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Kingston Gleaner Newspaper Archive: August 13, 1941 - Page 1

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   Gleaner, The (Newspaper) - August 13, 1941, Kingston, Kingston                               I t It'S GLEANER FOOTBALL COMPETITION m Prizes-id for Each Cross Page 10 Entries Close Saturday 23rd. W. W w w v j ft H L J W W p j i. i r i T 11 r' f J j. j 11 i XX V .7 J fc f 1 J 3 J M4 Irf FIRST PRIZE 1 See Page 10 for Coupon and Rules ESTABLISHED 1834 J J'- ESTABLISHED 1834 THE -SWl-SMItES ALL DAY LONG on Rum-Drlnki made with MYERS'S RUM Mature 0 to Bond Bottled in Bond FRED Whir SIXTEEN PAGES Vol. CVH. Ntr. AUGUST 1941. PENNY SIXTEEN PAGES I- 'If Japan Wants War There Will Be War STTl 1 ATTftN Ml 1 1 IVy 111 1 Ace Is Aug. Commander Douglas leg- less English who the R.A.F. Canadian' squadron through the Battle of Britain a year ago was reported missing to- day.. He down fifteen planes and last month was awarded the D.S.O. and Press by Cable and Wireless Ltd. ears port ant But Russians 4 J Invaders ments Aug. 12 _ ._ Further moves to put Japan on a full war basis have been reported. Japanese stock exchange activities are being placed under direct 'control of the Japanese Minister of and Industry. The Finance Ministry announced that the regulations ADMIRAL DARLAN. for the freezing of foreign assets in Japan will not be applied in the case of those nations which gave reciprocal treatment to Japanese nationals in countries where Japanese assets been frozen. According to reports Indo-China has prohibited all ex- port merchandise except to Japan. An authoritative source in London said Lond on Press arlan Marks Tension O ver Pacifi Gets re August 12_ The ten- sion over the developments in the Pacific is marked the Press. t Japan wants war in the Pacific there will be war. If she The Daily Mail wants peace there will be Powers of a nature unspecified are ex j pected there shortly. situation in the Far East at -the flash point. We Reuters received a cryptic dispatch from Tokyo saying shall know within a few days Now Controls possibly hours Japan rrr A- r I r-- tnai.. uaessa nas oeen ibuittbcu. intends to continue her. acts of And Air ForCCS Of rrdllCe The correspondent report- THE GERMANS MAKING THEIR MOST DESPER- ATE PUSH IN THE RUSSIAN CLAIMED LAST TO HAVE REACHED POINTS ON THE BLACK SEJJLCOASTi THE LATEST RUSSIAN COMMUNIQUE OTHER HAND GAVE NO HINT OF ANY SERI- OUS BREAK IN THEIR LINES NOR OF ANY CONSIDER- ABLE.GERMAN ADVANCE IN THIS AREA OR ANY OTHER SECTOR. OF THE FRONT. Informed circles in London said it was probable that small enemy advance units might have thrust ahead in a direction east of and it was pointed out. that the Germans might be following their usual practice of making claims on large suc- cesses on the. strength of achievement of small advance units. The Russians in this sector appeared to be making an order- ly but the Germans had not reached their proclaimed objectives. Neither will the Germans get the coveted wheat of the Ukraine. Behind the Russian lines a record harvest is being gathered and secured out of the German reach. GERMAN ODESSA CLAIM Aug. tive quarters here today estimated that a number of German armoured were only about forty miles from the big gram port of Nikolaev oh the Black Sea. The Germans claimed tonight that... Odessa has been isolated. aggression until involves the dta -m IB Unknown Man Found Dead Near Rockfort Naked but with no signs of phy- A square-jawed piece .ol fighting man power Uiop is Douglas Robert Stewart Acting No. 242 all Canadians Aside from the fact that one day in he led his men into a tightly two-tiered formation of from 70 to 100 Messer- schmitt 110's and Heinkel getting eight of the former and the latter with never a hole any ol his the remarkable thing about Acting. Squadron Leader Bader is thai he has Bader used to be.one of R.A.F's stunt aces. In 1931 he crashed a Bristol Bulldog near Reading and woke tap to find all his under- pinning use a he learned to manu-. pulate a pair of lightweight duralumin DeSoutter limbs nimbly-ihat resumed cricket. He took up. even learned to dp a back- ward 'somersault. He also went back to got a civil license. When tK'e war he pestered the R.A.F. to re-admit but all they offered was a taxi-flying job. But finally Pilot Bader was. taken back as a fighter. When his metal legs got bent in minor R.A.F. repairmen fixed him up.as well as his plane. Soon.he-had his own squadron. Japanese official circles arc main Pacific in war. would do that tain ing silence on the vast issues by invasion of- Thailand or cd .officials in Berlin said Sjcai the corpse of an German forces have reached the Oid- man was discovered yesterday Black Sea coast to the east and I in the bushes .near the sewer west of 'the city. Hungarian miii-jfall on.the .beyond ky saying that he had new phase. land no trace of the identity of the said that Prance's .relations 1 -4 lam ing snence on tne vast issues at oy invasion 01- maiiana or August mVPfl I L slake in the Far -East and'Reuters gy attack on Soviet troops in the broaricast to the French peo- JL11 I tii reported from Tokyo that the for- Iar Either in the -present