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Winnipeg Free Press Newspaper Archive: July 01, 1963 - Page 1

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   Winnipeg Free Press (Newspaper) - July 1, 1963, Winnipeg, Manitoba                               TODAY'S' INDEX Classified .17 to Movies 7 Comics 8, 9 Radio, TV 6 Deaths !10 Sports 14 to IS Women 11 Winnipeg Free Press VOL. 70 NO. 5135 28 PAGES Price lOc WINNIPEG, MONDAY, JULY 1, 1963 Sun rises a.m. Moon rises p.m Sun sets p.m. Moon sets a.m. f Storm Kills Man Tossed 300 Feet By Spy Hill Tornado SPY HILL; sask. (CP) I One man was killed, an- other surprisingly escaped serious injury and farm- houses xand outbuildings were smashed Saturday night when! a tornado roared through northeast of here, 63 'who farmed of this com- 120 miiles northeast of Regina, was killed when the twis- ter cracked open his farmhouse, plucked him from the kitchen and tossed him 300 feet into a summerfallow Afield. RCMP said he died of a fracture. Bob Clark, 44, Smith's cou- sin and the oriiy other occupant of the farmhouse, also was picked up by the tornado and flung on the ground. He es- caped with bruises and lacera- tions. Another district farmer was injured slightly when the tor- nado struck his house. Alto- gether four fsirms were heavily damaged. Continued 1 Please See Page 4 FORECAST: SUNNY; 50 and 75 Four Manitobans Killed In Acdilents Four Mantoba residents hav Of Lundar Man were met violent death since the VT'i Twin Lakes, a beach near St of the threei-day Laurent holiday weekend. Holiday Death Toll: 97 Pope Paul Aims For Peace, Unity Pontiff Speaks In 8 Tongues As See Coronation By SANCHE DE GRAMONT VATICAN CITY (Special-NYHT) 7'opw Paul VI, 262nd heir to the throne of .cier, was crowned Sunday in St. _ o; Leiore a crowd estimated at a quarter "I" Giiiiioh. of the outdoor iun'aai. coronation, which was attended by representatives -of 82 nations and nine-international organizations, were the solemn pontifical high mass celebrated by the Pope and the multi-lingual speech he delivered. The speech had passages in Latin, Italian, French, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish and German ta mark the universality of the Roman Catholic Church. The Pope also said a few words in Russian, which were not part of his prepared text. Pope Paul, wno until his elec- tion June 21 was Giovanni Car- dinal Mpntini, Archbishop of Milan, stressed two points in all of the languages: His concern for the preservation of world peace, and his hope that the "separated brethren" (non-Catholic Christ- Please See POPE Page 2 SEA N-FORCE SHELVED Ban Is Urgent Mac, JFK Two Leaders Lpproach To Take rilgjb-Level Moscow Treaty Talk By HICHARD PURSER LONDON. (Staff) President Kennedy and Prime Minister Macrnil- lan agreed over the weekend on a joint approach to the nuclear test ban talks opening in Moscow July 15, but they failed to make any further prog- ress on the NATO multilateral seaborne missile force, and the project has been shelved for the time being. The communique issued Sun- day following President Ken- nedy's 22-hour visit to Mac- millan's country home did not spell out details of the brief their representatives, Aversll Harri- man and Lord Hailsham, will take to Moscow. It merely noted that a test ban treaty at this time was "most urgent" and "might lead on to progress in other directions." But the r ,i was along British-back .es, and it was that the untries will seek Jiact Union a perman- aaty banning all nuclear ests anywhere in the at- Dead are: 22, c? ,t670 USQII Highway; -SBC-'- 21, 48 bifciel; Harry Joseph Houston, 24, of 474 Sargent Avi- nue and Clarence Edward Lava- lee, 15, or St. Laurent. The fatality count started at 6 p.m. Friday and ends at mid- night Mon> lay. Last year's Do- minion Day accident toll in Manitoba was 10. With tho. homeward rush yet to come, liree of dead killed in higiway ac- cidents said the fourth' was drowned. Mr. Spjirrow was killed at 3 a.m. Sunday when the sports car in which lie was travelling rolled into a ditch missing a curve. The accident happened on Highway -4, two miles east of West Hawk Lake. RCMP said Mr. Sparrow was accompanied by John Alexander Scott, 22, sf Balmerton, Ont. 