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   Winnipeg Free Press (Newspaper) - February 27, 1919, Winnipeg, Manitoba                                TODAY'S WEATHER FAIR; VERY COLD. Temperatures Maximum. 14.3. Minimum, 30.3. FAIRLY SATISFACTORY While the delegation that went to Ottawa on tlio vocational training trouble did not aain all points desired, n certain amount of success ia re- ported. Fun 7.1fl nni.: 65 p.m. Moon rises 5.29 a.m.: lets 37 p.m. WINNIPEG, THURSDAY, FEBRFAKY 27, 1919. MORNING EDITION 20 PAGES. r NO. 120-I-. n] Exigencies Empha sized in Debate on Address From Throne HNANCE PROBLEMS AHEAD Potion of "Separated Brethren- Defended by Hon. J. A. Calder- Public Works Programme Fcb Will Create Ministry of REPUBLICANS STILL Ways and lommumca ions rt OPPOSED TO LEAGUE o xv ar, and at- t-rnphasls In debate mi the address! London, Fcb. the house of commons today, in introducing a bill to establish a ministry of ways and communications, Edward Stiorlt, sec- retary for home affairs, said that hitherto there had been no co-ordina- tion between the various means of transport, and transport had depend- ed largely upon private efforts. It was quite impossible, he said, to revert to pre-war it was essential that there should be control and co-ordination. The new ministry, under the bill, would over control of railways, tramways, canals, waterways, road, and, finally.'jiowcr. Il would maintain the control over the railways which was exercised dur- ing the war, and might such changes as it thought necessary. Any changes, however, would require the sanction of ihe house. The bill was given ils first reading. Wilson Declares Society of Nations Will Fall Without Support of U.S. SMALL NATIONS NEED AID President Discusses Constitution With Members of Congressional Foreign Relations Committee Appalling Narrative of Mutilation of Captives as Result of Bolshevik Fury to, resumed h'the houso thin afternoon. For nn half, Hon. -I- A- Calder. Immigration, and chalr- rcp.itii.xtlon committee, and tho xvay In o of the of problems handled. any made i'hlch they had been 'it waj the tirht hpecch ot ,rrth which Mr L'aURr has house since ho Joined tho errrrer.t, for last session -such ti aj he mado were brief. iu tin-' necessity of mwtlnK the problem .'n In.poitant in a, In any other country. 'ijecon-itnictlon meant a national nd- Claims of Armenia Set Constitution for International Labor Bureau Ready Today s. adoption of lusher iik-. il.s tf ci ufi that would i-arls. Feb. at D'Oraaj The their today allied reprc- nioellns Jt the discussed the for incas- hue an exer-ln-, Qual to con- allotlns tq commissions lor consltler- HL> u-fe-ied, mcl- atlon of 'frontier iiucstlnns to the Mi iff cle enemy state.s. accordln constituency, no doubt as to 'CJ1.41I-. an to b-J Jor.e alunit It from a xvcstoin tla-ro was 'iMcr'm.idu reference lioiition of the ".-eparatPd 1 d that he was, nffccuns to an official a mem- announcement this The xxoik The conditions under xvhlch UelRlan claims and the problems thereot shall be considered, xveie laid down. The representatives ot tlie stipieme war council at Veisallies, the nnnounce- ._ ___ mcnt adda, reported the councils con- Ubeiala'clusioni as to the eatabllshment of an intermediate zone in Transylvania betxvten tho Roumanian and Hungar- ian tioopa and the conclusions wci-e adopted by the confeience. The claims of Armenia xvere set forth by M. Ahrotmian and Ntibar I'asha. Plans for Labor Bureau Ready Friday The peace conlerence commls-.sion on Intel national labor legislation a result cl the speeding up t gramme It has been lollowlne. ex- pects to complete the constitution loi an International labor bureau bj Friday. The conclusions reached b> the commission will then be read} for presentation to the next plenaiy session ot the peace conference. t5bme knotty pioblems have been encountered by the commission and thcie haxe been numeious conlllcttns views to haimonize. but these diffi- culties' havo been overcome and the Hrttlsh -proposals" "as a'whole mive been accepted. Tliere still remains FOine mattcis more or less extraneous housint; and hlchw.iys. tne constitution, such as tho iiues- tlicieby prnx-lded. he ar-ttiOn of Immigration, but these xvlll tco. Hie Union soviriim.