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Winnipeg Free Press Newspaper Archive: May 1, 1945 - Page 1

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   Winnipeg Free Press (Newspaper) - May 1, 1945, Winnipeg, Manitoba                             FINAL EDITION VOL. PAGES WINNIPEG, TUEfSDAY. MAY .1, 1945 SHOWERS Moon rises il'.OOr.lncori'sets .8.45. The bald head of former dictator, Bemto Mussolini, rests in death on the bod> Milan's Piazza'Loretto, under guard of Italian partisans. Mussolini and Clara wei< leaders near Como and the bodies brought to Milan. Secret And Ignominious Burial Marks End Of Fascist Tyrant Milan May 1 Mussolini arid-his. mistress, ...Clara secretly in unmarked graves in the potters' field of the, Maggipre cemetery, late was revealed. Former Fascist party Secretary.Achme who was executed yesterday was interred a short distance away in the same ptftof ground. The only witnesses to the-igno minious burials were 15 mem- s Last Hours Of Horror A HOLIDAY "hers of the cemetery staff who sworn to secrecy to' pre vent mobs from learning the graves' location. The three bodies were in rough unpainted pine coffins, the tops of -which were screwed on. A military chaplain offered a brief Catholic benediction. An Italian Red Cross truck had transported the three bodies .from the morgue to the burial site. Vittorio Vertova, cemetery direc- tor, said the brain had been removed from Mussolini's body and crimin- ologists were examining it. Kepair Undertakers 'did their best to re- pair the damage done Mussolini's corpse. They built up his face so that it had regained some of. its old-time arrogance. A routine autopsy was performed yesterday And his body was sewed together roughly. Fittingly the body of the sawdust Caesar rested on sawdust. His blood-soaked uniform was tossed on top of him. In casket 165, still next to him, the body of Clara Petacci, covered by the crimson-stained skirt and white which she had died. Her clothes had been partly torn off while her body and Mus- solini's were hanging, heads down, from the rafters of a burned-out .gasoline station. Graziani Helcl By Allies The Milan mob stormed Vittore prison, howling for the life of Marshal Rudolfo Graziani. Fascist minister of war and commander of the Italian Fascist army still resist- ing in North Italy. However, Partisans turned Grazi- ani over to Cot Norman Fiske; of Portland. Ore. of the Allied com- mission. The" marshal was taken to Fourth, corps headquarters out- side Milan to be held as a war CrFiske also accepted the surrender of 150 to 200 SS troops, including their general, who had been bar- v BURIAL Continued on Page 4. Column 5 By JAMES E- KOPEE May vountf mistress SUC-LIL i-m- _ locked "n a room of' a mountainside vUla here; overlooking Lake Como. The details of how Mussolini and Clara Petacci died side by side were fold to me by partisan eyewitnesses. After their people's tribunal trial, the couple were brought to this tiny hamlet. That was at 2 a.m., Satur- day There they remained until 4 p.rru disturbed only by the serving of -meals. When a guard entered the room Saturday afternoon, 'Mussolini was fully dressed and wearing a hat. Clara was in bed, wearing a silk must go away the guard told them. Clara began to dress slowly and the guards told her to hurry. Mussolini seemed very depressed. cnr. .The guards drove the couple 500 yards in an auto then made them walk 'another 500 yards. "We've come to liberate you, one guard told Mussolini. Il'Duce seemed to believe it. and for the first "lime he smiled. Rendering Justice -Then a.Partisan .proclaimed: "By order of the general command of comrades of volunteers, I am charged with rendering justice for the Italian Clare threw herself across Musso- lini's '.chest as a shield and cried hysterically, "you shouldnt kill CLARA PETACCI, who was- executed with Benito Mussolini ri Milan. May Cut Suger Ottawa, May Possibility of cutting the Canadian sugar ration to help meet the pressing needs of liberated Europe is under discussion and review by the government, of- ficials of -the wartime- prices and rade board said here today. The United States sugar ration was cut 25 per'cent last night and tighter rationing of other foodstuffs ,vas hinted. we'll kill you 'the Partisan said. The couple were pulled apart and ane Partisan fired several pistol L'AST HOURS Continued on Page B Manitoba Loan Subscriptions Pass Third Of Their Objective Manitoba' has raised more; than How Totals Stand Official provincial minimum objective Total to date ooo Dominion Dominion r tizens -Wpg. Citizens Concerns .Total, it- 500 000 mm Uther.than Gtr. Provincial dite'' Siilfi'needed' 'Percentage of official minimum provwcial. objective of cent.' v Gtr. Wpg. Citizens 'Objective Previous total Since reported ._4-96_8 -Total to j3-672 Bjjyers still needed Wpg! Citizens 3.081 Total 3.049 Manitoba' has