa has the requi-sites of an -excellent base. Itsairfields still are gperable buthe United Statesttack."Once again,to SovietGeneral5ouglas MacArthur is holdinghe fort—and well."He is licking communism inTapan."There never was a morefertile field for sowing Com-munist seeds than when theirst United States groups land-ed in Japan on Sept. 19, 1945."Cities were devastated.The nation was in economiccollapse. The population waserrorized from the a-bomb.Japan's vaunted militaristeadership threw in theirswords. The Japanese em-peror publicly renounced hisdivinity. The war cost Japanthe lives of 1,550,000 soldiersand 290,000 civilians, mostlyyoung men. Three millionhouses were burned, leaving8,800,000 persons homeless."Japan's financial loss fromthe war amounted to $15,700,-000.000, one-fourth of its na-tional wealth."Grief and despair, to befomented with hatred of theconqueror! Here was a per-fect recipe as prescribed byMarx, Lenin, and Stalin forbrewing of communism in awitch's cauldron."Moscow vetoed any peacetreaty with Japan and bidedtime to pluck the red plumin the Pacific."A detailed saga of howGeneral MacArthur broughtorder out of chaos is onrecord. Within a few yearsof the occupation, the Japa-nese nation has rejected Redfascism and is eagerly seek-ing the American way of life."Even in Hiroshima andNagasaki, the a-bombed cities,the Japanese CommunistsSee PROVING GROUNDPajgjs 4t, Col 3some maintenance work isneeded, of course."Galled back from his- inspec-tion trip to tell the Armed Ser-vices Committee the Army'sposition, in the dispute overU.S. strategy, Collins declin-ed to reveal what he willsay to Navy charges the Armyand Air Force representativescombined to outvote the NavyHe likewise declined com-ment on the strategic import-ance of Formosa, or to extendhis remarks on the politicavalue of holding Okinawa. Buhe was voluble in praise owhat American troops havedone in Japan and of the cooperation shown by the Japanese.minimum, on the Japaneseeconomy. For example, uparound Sendai they have gonento the hills for field trainingo avoid interfering with thearea's economic recovery."!?He said he Had found Ameri-can trooprtraiiiing "comingalong fine" in that part of.he occupaton area he visitedsefore his inspection tour wasnterrupted. "I've been delight-ed with what I've seen....We're getting the troops backinto fighting shape again."He cited for particular praisea simulated infantry attack,using live ammunition, by acompany of the Seventh Divi-sion. . "Those men were reallyabsorbed in it. You'd havethought a real war was .on.'Collins avoided all questionson his testimony before theHouse committee regardingArmed Forces unification.He pointed out that he
                            

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