a Proaacast_ to me 9f h _ _ _ _ J I 'I...' J_ Tl u_ L. 1 1 M Held In Clash At was Picnickers Melee CHARGES ANSWERED The repeated charges by the Ja- panese Press that Great Britain rules in AMERICAN COMMENT. In Senator 'f ermany August Royal Air Force made its big- gest raid on Germany to-day. A year ago when the Luftwaffe had just started large scale raids in the Battle of it seem- ed unlikely that the Royal Air Force would be dealing death- blows m daylight in the heart of Germany. But this morning six squadrons U.S. BASE WAGES BRING QUESTIONS PARLIAMENT July 'Cir- David Adams in the House- of Commons recently asked the Under-Secretary of State for the Colonies whether instructions had been given to Colonial Gov- ernors to encourage the payment of higher wages than those cur- rent in those areas of the -Amer- ican bases in the West Indies where the average wage was below a. reasonable living standard. Replying in the George Hall said that the policy of the United States authorities was to base the rates payable for locally engaged labour on those prevailing in the territory or local- ity for comparable work under similar conditions. That practice was being followed generally in the Colonies and in ac- cordance with it the rates were being determined- .by the United States representatives in consulta- tion with the Colonial authorities. Mr. Adams then asked if the answer meant that no encourage- ment was being given by the Col- onial Department to Colonial Gov- ernments to encourage the pay- tho se prevailing were on a subsistence or less than subsistence level. we were concerned replied Mr. that wages lower 'than the prevailing rates should not be paid. It is a question the Mr.-Riley'then asked if Mr. Hall was aware that there were no trade unions in the West Indies for of these and whether the policy of His 'Maj- esty's Government was to get Col- onial Governors to encourage the raising of the standard' rates for labour of this kind whenever it was possible to do Mr. Hall in reply but whore there are nn trade unions there arc wages ordinances in i Rockfort Gardens when a city became em- broiled with a picnic party from Gordon Town. The result is that one girl from Gordon Town is in hospital unconscious from a blow to the head with a and about a dozen per- sons have been placed under arrest on various mainly stone-th of Blenheims penetrated deep in the industrial heart of Germany and wVeaked havoc on two stations at Cologne. Both were attacked at point blank the same time and were left .burning. Fighter escorted the bombers to from Antwerp and others patrolled the coast in support. At about the same time Hamp- den bombers escorted by fighters carried put offensive operations. over Northern France and attack- ed railways near St. and power stations and shot down three Messerschmitts 'which tried to hinder them. American'fortress aircraft bombed an airdrome in the Netherlands and the port of Emden on the German coast These extensive attacks caused the Bri- tish twelve Blenheims and eight fighters. After escort to Antwerp was pro vided by a strong of long- range which included the twin-engined the bombers kept strict formation and flew oh alone to launch the of- fensive on Cologne. People who watched the British planes set out and return from the British side of the Channel saw nothing of the enemy fighters which this time last year hovering near the English coast. they saw the British planes fly out and in pertect formation completely unchallenged. __ MONDAY NIGHT'S ATTACKS. Were carried out last orderly conduct. The first intimation the po- lice had of the affair was when they got a rush message that there was a riot at Rockfort Gardens. When they they found a melee in full rage. From statements in the pos- session of the it appears that a party of town boys were encroaching on the country picnickers and trying to take away their refreshments and The Gordon. Town party resisted and the stone throwing started. In course of this violent affray Linette Clue of Gordon Town received a blow to the head which hit her uncon- and Rebecca Black of Gordon Town got a severe wound on the nose. Clue was admitted to hospital and up to last night she was still uncon- scious. Held on charges of disorder- ly conduct and stone throwing were Reginald Madden' of a Water Lane Sydney Flummer of a Barry Street ad- Spencer Coombs of a Water Lane Steadman Stepherison of a James Street Vernon of a Slip pock Road James Kelly of a Sheffield Road Charles CarralF of and America1 .had designs on 6t ranking Thafland. were once the e'd the I'haUla'rid Consuf General .committee reporters. -to-day in He. that any is definitely in the range pew- did not concern his country. The head of the Thailand dele- gation to settle the new Thalland- Indo frontier said Tha o me assistance if attacked. Meetings of the boundary .commission are due to begin in Saigon' next Monday. measures to strength- en the defences of Bucma were an- nounced today. The Burma De- fence Council had been reconstruc- ted .and given far powers than-it had in the past. Reliable diplomatic circles In Tokyo believed the British Ambas- Sir Robertxieslle in a visit to Foreign Minister Teijiro Toyoda in Tokyo