raised more; than one-third of its objective in the 8th Canadian Victory Loan, with eight of the 18 canvassing :.days gone, officials of the national war finance committee, Manitoba divi- sion, "stated Tuesday.'Mhe provin- cial total- stands at. Victory bond salesmen: are con- teliding with muddy roads owing to--recent- rain', Ferguson, of Mobseh'orh, lias'solved the prbDlem. by using bis. tractor. He: gets- few-miles up the highway by automobile, ,then transfers to his Fordson, wh'ich has to through several feet of water at the eveningNhe goes back tu_-fht highway, parks ,1ns tractor and is driven home by1- his -arife r j i To enable more Winnipeg chil- dren to take part in the Bonds- from-the-Blue contest, aircraft silhouette cards will be enclosed in delivery parcels sent-out by the T Eaton company, Tuesday, nesday and Thursday, while addi- tional' 'cards will ,be distributed with bread deliveries. Thursday, by Canada Bread company (lim- ited; Bryce Bakeries limited, and ,VICTORY LOAN .4 Ilsley Reveals V-E Day Plans Ottawa, May 1. J. L. Ilsley as acting prime minister, said in a statement late yesterday that an official announcement will be made on behalf of the Canadian government .when hostilities in to follow the announcement' with two first declar- ing the following Sunday to be, a day of solemn thanksgiving and remembrance, and the second de- claring the day following 'the an- nouncement to be a public holiday. He added: "It is, of course, understood that these latter arrangements are ten- tative only and may have to be altered in stances." Strike Repercussions Washington, Secretary of May 1 Interior President' Truman today that he Qv was prepared to take over strike- it bound Pennsylvania hard coi' mines. ____________ TEMPERATURE READINGS Low during the niglit 7.30 a.m., May 1 10.30 a.m., May 1 1.30 p.m., May 1......---- -HO This day last year London, May 1. Minister Chur chill hinted today, .that announcement of peace m come before Satin-day, but told a packed house of commons that he had no statement at come oeiore fcouse-as CountFolke Bernadotte conferred in StocWiolnvvitb. of state in the Swc dish foreign office, after flying, from Copenhagen. was no signs that .the count had made a contact with Allied representatives in Stock- holm, but such contact. most likely would be. established through the Swedish foreign office. (A Reuters news agency Stock- holm despatch, however, said the Swedish radio reported that Count Bernadotte brought with him a new capitulation offer from Himm- ler.) (Reuters said later, however, that 10 Swedish foreign office denied this.) Replying to a member's question, Mr. Churchill declared: "I have no special statement to make on the war position in Europe except that it is definitely more satisfactory than it was al this time five years ago." Mr. Churchill said that infor- mation of exceptional importance "reaches the government during the sittings of the house this week it might he would make a brief announcement. V-E Day Arrangements "With regard to the condition and requisition which would occur U.S, Wins Against Russia In Test Of Power At Frisco By BRUCE HUTCHISON San Francisco, Calif., May United Nations conference ran headlong -yesterday into the one thing which above all it wanted to ,1 TT.-J.-J Tl-in TTmfori jLtti V CiO J- T J..I.J1 uw a test of power between the United States and Russia. won but the cost of its victory by an overwhelming vote of the conference remains seen. Certainly this open breach, and a personal dispute Molotov problems of Poland and Argentina. Briefly, the United States, making good its pledge to all Latin America, admission to the Argentina, only a few weeks ago it was offi cially denouncing as Fascist and] a HIIU peoples of our motherland are cele- tool of the Axis powers. Russia great patriotic war." countered by quoting these Amen- He hailed the vie can charges against Argentina, op- declaring that posing its admission without fur- hoisted the banner of victory over tier .consideration and insisting tne German capital. He had an- that if'Argentina was to be ad- in another order that the CONFERENCE. Continued 7. Column 2 Canadians Split On Argentine By BRUCE HUTCHISON. San May 1. Yjster- iimj nave m v day's open split in the United Na- light of circum- conference found the British JUIJS iations strongly divided in opinion oday and demonstrated ai.ew tne collapse of 'the' single voice theory. Britain was represented as well satisfied with the. conference vote. (BUP) New Zealand voted with Russia to secretary ui jjnunu- Harold L postpone the .Argentine question. Ickes said after a conference with Australia took the extraordinary [Ction last night.of announcing that had voted with the Americans Today it was learned directly that the Canadian delegation was split when Mr. King voted against Russia in favor of admitting the Argentine. The facts of this split will be re- vealed to the Canadian public dur- ing the next few weeks.