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Winnipeg Free Press Newspaper Archive: August 21, 1900 - Page 1

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   Winnipeg Free Press (Newspaper) - August 21, 1900, Winnipeg, Manitoba                                VOL 26. WINNIPEG, TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 1900. MTl'A'I'IO.N IN I 11 IN A. in lie-- imperial palave, Li Cl.ang ll.-.s mii.1..- l a- I'l-r [.cue.-, but il U l tri" l.'niLe'i Staltrs ur ;n. lias s--nt a ni-jo- l; ma'-in. in f'hina. i; :.--..i; i: iv-- del'--.Lt'-il T.'-I.IH aL'-.-r 'iai-1 tif.hiin-; at Meuu- ,'.i i -i'. a: pill pn I y. 'I'lel'l !..is 1- ft in.. ai.'MM.VKV. l-'r.-i- 1 JlilS-s. The Krst .ji-.i: Major has Itnsti.ubui-g. the second i IA..I.S went tn Veei-eer.i- i'..'. M is'-n .is v.itb HI' Till-: Chinese Troops Still Surrounded by Allied Armies in Palace Grounds at Pekin. Official Advices State Decapitation is Fashionable Among the Empress' Party. in wiiu-.J. ..f Il.'.t ,1 I'.v Minn.. il'lt'nTi- '.i''i f .r i-linriiiil Ti... t.- I'.o Whilu 1'ii.ul !lM ri nf th-.- Japanese c.m- sul general at Shanghai, saying Sl'.er.g ii'-.-dits the report that the empress d-iuag'.-r and probably the emperor aUo had left I'ekin. as tin: privy coun- lil cr..ssed the Lu Kon bridge on the Uth Sparing the banner ot the Imper- il-1 curicse. Also '.hat Prin. c.-iing wa.s still in Pekin, although Prince Tuan had followed the empress dowa- AlllPH Want More Troop.i. pr.ibalily to the 1'ckiu wires being cui, little news of conditions in the Chin- ese capital has come through this morning. What ha-s been received in- dicates'thai, the allies are in need of reinforc-menis. The commander of tin: Italian sec'.nd '-lass cruiser mosi-a telegraphs frum Taku. accord- Ing to the'r.ome i-ori-espondi-nt of the Datlv Mail, that ve-y urgent requests were cominsr from Pekin on rfatuiday for the imme-iiate of further and that in answer ;o those Italian marines seat ulf haste. I'rotccting the I'alace. T-h-- Japanese minister in London is xi'il to have a last veiling announcins' that subsequent to tile entry into Pekin u Japanese .i.-uichmenl went to the Imperial pal- ace In afford whatever protection was necessary. The enemy were in stivnKih' i-.nd was still pro- 'lie message wa.s sent i-i Toki'i. Tlie nisin body of the Jup- ,in...s.- was at Ting Men gale, Tartar city, with headquarters at .hir-am-se legation. Reports of presence of th" empress are -itir. contradictory, but. CTen. Lu, the alltliority of a Shanghai cor- respondent of the Standard, is defin- itely announced to he a prisoner by orders of the empress dowager ill the Imperial "This, cii.s" SHV.I the i.-oi-resprindent. a (rood thing, as detention in the tal will enable him to negoliate with -he allies' c'-ninianfler.ivhicli he would do'pn ;ts to Prince Ttian's enemy. Dif: minister in London, Sir Chili Chen Lo Feng, on being asked as to the whereabouts ot the emperor and empress dowager replied have irone westward to the old capital. Hsian I-'u. and I think they are 'tiute safe there." Message From tlic (iuranH. Queen Victoria, has sent the foHow- ir mes'-ige to the commandant m irines'al Pekin "I thank Hod that "Ju and those under your command have been rescued from your pel ilmio situation. With my people I e w "ted with the deepest anxiety for good news of your safety and the hap- pv termination of your heroic and prolonged defense. 1 grieve .or tni r.ssi-i and sufferings experienced has left Yoko- hind a.t Shanghai. ItTinslan Intrigue. Mr. Julian Ralph, in the Daily Mail this morning Quotes from a of high standing, whose .s not riven who declares that Kusbia is f endeavoring to secure An l.'nder 111" cir.