-r.t on tho tlu> btllexed they til done the right thing. V.naneial Difficulties to Be Faced. Hon. Kran'.i farxell Indicated some fMtcwl illfl.culty ahead of the IK- estimated that ail- Tcul' recelpti fnun excise. o-.ir.c-s frollts and Income tax. would teal Further ordln.uy alinlrtatratiun of the country rit be CAP.led on with less CO 000 a xeor. wa.i the additional ?100.- to come Irum" Mr. Cnrvcll Eiptessln? A personal xlt-xv. ho tlie incon-.e tax exemption bhouM be reilucud. "No doubt." Cantll ailJcd. "the Income tax can Le Incrfiseil and xvlll be increased. outlined the eminent pro- In relied to public could than Washington, Feib. 2ii. President Wilson told members of the congres- sional foreign relations committee to- night that unless the United States i-tuoied the league of nations, the league would fall and chaos and tur- moil bejoitd description would result in Kurope. Views of Keptiullcnn momberb opposing the league's con- Uitutlon a.s imported tothe peace con- ference apparently xx-erc not changed by the conference. The president xva.s said to havo stated that It xx a.s necessary that the United States stand to the .support >f the theJuffo-Slnvs Poland and other weak and struirglms peoples made free ns a. result of the wa r. :usslun of the constitution as presented to tho peace conference xva.s said to have been (lulto treneral. and tho president was questioned closely, especially by Senator Drandages, of Connecticut Republican leader and Senator Kuo.x, of PennsyN vnnliu former secretarv of state, took verv 1't'le pirt Was Britain's Draft Constitution. The piesldent was said to have told the senators and lepresentatlves that the league constitution adopted was proposed by Great Britain but 1 Copenhagen, Feb. 20 (Can- adian Press despatch from Reut- appalling narrative of inhuman crime is revealed in the official report of the Estlioninn authorities on Bolshevist atrocities committed in Esthonia, i-specially Wcscnbcrg and Dorpal. The graves of those murdered al Wcsenburg were, opened an Fcb. 17, in the presence of llie town governor. Skulls were shattered, bodies hayonetled and even eviscer- ated. An eyewitness of llie ex- ecution, who escaped, described the terrible scene when the victims were placed on the edge of the graves and shot indiscriminately, trampled into the graves and finish- ed with the butts of rifles. The vicinity of the graves wcie littered lorn clothing, brains, frag- ments of sfyulls and hair, while the grass was covered, with congealed blood. Similar bloodthirstiness was evinced al Dorpat, where the murdered victims were dropped into the river through holes in the ice. Recovered bodies revealed many arms and legs broken and one with the eyes put out. The prisoners captured were robbed of dallies and valuables, put into a cellar and filled with hatchets and bombs. Examina- tion of the cellar showed bodies piled up Illicitly in unnatural posi- tions. The walls were splashed with blood. Bolshevist fury also raged against the peasantry, many of whom were mutilated and murdered. Thirty women mere al Narva by stones being lied around their and being thrown into the river. I Advisability of Forbidding Tariff Wars Between Nations RECONSTRUCTION PROBLEM IT'S COLD, BUT JUST LOOK AT Thermometer Hovered Around 30 Mark Here While in Sas- katchewan City It Waj 49 With a wind blowing from llftecn to twenty miles an hour und sweep- ing acroaH irom llie noitli- w e.st, when the thei monn'ter was ranging from anything between thirtj aud twenty-live liclovv, it's no wonder- fol'u whose business compelled So lie abroad and was I remembeiiMl that winter Is still with not the one'draxvn by Oeneral Smuts, thouah the mild d.i.xs of. last wceU one of the British authorities on tho i miu-ht have the feeling lensue proposal. Drafts presented by l they_ xvci e soon U> rest the United States, France .md Italy........ were rejected. GREET CLMCEnU Premier Able to Leave House Assailant's Mental Responsibility Examined Supreme Economic Council May Be Charged With Control and Allocation of Supplies In re- sued, xvoulil mnterliiKy (luclnc unemplojiiient. Says Pork Baronj Treated Too Kindly (in the tpi'oaitiun side of t'le tl.e onlv spiMker xvas .Mr. Sinclair, of Uujsiioro. Mr. Sinclair stroncly cii- ticisi-d tlie goxt-rnmeiit for its' lendtrj treatment of the pork buons. und prolltecrs "I'-U pork' .Le taken up later. L.ibor Leaders Satisfied. There Is n general feeling of satis- faction apparent amonp the labor leaders at the progress made by the commission. At Its mcetlnp tod.iy the commis- sion concluded consideration of penal- the Uiitlsh dinft deallni; xvlth .ind Mr. .Sinclair I ties for failure to entry out obllsu- I'ecl.irod 'have si own fat and flour- I tions with regard to the'laboi sltua- uhtil under tlio IHK-CS ot the tlon. The commission also considered food liunl." I the pbsitlon o[ selt-governinp doinin- Tlie board had made large ions. protectotates and coloulis In tiper.illtureE, but could It be said that a soldier's uliloir has been able to jet a round of beef any cheaper in cor.sfciuencts Amid much laughter i cd. on all ikies. '.Mr. Slnclu.r urged the I.tberula If tliey intended to return, to come back xvhilo there wai time. The debate will be com limed to- morrow nftnnoon by .Mr liauthler. of rit. Cirvell Pint Speaker in Afternoon lion R Carxi-11 was the tli.st Jfti'iter this afternoon xvhi-n dt-luitu on ihe address In reply to the speech from the throne xuis resumi-d. He Maphi'lzed thu of the rroXfm.1 which Cannd.i has to face Ingettln- hack fruin a xv.ir to a pcaci; tun HoHcxer. lie saxe as his tluu no xvarrmg nation was Ins better condition at the ce.ssatlou "I hostilities than Canada. He said Vttit u ore Jnn as many abnormal to In- oxi-icome In cort- h who did not go to In connection xx'ith relurntcl He paid some on to the it-niaiks of .Mi. Mc- of I'.roine, and "I xxant to six- to him that 1 I not x-t-ry far apart on of t'io matters mentioned by to labor legislation, and what conditions mlibt be tiilnllud to t-nablo the proposed oiKanizatlon to be altei- Samuel Clumpeis. chairman of commission, prthided at the SEATTLE STRIKE Report Keep Reds in Russia. then wtiit on to thU did nn to the of .Mr The (oinlitlous in Kns- depicted to government, th.lt wis the pliice to lioNhevists foi some and OMO problem they had ft Camd.i was how they could Mine of iheir Lack to the That Men Arn Ordered Back to Work is Denied San Francisco. Cal Feb. boiler makers and engineers on sttlke in Seattle have been ordered back to work by their International otllcers, through Jos Heed and Win. McKen- zie the representatives lespectivcly of 'the International organizations in that city It xvas announced here to- dax by Pr. Mai shall, member of the federal shipbuilding labor adjustment bo ird. who has Just completed a sur- vey of strike conditions un the coast. Di. Marshall will leave tomorroxv for Philadelphia. Report la Denied Seattle. Wn, I-'eb. of the strikers' conference committee, xvhlch represents the 25000 striking shipyards xvorkers In Seattle, tonight denied that boiler makers und en- gineers participating had been order- n, liv -Tn4 Kopil and Hope for U.S. Support of Leaqaie of Nations "London. :ii. (Associated on President Wil- son's Uostiin spech takes Hrst place on the editorial pases of this morn- iiiK's London newspapers They unite j in expressing the hope that the presi- dent's appeal for support of the league of nations xvlll meet xvlth a favorable reaponbo In the United States. "We can be as confident as Presi- dent Wilson Is." says the Dally Mall, "that their generous impulse, disin- terested aid and guidance will not fall his people now, but rather calu strength and permanence, as the need for It xvas never greatpr. Tho alter- native is that the United States should rotuin to her traditional Iso- lation and resrard the welter of Eur- ope from afar. Such a decision is unthinkable. The Uunted States Is i In the war; she must be In the peace. The Pally Nexvs siys: "Piesldent Wilson knows that America has only begun Its task and that the breach with Washington's policy Is final Kxerx- pacillc Interest in Kurope will be with the president In his appeal to his people. We do not think that the appeal will be in vain for the president has a grand gospel and knoxvs how to preach it." The Daily Telegraph says: Ihe of the peace conference constitute a slcnal to the world that It Is at the roads In its destiny. Tlie president Is not xvronK in liig that Kurope looks toward the people of the United States with new confidence. Of America's sympathy with ihe essential ideals for which Pit-sklent Wilson Is laboring so ile- xotedly. none need have any doubt, and we are confident she xvill continue to take her full share in the ureat task of regeneration which confronts jsoy ruil plaxpd the traitor to the ix'lio had bc-lpfil them, and if ucre the men that Mr. 