________ THANKSGIVING SERVICE IS SET Plans for the service of Thanksgiving, to be held on the grounds 01 the legislative build- ing when word of final victory in Europe has been received, were completed at the city hall Monday afternoon. A proclamation, issued by -Hon. W. J. Major, chairman of the citizens' committee, and Mayor 'Garnet Coulter, outlines the possible limes' of the ser- If the news of the victory in Winnipeg' be-- tween 6 p.m. and 9 a.m., the service will be held at 11 a.m.; if between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m.. te service will be at 3 p.m.. end if'between 1 p.m. and 6 p.m., the service will be at. 8 p.m. Mr Justice Major will pre- side and a -tribute to the glori- ous dead will be paid by Arch- bishop L. Ralph Sherman. Then will follow one minute's silence, after which Dr. W. C. Graham will lead in a prayer of praise and thanksgiving. Scripture, readin" will be given by Rabbi Solomon Frank.' Short addresses will be given by Honi R. F. Mc- Williams. lieutenant governor: Hon. Stuast Garson, premier, Mnyor Coulter. If it should rain, the service will be held in the civic audi- torium. tween Messrs. Stettinius on a matter of fact, left the smaller nations appalled and the Russians obviously haunted anew by-their old fear of a world united against them But the American delegation seem- ed strangely unaware of the damage created by this schism, saying onl" that the democratic process, by convention vote, had- triumphed, that the-, conference had achieved real democracy. Yesterday's almost unbelievable _......______ situation centred around the twin oj Fascism by the United Nations. Jin Jubilant On May Day Moscow, May 1. Stalin marked the most May Day in the history of Soviet Russia today of' the day, proclaiming the imminent end of Hitler's Germany and vowing the destruction were to be made this week or_at any time..... country is celebrating May j _ tne international holiday of the working said his order, sfsa. -M- PCOplCS UJ- Ulll brating May Day under conditions of a victorious termination of a He hailed the victory in Berlin, declaring that Soviet troops nad lUOUIlUCU 111 eULlvjmv-i l Soviet flag flew over Hitler's.reich- "Germany JS" completely isolated and stands alone, not to count faci- ally, he said. Apparently in reference to the Heinrich Himmler peace offer to Britain and the United States, but not to Russia, Marshal Stalin said, "in searching for a way put of their hopeless plight. U.e Hitlerite ad- venturers resort to all kinds 01 tricks down to flirting with the Allies' in an effort to cause dissen- sion in the Allied camps. "These knavish tricks of the Hitlerites are doomed to utter fail- ure. They can only accelerate the disintegration of German troops. Marshal Stalin said that in three to four months the Russians had killed about l.rod.OOO German troops, captured and de- stroyed C.OUO German planes, tanks and cannon. "This doubtless means the end of tory is being occupied by us and our Marsha' Stalin's order "The industry remaining in her bands cannot supply the German armies sufficiently. German man- power reserves are exhausted. Ger- many is isolated and alone except Stalin said Nazi propa- ganda was trying-to intimidate the Germans by saying that the Alhes would exterminate all Germans. Fascism To Be Exterminated "This is not in our said the proclamation. "The Allies will MOSCOW Continued on Page 7. Column G Berlin Nazis In Last Gasp JTair-fSrcI e iiiitii the German capital battle for unfolded. Soviet troops were the Tiergarten. core of tne ditch German defence, and in on that ditcn oerjuBii fortress was getting low on water. food and ammunition fighting has been trans- Red Star, Soviet army newspaper "The Nazis are adopting the most desperate efforts to hold the las, defence. re- .LJOZclia "i- ported German officers draped themselves over their machine- after wrapping themselves m ns after wrapping as tenants facing ,zi banners arJ pumped bullets advice H. ito their own Bodies.- an of the.speci Soviet units which captured, the Reichstag'and the .interior_mims- N into into the control: the this sector- seemed imminent. the Morava. river valley BULLETINS Ottawa, May 1. was learned reliably today that Hon. J. L. Ilsley. acting prime minis- ter, may give a cabinet meet- ing this afternoon a report on the status of Nazi peace feelers. "Ottawa, 'May 1. Mitchell said today it was "probable" that call-ups for compulsory military service would end with the proclama- tion of V-E-.day---- San Francisco, May i (BUP) foreign commissar -V. M. Molotov- is expected to re- turn shortly to Moscow, it was learned today, but the decision was attributed to the imminent end of the European war rather than to conference disputes. London, May 1. (CP) Cap- ture of the Baltic port of Stral- sund, 40 miles from Rostock, was announced tonight by Mar- shal Stalin. Paris, May 1 Second army columns, break- ing out of the Elbe river bridge- head, outflanked the great port of Hamburg today and raced northward for the Baltic sea in a blazing bid to isolate Denmark from Hitler's dying-reich. Rome, May 1 (AP) Marshal Rodolfo Graziani and Lt.