-umslani es. it is prob- abl" thai tliere will be a conference in order Ihal the pow -rs may act in unison. No Disrespect to Their Majesties. Another important development is I hat two of tlie inih.ential viceroys ul' China h.ive made auplica' Inn to the powers, including, it is believed. Cnited St.ites. that no disrespect lie shown to the emperor a.nd the cm- press dowager of China. U is under- stood that the government is inform- ed that at least one o! thr-continental powers is prepared to answer that there will be no pers-nal indignity or disrespect to their majesties. Tin: conditions inside of I'ekin was made more clear to-day bv the dispatch published from Admiral Itemey. At the war department il was said that the allied forces had apparently found a state of anarchy in Pekin. ConSL-.iuently it. had been found ne- cessary fur the troops to restore ur- der. Times Coinmni'.s. Loud.m, Aug. Times -leal- ing with the dispatches from Wash- ington says "This proposal of Li Hung Chang, as il is reperled. does not afford a possible basis "f negoti- ations of any kind. I'mil we have definite infi-raiati'm as to the politi- cal silualion in Pekin we i-annnt hi sure that the first duly "f the may be to set up a government with which they i an ireat. The time for negotiations has yet arrived. When it does ar- riv" "they must be ojj.-ned upon a dif- ferent basis from tl.at suggested in the Washington telegrams and must be conducted by a different negotia- tor from I.i Hung if they are to have any good results." Becapltat Ion. Shanghai. Aug. -0.-0f1icia.l Chinese advices from Pekin say that Hsu Tung and Yi Lien Yuan, of the anti- i'M'visrn party, and Li Shan, a pro- foreigii'-r. have been decapitated, and thru Yung Lu has been imprisoned bv Princ" Ching. It is added that Ihe others and the dowager empress are west of ivkin, under the consiraim of Prince Tuan. Li Hung Chang goes north 'immediately. Hong Tung was v member m >-i- imperial r.ecrftariate and -1 the civil board. Li Shan was a men.- b of ministry of the Impenal household. The identity ol. Ii 1-eii Yuan cannoi be traced. New York. Aug. :M.-An afternoon o-ipc'- ptiblisheil a Shanshai dispatch saying -that the Chinese report omc.ai- iv that Li Fing Hens, before reported wounded, died on August 1_. After a Hani riglit. St. Petersburg. Aug. OrlolT, chief oi staif to the Kussiai forces in China, reports to- the war olfic..- the defeat ..C Chin-se after hard ligl-.t, the captuv, of Tuk Shi Pass and the occupation of Meduchei. An Imperial ukiisc lias been issued prohibiting t h.: cxpor a tioji ol' arms or ammunition to l hin.i Waldomcn Leaves Tor China. Berlin. Aug. 'JO.-Field Marslui .'omit Von SN'aldersee, n.-comram-" by his staff, left Kerlin this uioriiitis -n route for China. Responding- to x. hurricane -.1 ''fieeit in "'aijjinji'. jCouiu'j y sjiid humorously shall try what can be done He had a, great ovation when he passed through .Leipsic, Itatisbon and Munich. At f.io Havarian capi- tal he was welcom...-.! by tho prim-e re- Belil Count Von takes with him "campaign house but t of an asbestos preparation, light. proof and weatherproof, witn acven rooms and a bathrojm. 'I'llC Is Pursued. London. Aug. UU.-T'.u, Japan.-se cavalry has left Pckln in pursuit (.t the dowager empress and her court, according to telegrams from the north received at Shanghai by Chinese olh- cials" These dispatches aver that the empress and her treasure train, pro- tected by troops, have already arrived at Wu Tai San, in Shan fai BrlllKli aucl J-'rench Land. The landing of British troops at Shanghai is not causing excitement among the natives. A detachment of French marines landed Customs cruisers are reported to have gone to Tien Tsin to take away the foreigners rescued from Pekin Many influential Chinese have interested themselves in the fate of a Chinaman sentenced by an Knglit-h