'Mr, Scott received undetermined juries and was reperfr? condition fa V-z PoHti. car was owned as Kr. .'Sparrow but they had not definitely determined who- was driving at the time. An inquest will open at 10 a.m. Monday at Falcon Lake with coroner Dr. William Bilynsky, of Whiternouth, presiding. Mr. Desjarlais and Mr. Hous- ton were killed when their half- ton truck was in a head-on col- lision with an panel truck near Warrem, Man., on Highway 6 about a.m. Saturday. BClilP said another occupant of .t'ne half-ton truck, Elwin about 20, of 722 Maryland Street, is in fair condition in Winnipeg General Hospital suf- fering from burns. The occupants of the panel trues, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Mili- St. Boniface Girl Killed In N. Dakota GRAFTON, North Dakota (AP) Carol Spender, 18, of 192% Berry Street, St. Boniface, .Man., died in a Grafton hospital Sunday night following a one-car accident others. which injured four One of the injured, Charlene MacLean, 16, of. 115 Rose Street, Winnipeg, was reported in ser- ious condition today. The others injured were the dead woman's husband, Roy Spender, 18; Pat- rick Mercer, of 227 Ferry Road, St. James, and the driver of the car, Edward Jermoluk, 98 De Bourmont Bay, St. Boniface, The car rolled over on a state road 14 miles south of Brayton Sunday night, uninjured. Coroner Dr. F. W. Evelyn, of Stonewall, Man., has ordered an inquest.- Clarence Lavalee drowned j about 10 p.m. Friday while swimming with his brothers at By THE CANADIAN PRESS Ninety-seven Canadians had met accidental death, most of them on roads' and in rivers and lakes, as the Dominion Day Holiday weekend entered its last day today. The road toll was 49 one fewer than the Canadian High- way Safety Council's" predic- tion of 50 traffic deaths for the three-day weekend. A Canadian Press from 6 p.m. Friday to 8 f.r-... cDT counted 44 a fire death and three other fatalities. Please See 97 DEAD Page 2 mosphere, underground, water, and in space. under- Please See MAC Page 2 Pocket Rift Gives K More Grief Romania Boycotts Summit As Economic Protest By KATHA5INE CLARK EAST BERIJN Nikita Khrushchev mustered those' satellite bosses he could for a summit cruise on the River Spree Sunday afternoon. Notably missing from the out- ing was Romania's Gheorghiu- Dej. The official reason for the gathering was the 70th birthday of East German leader Walter Ulbrieht. The .'leader sent a telegram of but failed to sti reasons for his absence. Earlier, Mr. called on Mr. Ulbrieht and presented him with an eight-seater blue Zil automobile, promising that the Zil firm would handle all complaints. Poland's Wladyslaw Gomulka and Bulgaria's Todor Zhivkov flew here only Sunday morning, and Mr. Gomulka returned to Warsaw Monday morning. Please See REDS Page 5 BANG! Assassin? Boy Just Laughs Pope Paul VI inclines his head receive the beehive crown from Alfredo Cardinal Ottaviani to climax Sunday's coronation at the Vatican. DEW Firm Answers Union CMiicial Boy Missing At Patricia Beach The RCMP Monday continued to search for an eight-year old Nairn Avenue boy who vanished Sunday in the Patricia Beach area. Unconfirmed reports Monday said the boy was 'floating on an inner-tube on Lake Winnipeg when he went missing. No further details were avail- able Monday. Patricia Beach is about 50 miles north of Winnipeg. esrson Home; All Well OTTAWA Min- ister Pearson returned home Sunday after a successful oper- ation Saturday for removal of an obstructed salivary gland from the right side of his 'neck. "The doctor says all is said an aide, quoting Dr. W. Gordon chief of sur- gery at Civic Hospital. "The prime minister feels very well. He's in good spirits." N.J; A spokesman for Federal Electric Corporation, in reply to a state- ment by William Ladyman, IBEW Vice-President, in the Winnipeg Free Press of June 29, has stated that Mr. Ladyman's comments concerning wage cuts on the DEW-Line are contrary to Mr. Ladjtman's knowledge of the situ- ation. On June 26, 1963, a message was sent from the Paramus head- quarters of Federal Electric to all DEW sites stating that sis a result of company discussions with the Canadian department of labor, wage rates and individual employment agreements will be continued. The message cancelled the pro- posed wage reduction caused by the competitive procurement un- der which the fiscal year 1964 contract was awarded to FEC. The spokesman pointed out that Ladyman is well aware of this message. The FEC said it has not. re- oil cruited "foreigners" to operate the DEW-Line, as "incorrectly by Mr. Ladyman in a Washington Post article on June WAS FAVORITE DRUGGED? Irish Probe Derby Scratch DUBLIN (AP) The men who run Irish racing called an emer- gency meeting today to investi- gate the great Relko mysteiry. The question: Was Relko, Eur- ope's best three-year-old colt, incapacitated by drugging to produce his withdrawal just be- fore the start of Saturday's Irish Derby. Officials of the Curraugh race track at first blamed Relko's sudden lameness to natural auses. But newspaper commentators, pointing to similarities with drugging on British tracks, were inclined to