-Gen. Pemsel, German chief of-staff oj. the Ligsrian army, announced tonight the surrender of the Fascist Ligurian army and urged all the enemy troops to lay down their arms. Stockholm, May 1. Advices from Copenhagen said tonight that Danish police in full uniform were again patrolling the streets of several towns in Denmark after the Germans withdrew from the towns with- out incident. Rome, May 1 (BUP) Van- guards of the British Eighth army have crossed the Izonzo river in northeastern Italy and made contact with Marshal Tito's -Yugoslav forces m the Mongalcone area, it was an- nounced today. HAPPY PAY News To Come From Churchill a radio broadcast. An official announcement said that on the evening of the day the news is broadcast..King George will speak to the Empire over the radio of all denominations will and church bells of arrangements have been prepared, and will be issued tonight in a jme office he said. The implication that peace might come before the house rises for the week on Friday evening was the nearest to a prediction that Mr. Ch.irchill permitted himself. "Of he said. "I shall make no statement here that is not in accord with the statement which will be made by our ex- Slaining such announcements would e made only after consulting mili- tary commanders in different theatres. The prime minister said he did not consider that the information in "a major message" reaching the government should be withheld "until the exact occupation of all the particular zones was achieved. The movement of the troops and the surrender of enemy troops may both take appreciable period of. time." "Good news will not be delayed, he said, in answer to Lady Astor's question whether, if peace news came while the house was ad- journed, he would hold it 'until commons again sat, or would re- lease it through the BBC. The prime minister indicated a peace announcement not only might precede final surrenders, but that such surrenders might, not be worth an additional announcement. The fact that he.made no mention of Himmler's first surrender offer to Britain and the United Stales, or CHURCHILL Continued on Pace 6, Column 1 Count Confirms Meeting Himmler London, May 1. Folke Bernadotte, Swedish emis- sary reported lo be negotiating with Nazi leaders for Germany's surrender, confirmed today that he had conferred with Himmler 10 days ago. Bernadotte and a foreign office spokesman told a press conference that his last meeting with Himmler was held at Luebeck, in northern Germany. Burnadollc carried no reply from Himmler on his return to Stock- holm, the spokesman said. Bernadotte partially lifted the secrecy covering his recent activi- ties during a press conference late today in the Swedish foreign office in Stockholm. He refused to give details of any of his discussions with Himmler, news of the end nostiiiues IH and the foreign office Europe is made public, it will De pokesman emphasized that no new- done by Prime Minister Churchill in "from Himmler had been trans- r S til fill VtlUU from Himmler had been trans- to the Allies through the government today which did not preclude Bernadotte's com- with the Allied Immediate Bernadotte word on the persistent trated "fire came from the Tier- in earten apparently being supplied from a great fortress underground Special squadrons of Soviet soldiers stormed German positions frequently in gory encounters in the subways, which evidently have some connection with tne fortress beneath the Tiergarten. 'Dozens of suicides wen- Tenants Stand Firm In Moving Day Spats While moving day was than expected, police were out on several occasions, T eviction took the 01 AIU n. B. Scott, chair- f the .special committee on _c_t_____3 G 5 pc v "fused to. budge, the On the whole, however; moving the day-was kept comparatively, under from taking possession. told, police that Hutka lad at- tempted to force his way into the house by breaking, open the coat chute, desired because those with 25t wen marked Mr. Wills. It is also bis daughter's second anniversary. Shortly before noon e ____ .ex- n street. whd; prevented F. owner ol thehouse, Asked to lay by It. a he he de- 25th wedding to your anniversary, re- "V' where another tenant advice of Aid. Scott and Could' Not Be located Aid. Scott could not be for comment Tuesday mo_. None of tho other aldermen were at the city hall, either. Many people were moving, how. ever, without trouble, for a chccK MOVING DAY Continued on Page 7. Column e   

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