court at Hong Kong to six months imprison- ment at hard labor because he was a member of the Tried society. INTERVIEWED MR. WHVTE ei- of the Free Press asked for their decision. "There is nothing was the re- ply. "Does tin- prospect towards a settle- ment appear mo-e favorable'.'" "Well, yes." said the chairman, "il looks li'rifrliler si-ace Ibis morning." No amount of could eli- cit anything from the commit- tee. Morning Session. "N'o advancement at ill on cither side." That was the statement of. Mr. ''ross yesterday. when asked by a reporter for news as to the strike de- velopments. Tin- machinists commit- tee were in consultation with Mr. Cross all morning and still hold out for a general increase in wages a.ll round. Th-y v-'i'.l again meet Mr. Cross this afternoon. "What will be done by tho company if the men continue to hold asked the rf.pori.pr. "We are still able to run our trains as usual." was tiie nc-n-commiltaJ reply. high do some of -the wages run'.'" was asked. "For some classes ut work as high as per day." CAME FROM RAT PORTABE, .Minn., Wish f a Young Man who Is Ac- cuacil 'f HnrniiiB a Itay ftatU. St. Paul. Auj. K. Ura- a young man from Hut Pori- On1.., started in to make t-hings Jarm the day he struck Roseau by burning a lia> stack. The Roseau county authori-ies are undeterminei what "disposition to mak.- of the case FIS lii-iuiam suffers, il is said, from periodical fits 3f insanity and ll.i-s s mania for bun.'ing things. The stilts hoard of corre' lions and charities re ce'v'd a letter from County Attorne; Belf to-day, who wishes to have (ir.i- ham deported to itat Portage. T-h- board's action cannot, be until Secretary J. F. Jackson FIRE AT WOLSELEY. Thp Mill and Elevator trnypd Smull Uuantity of 1 lour S.n- nil Kscape of the Town. Woiscley, Aug. Wednesday night ;iu alsina uf lire lieiird in our town, and il was fininil Hint the niill anil eleviit'ii' Wiis on lire. The lire wns first observed about H.13. A Inl'Ke iiuniljer of willing hiiiuls sunn funiii'd a luli'ki'l lil'iu'.'lde. Inn I lie lielwcen ic Mvu buil'liiiKs, it. '''mid erctin- nislieil iilld so.in Kol lieyiiiid mlitnil. .V small 'liuint.it v of ll'-lir suvil. iinnilnii was to the siivmu" "f ii- section linn--., iind the suply "f water i.....i C. I'. It. tiilik mid t'.ie ell.-i-ts ut 111- IOWI1 til'-' liriKMlli: wi'l'c suci-essflll I I lie iirlil a v.-ry ,HUI-I oin1. "i" tli.'i'wise the t.'Wii itself wiiult. hiivi: been "Then-' clevulni- al.mit lii.inin illshi-S ef wh.'.U. some il I" ing li''l'l by Ihe K..-.-I-S 1'. bush.-Is; M. Slur-. Oin bnsh- Is. il'H .bull's S.-'ill, i a'" bushels, nsiu'i-il; 111" I-'tween ,un -i....... pal'lliily nisiil-i-il. id lo-- alli.llt Sli'i.iiiili. h is Hie I'liinpanii'S i-hilfi'Sl- -d -in- 111" l.ai-. :im! I'lii'Mi ami Hi" Mlllei's Tin- h.'l'l nvcTliaul'-il mil litl.'d f'H' w-.rk. II will a -i-i-al lu.s.-- I" Ihe mwii :u .1 i-.minium- NO, 39 WINNIPEG OFFICERS IN COfiriAND Claj. Williams With First Battalion, Mounted Rifles, Goes Westward to Rustenburg. Col. Evans and Second Battalion Move Towards Canadians. SOWING ACTIVE INDIA. Minnesota Editors. Montreal. A exeursiul arrived last night of the Minnesota editors. The visitors began th" day's sigh: suing in Montreal by a rip '.o Victoria bridge this morning, riv Cri-and railway authorities lad kir.dlv t-ie structure at he disposal OL the for Ihor- msi.iectii.li. and conveyed the Kirty thither on special train. As the the company they were par- iH'ularly well pleased with Ihe mag- view of the harbor and city which thev obtained from the bridge, party returned to Ihe Bonaven- ture station t o'clock. After a drive around tho <-ily the excursion- ists were taken to the mountain top. where, after .