suspect the colt was got at to save the bookies a massive beating. The French-owned Relko, the ll-to-8 favorite, looked fine in the paddock and appeared a virutal certainly to repeat Ms easy Epsom Derby success. Yves St. Martin, champion French jockey wlio was to have ridden Relko, said the horse be- gan to move badly on the way to the starting gate. "He is gone'on the off right Those who backed Relko on the hind St. Martin said. "Relko was going perfectly until we reached the St. Martin said. "Then suddenly he seized up. He could hardly even walk, and certainly would not even have trotted. I knew it was out of the question for him to run." The announcement that Relko was withdrawn came seconds before the race. Bit bettors lost thousands in bets placed before the race day. LOOKING FOR A TENT? This want ad under Mis- cellaneous Articles for Sale 9x12 TOURIST TENT. GOOD condition. Phone 222-3129. is among the hundreds of bar- gains in today's classified sec- tion. No matter what you need shop and save in Fi-eti Press want ads. course had their money re- turned. And under Irish rules, those who backed Ragusa, the winner, had their winnings cut by half because the withdrawal left no time to set up more re- alistic odds. Some said Relko's symptoms were suspiciously like those pro- duced by Curare, the poisoned arrow drug. Curare needs only a pin prick or even a spray to take effect. It is thus ideal for a dope gang who may have only seconds to get at a horse as it is paraded to the post. Others suggested Relko had some mysterious kidney ail- ment. Within a few hours Relko was fit again. Sunday morning he was out for exercise and-he will be returned to France Stewards of [he Irish Turf promised an announcement after their meeting, though the full test results may be delayed for days. 28. All recruiting in Canada is done in conjunction with the Canadian National Employment Service. In the U.S., Federal Electric Cor- poration maintains its own re- cruiting offices. Please See DEW Page 2 Workers Leave North By MILT MacPHAIL The DEW (Distant Early Warn- ing) radar line, key network in North American air defence, is reported to be reeling under a shortage of operating staff fol- lowing a series of firings and walkouts of civilian workers. Another 25 men flew into Win- nipeg Sunday, bringing to 86 the number of workers who have left the northern sites since Friday. They said more would be follow- ing on flights Monday, but this could not be confirmed by Trans- Air, which services the DEW line on charter from Federal liiectric Corporation, operator of the line.- "Any information on DEW line flights must come from Fed- eral a TransAir spokesman said. Federal Elec- tric, with headquarters in- Paramus, N.J. and its Canadian base in Winnipeg, refused Sun- day to comment on the situation. Some workers who left the FOREST ROW, England bang sounded in the bushes. President Kennedy sat bolt upright'in the back seat .of his car. From one side of the road in front of this village's Church of Our Lady of the Forest, a secret service man rushed to the bushes. He peered inside with two uniformed British policemen at his: shoulder. Inside the bushes, wearing a black cowboy hat. Jr..- in 1 Site-ret service man did a. saw burn and said: "Pretty tough on us, Bus- ter." Little Hugh grinned and re- loaded his cap pistol. This little drama took place just across the road from the tiny Roman Catholic" church where I'ennedy attended mass Sunday morning. Kennedy drove here from Birch Grove House; ..Prime Minister Macmillan's home at Chelwood Gate, ZVi miles away. The .pistol :_CK place as leaving tap -K before, he jumped but, walked up the road to the waiting crowd, shook hands with several women and chil- dren and thanked them for giving him such a nice greet- ing- Back in the bushes, Hugh fired his cap pistol again. Chinese Won't EndTalk By VICTOR ZORZA LONDON The Guard- ian) The Chinese leadership Sunday confirmed its intention to send a delegation to Moscow jn week to discuss dif- ferences with Russia. A Peking statement said the delegation would go as arranged "in spite of the actions" the So- viet leaders have taken "to wor- sen further the relations" be- tween the two parties and coun- tries. (A report from Peking iMonday said an advance party of inter- preting and minor officials bad already left by air for Moscow.) The ringing affirmation that the Chinese will go to.' Moscow when taken together with a Pe-> king accusatiofi-oa Saturday that Russia was trying to prevent the meeting, like an attempt to shift the bfame to Russia there is no meeting aft- OTNA Britain, Soviets Fail To Agree On Laos LONDON British government today disclosed the collapse