'Mc- friendly to, "then." said I'arxell. tu> and I must pait Cnrve'l on I D11IIIMI1 J M M lit I -I thirty million dollam the fomln- il-c il >ear He -Tn-il vould lu> crltk.sr d the government laru'e amount of .M'llplmildlmr pro- million or million di-llars this ve'ir dur- Ho sm of j and Mr farxell ad- that It the poxeinmcnt had j into t'm main ft after the I 'atlo-i of are tl.e chips inlcht I I'fcn I i or price. I Unemployed Problom j 1 ih it the Kox-arnment PioiciaiiuiH- ixouhlJir of i the un-' ed to return to xvork by Jos Heed and Win McKenzle. representatives of International organizations of the two unions. Forecast by Dr. Marshall of a coast- wide orRiinl'zatlon of iind employees lo formulate a ncxv xxase atcreemenl l.s t.xken to indicate the strike in Seattle, Tacomn. Aberdeen and Anacortes. affectlnff approxi- mately -10.000 would end xxlthln ajveek.___________ Two Policemen Shot Dead. Haliway. N.J.. James Lynch and Jacob Kr.ius weie shot dead today while attempting to nrrcat u number of men suspected of hnvhiR engaged In a atreet llRht. The officers xxcio felled by bullets from an automatic revolver as thev lorced their way Into a house where brawlers had barricaded re- and the answered Seveial prlsoncis were taken and one confessed llrln? the shots. The Problom uneniploxc-il pi underlxmi: had Of Its inUli m. In fact, pimciple xxhicn in mind Iu the L-illm.itcs lie- to the propo'-al million dollars on Mr. Carxell HlH tht xote was to be n 1'LrlOil of live >ears April i hh'i'iFarxe" the xvoi k done viri-ifi y bv the pro- of Qnehec "If." 1IH could only extend hish- hluhxvays CONFERENCE TO DECIDE FATE OF GERMAN SHIPS London, Feb. ques- tion of the destruction of the surrendered German warships is a mutter for the peace eon- foreui'o to decide, according to an announcement made in the house of lords today by the Karl of Lytton, civil lord and parliamentary secretary to the admiralty. Chronicle says of the speech: "He appeals to America for the Ilrst time to play her part in the unspttled terri- tories of the old world and protecting the >OUIIF natlon.s. If ho .succeeds; m curving his' hope with him In the nexv'ciusade he -will have succeeded in rendering a. second hervlco to man- kind as sient tnnl of brlnslns _ln the United States to llnKh the war French Preas Favorable Comment Paris Feb. Temps, in Its leading editorial lodav favorably comments on President Wlbon's efforts for u league of nations, .in for the Ilrst time announces Its full support ot the covenant for the. for- mation of the leaBue. which It de- clirca 13 "necessary for universal order, and uB.ilnit which no coiisid- eratlons of party should prexal. and Is a permanent means for -an Inter- national orRanlntlon capab e of m- rmlilnir. deciding and eNcciitlnff. Ireland No Vote in League. One senator pressed Inquiiles latlnK to the Irish question, pi-erfident xvas n.iid to have [hat Ireland would have no vote in t ho league ot nations at present and hat the Iil-h question was one for Uter solution between Ireland and Knaland ______ TWO SUBS FOR CANADA Australian Government Offered Six Destroyers and Six Submarines London, Feb. nlvlns to Lieut. Col. Right Hbn AValter LonB. Hist lord of this -admiralty, stated in the house of commons today that the Imperial KOV- Vinment had offered Ihc Australian government six modern destroyers and modern submarines. ixvo submarines had been prciented to made bv other dominions, said Mr. Lonq. xvould receive mobt bMnpathetlc consideration. omphas.l7.ed the fact tn.it i Austialiiin navy XXMS in an stuuc of development. Col Buriroyne asked If the two sub- marines given to Canada xvere the same two which had been, .taken fiom