-lion addresses of wel- come from thi- mayor and Aid. Sadler and 'replies from Mrs. (1. tf. of Alexandria. Minn.: II. P. Hall, of S' Paul' A. vYard, -if Fairmont, and others luncheon was partaken ol. Th" repast, passed off pleasant- ly and speecl.es were replied to with International Toronto ".VI and -Mrs. ardson of Clover Hill, celebrated -olden wedding to-dux. Among guests were W. It. Sutherland. Ross S itherland and Mr. and c S Uichardson. who arrived Winnipeg to participate in th-; iv Many friends attended 'enjoyabe "at" home" this after- M-cr.sjity fen- Ah! Will Sunn ItainTiiH Still IliKli. London. Aug. vi.'i-roy of In- dia, telegraphs that the he: .vy general rainfall I'.a.s co'.ltiulled over the most affected iraets. The cro is promise well in the central provinces, sowing is active and the necessity for free kill-hens will surely disappear. Prices, are still very high everywhere. Clu.lera is prevalent throughout Hyderabad am in Bom- bay there are receiving relief. C. It. Employees Appeal. Montreal. Aug. joint com- mittee repn sentmg the conductors and trainmen of the C. P. R., On- tario and Quebec division, who were unable to come lo an agreement with Superintendent Leonard a revision am: an incroiuse the scale OL wages, have now mad-; an -appeal to ilr. M< Xicoll. genera, manager. They laid their case before 'him to- day and were promised an -answer to-morrow. The l-'n-i- cuiTcsp'indoiit with t'ne Canadian Mounlcd ItiMrs in rf-.-uih Africa, writing from Pretoria. the following' Oil S.-iturduy, liie Ilith, the Firs-l railc-i- yudi as il was possible to lind in-.mn' i for- started westward J'or tll'Mli the oti'.ei-s from Hulton's brigade.and it is undt-rslnod that they are "..ungl-i join hands there with JSadon-I'ow .-d. ami his little band of h.-roes from Ma- Colonel Kvans lias gone in command of Ul" Second Mailallon, :ind Major Williams of tiie First. the rest camp here a considerable number of our men remain behind. With i.henl Colonel j.essard, and nearly all the ollicers ol: "A" tiquadmn. Cnju. liiiss, Lieut. Kustuce, Captains Wynne and Cuthbert. As soon as t'ne men can be remounted it is understood that they will rejoin their squadron. Dr. Devine has gone -to Vereeniging with the Second Battalion, also Lieut. Cos- by, who was left behind at biirj.' sick.'out is now restored lo h--.-i !Ui. i-'alln-r Sine-.t. Unman Catholic cliap- lain, left yesterday for Cap.- Tov. n on i duly. IK- returns after a day., i slay Ui.-iv. J Tli-re are a f'-w   cases ihal nei d excite alurm among liioir frieiiils at home. Ind'.-td. I'm- wonder- I'ul hardiness ol' men. most ol whom are used at lion.i- l-> a ill" ol. CMiiosiire uui of do.us, has exci'ed the admira'.ion of all who hav c. me in cor.lac.t with them, and 1 think I am correct when 1 say liiu-t nol a reKiir.eni in our column has surt'i-r. d so little from the effects of fatigue and priv- ations as our men In their lan- guage and manners, in their ideas "1 the sanctity of. property in an -ninny's country, some of them may b-- some- what wild and woolly, but ev-rylxidy adtnits that w-hen it comes to limiting- and endurance they are absolutely and emphatically all there. H. s. WATERWORKS. F.Xl'ERT NOT VKT. TO IN- To Itich their their Mrs Mrs from their noon Want all Canadian Koule. Victoria. Aug. second at- tempt tn bring in a bill to charter n comp-etiiiK line to the White I'a-sa mad was foiled this afternoon upon UK- same pnlii-y of the Dominion gov- ernment in wailing a. .settlement of Al-i.skan boundary question and thus conserving an all Canadian ml" interesis. such a war begins. Formal Request. Shields "utarian Uapldun 1-utuness Jauita ..Uvcriiool j .Glnsjrow .Hiitliurst. j Inward. 