of its efforts with the Soviet Union to consolidate the shaky international peace settle- ment in Laos. The British threw the whole problem of its disagreements with the Russians back to the countries that signed tho 14-na- tion peace settlement of Laos in Geneva last year. Britain and the'Soviet Union are co-chairmen of the Laotian peace, setup and in that capac- ity have had a special respon- sibility to see that terms of the settlement are fulfilled. Announcing the development at a press conference, the for- eign office said Foreign Secre- tary Lord Home wrote to Soviel Foreign Minister Andrei Grom- yko June 27 expressing regret that they had been unable to agree. "Since we do not seem able to reach agreement, I suggest that the best thing is for us to submit the whole question to the judgment of the signatories of the Geneva agreement and of public Home wrote. The documents in question were transmitted to all the in- terested countries today. Home's action followed the receipt of a message from Gromyko June 25 in which the Russian proposed that a Brit- ish-Soviet message be sent to all the signatory states.' Gromyko's message would have laid most of the blame for the collapse of the Laotian peace efforts on the Laotian rightists, the United States and members of the eight nation Southeast Asian Treaty Organ- ization. Tot Found In Car Lot A baby boy believed to be be- :ween five and eight months old vas abandoned on a Winnipeg used car lot Sunday' night. City police, seeking to identify he child and trace his parents, urge anyone with information on the case to contact them im- mediatetly at WH 2-8231. The baby, described by police as possibly Indian or Metis, was ound at p.m. Sunday lying Between two trucks "on a used DEW line said they were fired car lot at 235 Main Street. after being told by Federal they were surplus to '.he company's requirements. Others said they quit rather than accept pay cuts which they claimed Co were The child was wrapped in three blankets and was dressed in a three-piece matching blue knit- ted outfit. Employees of the car lot called police who turned the baby over Please See WORKERS Page 2 I to the Children's Aid Society. Call-Girl Rumors Denied LONDON (AP) V Tbant, secretary-general of 'the United Nations, denied through an aide Sunday night that a call girl ring is operating in the UN sec- retariat. His spokesman stated: "The secretary-general called for a report and received it about four days ago. "Rumors of a call girl ring being operated are unfounded as far as the secretariat is con- cerned. "He cannot speak for the many delegations to the United Nations." The spokesman added that the delegations hold parties out- side the control of the secre- tariat. U Thant himself declined comment both in New York and London on reports that a call girl ring is operating with UN diplomats as clientele. Please See DENIAL Page 4 JFK Turns To Italy BELLAGIC, Italy (AP) President Kennedy arrived? in this Alpine foothill resort Sun- day for a night of secluded rest before flying on to Rome for meetings with leaders of Italy's shaky new government' and the Roman Catholic world's new pope, Paul VI. A minimum, of fanfare accoai- paisied Kennedy's arrival for a three-day 'visit to Italy, the fourth nation on his current Eu- ropean tour. There were no speeches at Milan's Malpensa Airport after a flight'from Brit- ain, but. president waved to a crowd of cheer- ing Italians and told them' happily, in Italian .anS: English: grazie thank you, thank you." He then boarded a helicopter and flew to this resort on the side of Lake Como. Ahead of him, in the next three days, were talks in Rome with Premier Giovanni; Leone and President Antonio Segni of [taly and a historic--meeting Tuesday of the Roman Catholic U.S. president with tha Pope. also visit NATO's southern European headquarters in Naples before flying back to the United States Wednesday. Kennedy's Mac- millan Saturday nighti and Sun- day morning resulted in agree- ment on the urgency of a nu- clear test-ban pact with the So- viet Union, hopefully to about at the U.S.-British-Soviet test-ban talks opening in Mos- cow July 15. However Macmillan refused to commit Britain to a nuclear fleet for' NATO, agreeicg only on further studies with other in- terested allies on the U.S. plan for a mixed-crews fleet of 25 Polaris missile equipped sur- face ships. The proposed NATO fleet also will be a topic of Kennedy's dis- cussions with Italian leaders, but little is expected to come from the talks because Leone's minority isr given small chance of lasting much beyond Kennedy's visit. Please See KENNEDY Page 5   

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