yesterday plain- ly discussed the which might arise through any change in Thailand's status and riiight have also discussed the Rus- sian situation. Sir Robert's conver- sation lasted an hour and a half and it was considered certain he presented personally the message of Foreign Secretary Anthony.Eden who last week warned that Britain was vitally concerned over the safety Singapore. the United States Am- Mr. Joseph had seen Admiral Toyoda j on page Japan takes any further definite steps in the southern Pacific or if she should move against Russia in expresse doubt that Japan refrain from any further aggressive but added he had no information as what additional Japanese moves might be under considera- Senator Republican of North consistent critic of the Administration's foreign policy have a nat- ural antipathy to the Japanese- and it will not take nearly much to get us involved there as it would to. involve us across the Atlantic. I am hopeful they will not try to get us intb war all over the world by the backdoor route. That is what it would amount to if we became involved with -.Senator Nye expressed his belief the United States Government had .been appeasing and oiling m the past because Administra- tion leaders to use'all our available materials for helping Milk Lane and Samuel King of Albert Street Two Of the persons from Gordon Town were arrested on the charge of .disorderly namely Gerald Cousins and Shirley Harrison. Lord Forme r Viceroy Of Dies Aug. It- is with regret that the death is announced of Lord former Vice. roy of which occurred in London this afternoon.-1 He was 74 25 .years' dis- tinguished service in the Common- YT i crnor of Bomnay. night by American-built Havoc MadraSi Governor-General of Can- fighters against aerodromes m ada look the vice-Royal- northern France and Holland. t f India t .cdticai tirne in runaways- wcre Anglo-Indian affairs. Much credit bombed A one enemy aerodrome Government of India Bill 3 3rfiC was due to started which- was later bombed by another resulting in two more fires. Fires were also started at .one of the butch aerodromes attacked. An Air Ministry communique spite of bad weather a force ol Bomber Command air- craft last night attacked objectives at Reydt and Glodbach m west Germany. Koi- terdam locks wore also bombed. Aircraft of the Fighter Command Lord Willingdon visited Jamaica shortly before relinquished the j P fiitarked enemy aerodromes in and it is the duty of Francc nnri lhc low coun. Colonial Governors to sec that the rates are try during the niflht None of our on pace in during the administration of Sir Edward staying a short Early in February this Lorrl Willingdon paid a brief visit with Willingdon. or. their way back to England from South where he head of a Hrilish trade mission. Me had to leave the mission on ac- count of illness. Sale Of Motor Cars Will Be Restricted f Probably the first blow to fall following on the West Indies im- port restriction conference is an order which has gone forth to gar- ages restricting the sale of motor cars. Mr. F. E. V. Competent has declined so far to make a statement on the matter but it is known that all city gar- ages have been notified of the pro- posed the exact form of which will shortly be disclosed. territorial gains but to AW AEIWT BEFOBT uv.-vu to-what'was described industry and shipping wast i rnimrfe lowest common denomina-U of.defiance andI menace with Germany was defined by .Neutrals con- were their w IHV iho tonight .that 6a -lai-ge scale mg sand in tne area lor Duuaing plan- Purposes- Horrified by the sight in the this naked partly dis- foiled'the sell- figured by the predations of ants and the women rushed.to a report to the police. .Detective Office .was in- formed and Detective country had made requests for United States conunenir h Rfid Ar Command tbday or had threatened Thailand might all commercial re la- with military action. Military tions with He-'said such movements outside he relations might be terminated I I _ _ _. 1 K A the armistice convention could only be provisional. I ned The. French must know to orientate themselves T HT T i' Ii reconciled would I I W m j mr I J W n open up to their pictured the situation on the east- had photographs taken of the body. That- was how the Vi ern front as virtually unchanged The autopsy was later on .overnight. The midday commu- formed at the and from Government was guiding their jnique of the Soviet Information what it is learned it appears that Bureau indicated that Russian no indications of foul play were.