1 i point ClasjWW! -Klner .S Falni'i- 1'olnl r-e'r dseire to make terms. Ihe v- of 'the United Steles govern- -has 'not .yet been known iu be named as commissioner tc, IrXtiitp for a cessation ot hostili- s The suggestion is said to be due the fact that as Mr. Conger ia now nshnd has the ad Hi Uv-pi-ii liay. u'rsC struck here to-day, the fall of ain being over I inches in hall an lour. M'uch damage is reported lo rops. Telephone and telegraph wires UlTcred grea'JV.____________ I5cy Drowned. Thomas. AUK. N'-w- ii-k 17 year.i of age. a son ol .lolin N'ow'kirk was drowned while bathing n oner Cre-H. Port Uurwell. yestei- lay. Distressing Accident. Montreal, Aug. distressing accident occurred at 1UO Bleury St. to-night. Charles Iron, a pressman, upset a lamp, which set fire to his in- fan-t child. The mother rushed to the child's assistance and was badly burned. The mother a-nd child were removed to the hospital, and will probably both die. S5U.OOO UamagR at Del riot. i Detroit. Aug. 1'he L'arms of the lower peninsula of Mil higan were .swept by a. severe electric storm tins evening." The damage to crops is im- menue Scores of barns were struck by lightning and burned with their contents. I'.ul one fatality lias been reported. In Detroit the damage will reach Uom'n'oa MJnUlcr Home. Ottawa, Aug. Fielding and 111.in1, with Sir Louis Davies, the Dominion ministers, reached Ottawa, to-night, and will probably remain a, few days. Their trip to Ihe old country occupied exactly one month. Both coming after the duties a very arduous session has certainly done them good. ..Japan Cw'.'Jc JJniWen. New Vurk, Aug. Commer- cial Cable company makes tlie lollnw- ing announcement to ila.m- agt- tn th" telegraph lines beyond blm- monoscki by inundation, messages for Japan, whether by the north- ern or til" eastern are subject tu delay. MR. R. HERING IN EUROPE. C.luiii-c Now Lien Between T. ileiinlngR, Toronto, and -J. T. Fan- ning, Minneapolis CHy Jinglni-cr Attrlliutci Sinking of Pumping Uou.se to Improper Shoring Ite- placlng Broken Pipe will Take llirce Days. The adjourned special meeting of Ihe board works was called lasl evening at 7.120 o'clock. The entire council was present with the excep- tion of Aldermen Sutherland and Carruthers. who are out of town, and the result of the deliberations amounted to practically nothing. After Chairman Ross had tapped the table with an abbreviated boulder a few times in order to signify-that the meeting was on a business basis Testimonial to a Doctor. Fort William. Aug. Sim-Hie was .to-night presented with testi- monial bv the mayor and citizens tor iiis nntir'ing efforts in stamping '.nit Ihc recent smallpox. He isolated himself with tin.- patien'.K during the time reqiLred to stump mi', tlie dis- ease. MASON ENGAGES DE WET Boer Commander 15 Miles From of 600 From Canadians. SirlklnK C. R- Employees Confc With General UuMlloi of General Increase In The committee -representing the ma chinists now- on strike against the C P. Ii. were in consultation yesterday with Mr. Wm. Cross until late in the afternoon. They again pressed for a general increase and were again told that it would be impossible- to grant it lo them. Mn Cross pointed out to committee that -the wages of the skilled men were now grood and in asking for higher -.vages for the minor, men those who should grade high were being regulated by those whose work required little or no skill. The committee were unable to see their way to an agreement and left Mr. Cross to consult with Manager W-hyt-.' What tran-spired between the com- mittee of three, .vho waited on Mr. Wtiyte is not known, but when they came oul after the interview they ap- peared to be .hesit.Uing over some pro- position. Speaking to the chairman of the committee, Hardy, a report- London. Aug. 21.