her. or xvere they icpllcd: "I In the lap ot is coming, xvlnti" has a kick in It .xet, and fuss and ul- sters continue to be the iru.it desir- able apparel Last nisht there was' some reduction In the of the wind, but at the thermom- eter was touching tho JS beloxv mark KHoxxhero on the praliie.H Ihe diop xvan much loxver Home may llnd cunsoUtlon In that, but fie experi- enced xvlll say let the uulcksllver drop and cut out tlie wind and xve'll be better pleased Howextr, theu- is ureater comfort In the fact th it oui sphere Is on hotter terms wllh the sun. That we had sucn a day as jesterday xx-ith the cold wind rushlrit; out of the north to even up m itters south Is proof of our approach to the .sea-son of slnglnar birds ard ojienlui; buds. Let them all omit, no doubt, xvould be the prayer of many. Forty-Nine Bolow at Sa-ikatoon. Saskatoon. Snsk., Fcb. -ti. nis'ht was the coldest .hern thlu xvlfi- ter Uie minimum tempei-iture ibelnp 19 lieloxv zero. A fou- xx-as cleared by the rislm- sun. and the temperature incroa.se-1 steadily dunnar tho d iv. Calnarinns arc Suffering. ratearv. Alta. Feb. 2-5. With a bitter southeast xvmd sxveeplnt? across the city and the temperature hox-er- InK between .ind b-low zero. C.ilKarv Is sufferlnir acuteU from the cold snap which has lasted since InM Friday, and the Kas pressure l.s still extremely loxv. Kicilitlos for deliv- ery of coal and xx-ood are at a premium, and in homos where Ras Is not Installed, the people suffering for xvant of fuel, xvhlch Is availably in the city, but cannot be dcllveied oxvlnj; to the lack of convex anccs. Little Snow at Edmonton. Kdnionton. AHa Feb. L'G i a llfflit snoxvfall this afternoon, ac- companied bv a drlvhiR ten-miH- ca--t wind The temperature ninsed from 11 heloxv to 2iJ beloxv for the early part of the day, but this attei noon at 1 o'clock the Rovernment tlu-imometer registered Id beloxv. The indications are for a. continued cold spell In this -......Moose Jaw Pans, Feb. -G Premier Clcrnen- cuail left Ills residence tlil-l aftei noon for thu Ilrst time since he xvas shot last Wednesday A lam'e croxvd had around the housu in the hope OL' sei'in-i the premier, althousli tilt- hour had been Kent secret. Cheers and cues of "Vive I'lemicr Clomen- cc.ul" were raised as he stepped from the house and entered an auto with Lauhiy The piemier's fact1, which shoxved si'jns of llie fexer he had been 'lirouuli, bore n. pleased --iiiilu as he thu gteetinx-' SI. Cleinenceati today dl.'icussed general affairs with Sfveral of collaboratoi-M. Per-iilsslun to do XXM.S fru-un him by his plivstclans. Captain Uouchanlon, nf the Purls .Mllltarv court, yesterday atternooii arJ the exidence of persons xx-hu xveie oixe-wllnesm's of the attciivptrd -.asslnatlon of Piemier Clemenceaii. He lias asked Dr. Hoii-KiuoxvUch, a widely known alienist, to examine mlu Colt n. M. Clemencenu'.s as- salliint. to determine his decree of mental icsponslbility. Captain Douchardon will call ut M. Clemen- ccau'.s home tomorroxv to take ihe premier's deposition. Paris, Fcb. Cable from John W. economic as- pects at peace have received very little, consideration as yet, but at an early date an economic commission la to bo appointed to make rccom- mendatlunH as lo how effect can be given to tho thiid point of the four- teen points upon which peace Is to ii'tt. by which It in stipulated that us far as possible, economic; Imrilurs me to be removed between nation' and of trade conditions IK ti be established. When the duclsloi to appoint this commission was i cached It was agreed that the IJilt- ish dominions and India aim have direct upon It as their economic Intelests .ire by m means Identical with those ot Ureut Hntaln. I Lind M liner, for the em- iplre deleuatloiis, who had ali dJsrii.shed the matter and had upon this policy, advocated the tho to special lepre- .sentatlon, and view accepted by thu conJi-renco. It Is understood that each ot the Rieut poweis will have two repiesentativeH there will live the .smaller powers. To these will bo added two ftom the Htlilnh domin- ions and one from India. Thus the Ilritl.sh Kmplrc will liavt Ihe hentativi'-i In a body ut eighteen. Has Important Dutias. The duties of the