- ______________________________seen. It is estimated the body man tide on the and'was that of .a man of about 65 or efforts. Petaln _ ...._.. tions with. Italy were also regu- lated by the armistice convention and his Government was establish- that cduntry. .without which European order could not be built up again. He announced the appointment of Admiral Darlan as- Minister for State and Empire which would give him contrr1 of the sea and air forces of France. I2-POINT PROGRAMME The Marshal announced also a tweive-point the ob- ject of which was he said to The first of these points was that all political -parties in unoccupied France are -to be dis- solved. Other points that all Ministers and State servants were to take the to the all those responsible for the de- feat France were to be and the economic system of France was to be.reorganised. The Marshal said he would like to recall to the great Ameri- can republic the reason why they need not fear a decline of French ideals. He said that French Par- liamentary Democracy had few things in common with the De- mocracy of he said. the love of freedom still lived in the French who were proud and strong although their democratic system Is THE tWELVE POINTS The twelve points made by Mar- shal Petain in his broadcast Activities- of all political parties have been suspended in unoccupied Parliamentary salaries and indemnities are abolished. Action will be taken against civil servants who are Free Masons. The Legion of Combatants remains the best instrument of na- tional resurrection in unoccupied FrancerTnis is still under govern- ment-control. on pace on pace 70 years of age. Constitution Governor Explains Why Suggestion For Two ouses w as LORD WILLINGDON. IN PRIZES FIRST PRIZE ecretary Of State N'AN' EFFORT TO away in connection with the suggestion which has been made in i the Press concerning absence of a specific reply from the Secretary of State to the Constitutional made by a Legislative Council Committee in 1939 subse- quently His Excellency the Governor has forwarded the following letter dated August to the Elected and Nominated Unofficial Members of the My attention has been invited to the which has appeared in the about the absence of a specific reply from the Secreta- ry of State to the constitutional proposals made by a Legislative Council Committee in 1939 and subsequently adopted in Legisla- tive Council in 1939. 2.'It may be of service to Hon- ourable Members if I recapitulate briefly the'recent history of this in an. e'lfort to clear away misapprehension. The chronology is of some im- portance. 3. On the llth August 1938 .on the motion of the Honourable Mem. ber for Trelawny a Resolution was passed in the Legislative Council relating to the Constitution and asking that the Royal Commission should have this subject included t The current Gleaner Football Contest is a banner one it's BIG In fact It is one of the grandest contests we've had. That's why you must take advantage of the opportunity it affords you. Many are the people who from day to day wish they could get .Among you perhaps are a leading But merely wishinr seldom gets us anywhere ttoo well do you know that. Success calls for action as well as am- bition. 4D. FOR EACH CROSS Fee 'and Government Tax The Gleaner's Missing Ball Competition provides the oppor- tunity for you to win a big cash prize of or many another -cash prize. That's an opportunity well worth grasping and it is within your for you have little to lose Only 4d for each cross inclusive of Government tax and if payment Is made in Bank Notes or Postal Order Instead of one Cross Is allowed free in every four crosses sent in. Remember you have little to lose and a' lot to wm. sn make up your mind and enter NOW. See Page 10. ENTRIES CLOSE ON 23RD AUGUST 1941. .On the 7th September 1938 the Secretary State's reply was communicated in the form of a circular letter from the Colonial Secretary's Office to all Elected Mernbers.' Inter alia it asked the Elected Members to prepare for consideration a full statement of views. On the 3rd January 1939 I re- minded Honourable Members in Council tnat a statement of their views was still availed. On the 28th February 1939 the Secretary of State wrote thai the On the 15Ui Legislative Council debated the Report ol the Select Committee-on the Constitu- tion and adopted it without a divi- sion.. The Report referred to was a majority advocating an elected House of Assembly and a nominated Legislative and signed by eleven elected members. Of these eleven members six signed a rider urging that Ihe House of Assembly should consist of twenty- eight members and not as in the main The remaining three elected members signed a mi- nority Report in favour of only one Legislative Council of forty members whom six would be elected. It will thus be spen that on question of size of the Legislative Assembly nine out of fourteen elec- ted members favoured a- of members. At the end of 1939 the Royal Commission submitted its Report to .the. Secretary of State and its recommendations iA-ere published in February. 1940 The recommendations under 7 Constitutional and Closer Union are of such importance in this con- nection that I annex a copy for the convenience of Honourable Members' refcmice. 4.' During 1940 the Secretary or State had thus before him a bcr of documents which included the Report of the Select question of sutfnige extension mul i tcc Or the Legislative Council the other cognate qucs- Reports of Legislative Council dc- tions would rct-c-vr hip jUtc.ition j bales on the Constitution and ori hul thai he wc.uln wisl. in awiiit Universal Suitrogc. and also re. the Report r ihr RnyM Commis- commendations bv various sion bcforp rraclvnp anv rloci indies and inciivirinals in -Tamaica. Honourable Members were in 1 discussc4 ed accordingly. on f   

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