commission will he extrtmL'ly Impoitutit. The orinlii.il Daylight Saving Law Prevented Accidents Washington, Feb. of labor leaders that a national day- light saving law, making all wording tours daylight hours, would red'ice he number of industrial was ionic out in the past year, said I-ranl{ Morrison, secretary of the American federation of Labor, in a statement oday urging that the law be no! re- pealed. Provision for llie repeal of he act has been attached by the sen- ate committee as a rider to the annual Agricultural Appropriation Bill. Secretary Morrison cited statistics on industrial accidents in Pennsyl- vania showing that in 1918, under operation of the daylight saving law, the number of accidents was 93.036 less than in 1917. and 70.772 less than in 1916. This was due, he said, lo the fact that the late afternoon hours, when physical energy is at ils lowest ebb, have been eliminated from the and given over to re- creation. EXPRESS RATES Railway Commissioners in Session in Alberta Hear Many Arguments CREAM TRADE THREATENED Edmonton Board of Trade Not to Oppose Increase if Necessary to Sustain Companies ORIENTAL LABOe International Representative Ex- plains Why Chinese and Japs Not Desirable to Unions HOG PRICE UNDECIDED im- so Impix'HHlon that Pic.sldcnt Wilson in his thud point faxoicd mil VIM sal fruo trade no loiiKei pi ox alls, luit thu ad- visability of tin bidding the carrying on of economic wars by differential tarlft.s, sovei nmerit hounthb and dumping-, will bo considered. The proposition that the moat fav- ored nation arrangement, when made j by two members of tin: league, inii.it be extended to .-ill the other mum- bei.s, will undoubtedly bo submitted. The alternative view la thnt while this might b'e laid down as a KC-II- eral pilnclplu of the league, members should be allowed to contract them- selves out of thu obligation to ob- ierve It. With the pit-Bent wide dif- ference In production co.sts, n rljild Food -Administraticn Fails to Roach application of unlfoimlty of tariff A 4 M- ,m Prirn Poliev tiuutmcnt Is llkuly to be tcHl.itoil. and Agreement on Mm.mum Pnco Policy claim fm. of Washington. Fob. food ad- mlnlstriition today failed to reach a decision reyardniK continuance of Its) minimum price policy .'.fti-r mid- night. Friday. Conferences were held first with the war trade board, and later with President Wilson and his cabinet. Food admlnlstr itlon officials snlrt whether prices for March would be ameed upon, depended upon the lifting of tin- embargo of shipments of pork to neutraU rind other nation.1; President Wilson was said to have taken the imestlon under advisement dropped is of tho winter, with the thermometer le'lsterlns' below and a strong north to northeast wind blowm.-r. making conditions In f--e leral uncomfortable. At abated and tho temperature to 3 below. Toda.v the hrlKht. felt. __ _ _ Three Boys Drowned While Skntmo Napanee, Out.. Feb. Ihiee hoys '1'eddv Ford and tw o brothers. nanied Castaldl. who.se iges ranKo from 10 to 13 years, we.e dtowneil while -skating on the river t Is aftei noon at about o'clock. Ihc bo.v.s fen through n hole, wheie ice had been cut but the cold Is 111 greatly CONDEMN DAYLIGHT SAVING Many Demands Made by Alberta Ag- ricultural Fair Association Calpary. Feb. -'li. Resolu- tions condemning the "JJayliRMt Sav- IIIB" a-s detrlmontal t-> farm life, and asking Hi-it not Ufj re-enacted: favoring the In the summer fallow contest, a ic-dlvlsion of the province for the purpose of electing delegated, maklnfi the line between North and South :it Ked Ueor, In- stead of IJidsbury. and a resolution of .sxmpathy with J. Cook, of Coclirane, were passed at the meet- ing of the provincial Agricultural Fair association thl.s afternoon. To Make Work Compulsory. London. Feb. liC. The soxlet Koveinment. says a wireless despatch. Is Instituting :t of ic-Kistiation, piepar.il'try to i-ufot the principle of compulsory work for all. ___________ Japanese Losses in mur. Ftb. nn eu- between Jaii.inese and P.ul- forces twenty miles east of yjlasovlMluchensk. capital of tlio province, the Japanese lost two officers and eighteen men killed and twenty men wounded. The HoIsheviK force "wa.s estimated to number Plan Calls lor an International Labor Conference Each Year the Mr tho advanced 1.-eb- Press Despatch from UeuUii's. Limited.) Interviewed by Kcutci's correspon- dent, today, the British Jaborlto min- ister C. N. mritca, save some details of the progress of the international labor legislation commission which Is now nearlng the cud of i" The Urltlsh draft, whu-h only one discussed, has been with vciy little altcratlcn. opinion "of various tiadt who'came to Paris to at- p.esentatlves of the nrlt..sh s will mean very diast c. ami welcome changes In labo, conditions thioughout'the world. Mr. Uarnes. after the commission wns meiei> a way toi a lasting laboi .said that the an International full liberty in eholee of doIcB-Ufs with the of tho state concerned. The 'annual conference would con- sider proposals collected by the ex- ecutive with the object of conventions or bills -such questions as the j.totcctlon of and chlldieu. length of woiklng hours and minimum latts of To Eliminate Bitter Competition. suMi leKUlatlon.s, It hoped tlon.s to make special tariff inentH with one another where it l.s lo their Intel csta to do to. To Dispose of Pro-War Treaties. Other matters to he dealt wilh be the disposition ot pie- war treaties and conventions ut an economic; char- acter, to which enemy states wuic p.aitles incIudlnK cop.MiKMt, postal etc. Decisions upon all these points will be part of the peace ticaty, and will then hecoine liictors In the future econ- omic life of the League of Natlon.s. In addition to thebu  et been fully orKanlzed. !t is supposed to be made up of live i e- preHontatlvoH from Sieat power. each representative helm; familiar with the particular duties of one of allied Up to the r-resfiit time, the Hrltlsh up- itolntcd only two membew, Loid Hobt. Cecil, minis-tar of blockade, and Kir .John Bealo. who Is .specially ijuallned to deal with food HiippHefl When thl.i council created upon the Initiative of President Wilson, It was announced that It would cease to exist with the- slgnlm? of peace. but If It is to be charged the responslblo duties of conirollliiK and allocating. supples and raw mat- erials between allies, and ox-enemy countries for leconslrue- t'.on purposes after the war, then- will be need that tho full Hrltlsh he appointed In order that the economic Interests of ITUish dominions may be L-d durlns this critical period. Calsary, Feb. uuca- tlon us lo whether and J-'ip- .should be allowed to become iibera of the United Mine Worit- of America was dl.scusscd at this morning's stHHlon of the miners' con- vention, and in this connection the viewpoint of the International w given on the subject. When one of the delegates moved that C'hlne.se be bailed trnni incinbe ship, Kd. Uabthain, of Humbli stone, rather scored the delegates for .sug- gesting Unit anj nationality .shonid be bun ml. and wanted to know wheix they intended drawlnif the line. Dave Irvine. International icpri-Hon- tntlvc. entered into a explana- tion a.s to why Chlneco and .lapani1 woie not dnnirnble IIH members ol their organization. He stated that where they found these, people In majority, they absolutely lufuHcd ti join the Unlttd Miners. Three dulegateH were elected thlr morning to attend the policy commit- tee of tho Intel national union at In- dlaniipolis. These weie the prenldunl P. Al. ChrlHtophcr, Alex. Suwnar. and Frank Whi-ntlev. U was aLso anaiiKCi that any mib-dtatiicl could at thel own expence HCIII! a repiewentative to llie total of oiaht. Oppose Orientals Entry At tho concluding ae-sslon today a reaolutlon was pasm d emphatically oppo.sed to tho Introduction of orien- tals Into tho mines, or their miry Into the country. Tlilh wa.i fatheied by Organizer, David Irvine, and arose out of a discussion of tin- question Introduced by Delegate LfesHCttl. of Colcman. H.C. this morning centred around the future of the District LcdK- ur of Fernle, H.C., and the matter of bulling the plant and moving tlie paper to Calvary will be left entire- ly In the hands of the executive com- mittee. tlreetliiKH of the convention were .sent to thu woilu-r.s In and the HilP.slan soviet. The next meet- of the convention will be hold In Calvary in 19J1. t was granted cm of BACONSITUATIONGOOD Promiso of Market for All of Canada's Exportable Surplus Ottawa. Feb. Thomas While btalcd thftt lu.i reports from oveisf.-n rcipeutlnc til'1 bacon situation The JJrltl.s'i luoil min- istry will purchase a aninunt i.f! tonnage Immodl.ili-ly and tin1 Mntl.sli miirltct will free for corniiicrL-i.il purchases and Importation ifter .March I, and for cumim.rci.kl .s.ilo aril dlhtributlon after April 1. provide a niaik--t for all exportable .surplus of Canada un- der conditions .-allHiactol tu I ro- ducer.s a-id Sir Uobci I lior- den and Ur Hob. rtson been the matter clone .itteiilon for some weeks past._______ C.P.O. Freight Manager in Europe. Montreal, Feb. circular has been Issued by M. Ho.sworth. chairman 'h" Canadian Ocean Scrvlc'H Limited, appulnllnK Andrew- H Allen, freight manager for (ire.it Itrltiln and the. (iintlnuiit. n- HevlnK H- S C umlch.iel thu of that position The ofllcch ol Hie Irelb'lit are at LUorpool Canadian Nickel Discoverer Dead Sudbiiry, Out. Fill. News hns reached lu-re "f tin- dt-alh In Vp.si lantl, Mich., of man who Ilrst IJilmontoii, Aila.. Feb. JH Tho oard of railway cotnin..isionors al heir afternoon j-esalon hera tod.iy, onsldered thu application of tin- in-bs Tiafllc aaboclatlon nf C.'ii.idn or an Increase in express latea. 'hen: waa HtroiiK object inn by th.' epresi'nl.itlves uf local .ir- and the piopo-i-d ren.se of rates vitally .iffect.H tlifl ream IndiiHiry of the .inntrs their repreiii'iitatixes made treiiuolj.-i oplio.ikltoi) to tlie pi opita.il. allt-h-ed that tho Increase. If would atn-ct t3i--m to tne cx- Jfi per CL-III. ol Ihe pi. >enl cll.il'K.-.s. C F. FHhu-, secret.ny of the Kd- moitlou board nf trade, who -aid lilt he .il.io n-pieiente.l lij.l llldlMdll- il fartin-rs and 117 farming in hlH di.ituct. told the hat they had authoi him to ub- e-jt to tin-' rate incMM.-c Icr. he hail mule .st.it- iiu-iH the chairman oi die board, JMr II. mv Dr.iyiDii. remarked ih.u Mr lad'.iliu-Jlt tins kcjiiote of Hi'' Mtuii- lou and that board would lie (juld'-d ill M-achl'n; a .1. ci ion iy what In: had told tin-in Extant of Raiio the Probljm. The bonril of trade. Mi. l-'IMi'-i u wculd not oppose, tin1 If it could be MIOWII till, liu.roa.sch weie abnolutely to 1. the CMS companies out of hipinl-i- tiun niobleiil ill lll.lt ca-e w.. to ihu extent of the ial.se. Hut tlu board wa i not piep.irtd to admit wlthuiit further Information, that tl cumiiunleH had mide out a case. Thu lAianI, for iiiHlance, ha-! m> formatliin as to the- bonded Indc'ited- neMH of the Dominion com- pany, which had claimed to .suf- feied .i lift in operation 111 live jears, ol did IL h.uis Inform itlon as' to the actual amount of capital InvciU'd by Ihe Hluireholders of that corponnion. Nor had it Information a.s to tin- propor- tion of the total reientu: of 711. which wa.s t-arncd iM.-it i-'f Sinl- bury, where they asliliiB S7 per cent. Increase, or west ui that jiolnt. where they awkcd per cint. iu- cica.se. If the aiciaxu incna.se .'in per cent. applied the- revenue the. live years referred to. It would mean an Inci ease In revenue of and, In tllo ileduL-llon of that net IO.SH it lelt Jll.ril7.711 cox IT tliu IteiiiH of bond Interest and divi- dends on capital Inxciitmetit. or ox er JJ.UUO.OUO per annum. Thin wouM pay HCVUII per cent, on a capital In- of The bo.inl In-Ill that it wan inciiiiceha.'ile lliat auv sum remotely th a amount in actually invented In th'i enlerpi Costs Will Probably Decline. Mr. FlHher .said that tin- reiiuetU (rune 'it the time when tlii- very pe.ik of costs had pi i bablv been l [-.idled and tlK'K- was Indlia- tlou that these  Teh 19.-f Associated to j- conf, Inauaki. of Marcli 11. a i-.-oluion that a the offer of the Iiillllssloil i i had been machinery piovldes of the league of nations Employees to Choose Delegates. rb.-it they hoped ternatlonal Thoie will cxccuthe Mi- Harne-s said that to hold their first annual i confeience thlh autumn, nl-o be an international committee to carr> on w  I'.o. it was announced .md have tjei-n ,t ''u'ulla i.i done isu-D Villa fiom car- .it ainl Amuicaii xvei" paid at Mid. General Kalmikoff. bun by .Marcli 1,   

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