-Special dispatches from Pretoria announce thai Gen. De bivouacked miles from the oity, and that Oolonel Mason wa.s Briskly engaging him yesterday (Mon- day) morning. The Pretoria correspondent of the Standard wiring yesterday says "The trial of Lieut. Cordua. of the Staats artiilcry (charged with being concerned in the plot to kidnap Lord purpose of gaining information. Find- ing that Command" Nek was strong- ly garrisoned, Dn Wet resumed his march northward, shadowed by Gen. Baden-Powell. Canadian Artillerymen. Ottawa, Aug. Col. Drury, who commands a brigade division in the Canadian Field battery in South 1 Africa, sends to the militia depart- ment a. diary of the movements June 4-UU, in which time il moved from and after a few poinls of which were more or less in had been massed, a communication was read by the rity clerk from Mr. John H. Fingland, C. K., offering bio services as a consulting engineer in connection with the waterworks trou- ble. The city engineer stated that he had received a couple of answers lo l-.is inquiries and a telegram was read from Mr. W. F. Jennings, of To- ronto, saying that, lie could leave there on Tuesday at 1 p. in., but. must be back llien.: on Tuesday, the 'JSth. His terms, he were pel- day with expenses, and he would re- quire a fee of not less than Anolher wire was received from U. M. Sinclair, of New York, slating that Mr. Rudolph Hoi-ing was in Ku- rope, but was expected back Aug. ol, and asking if his arrival could be awaited. Aid. Mitchell asked what work the expert, was lo do. Aid. Uuss replied thai a series of questions would hav.-; to be written out for him lo answer, such as devis- ing methods of gelling over the present difficulty and defining the de- fects. Aid. Mitchell wanted to know iC the expert-, was to make up an Inde- pendent report without consultation with the city engineer. Aid. Hell thought this would be rather an absurd way of doing busi- was lust. Aid. Dell's motion was put and carried. j Alii. Home said there was a far I rrrcator liability of. the case being I whitewashed if an .--utsider was se- I lected as a consulting engineer than if a local man was chosen, j Home more discussion ensued ovr I Ihe matter when the committee ad- i journed to meet again some time af- 1 i.er an answer is received from Mr. Fanning. Mornrng Tileeiing. The special meeting of the council yesterday turned out not to be a council meeling at all, but simply a meeting of the board ot works to which the other members of the council were invited. It seems there was some misunderstanding about the matter and the city clerk sent out notices for a committee meeting. There were present when Aid. Ross took the chair, besides himself. Aids. Fry, Spiers, Mitchell, Sharpe and Mayor Wilson. Some time was taken up "in trying to ascertain the charac- I lor of the meeting, when it was de- cided to secure some of the other aldermen and they were telephoned for. In the meantime there was noth- i ing to do but sit around and await their arrival. I During the interim the city engin- I nor, who was present, stated that l Hi-re was no change in the boner 1 room, the walls had been tried with instruments and found to be level. I They were only pumping lightly at I Ihe "well, the output being at Hie rat'; of about two million gallons daily; the water v.-as perfectly clear, with- out any trace of sediment. Tlie wait was enlivened by an alter- cation between Aldermen Ban-lay ind Sharpe. Aid. Barclay thought: here was too -much of a sensation be- ng made of the (.rouble: it was thing like the recent smallpox scare and had been made publli: pr-ma- did and th.U there was no evidence before the court that Gano originated the plot. The court adjourned until to-morrow, when the judge -advocate will sum up." Over BOO Boers Surrender. London. Aug. war office has received the following dispatch from Lord Roberts "Ian Hamilton captured two Krupp guns at Oliphanfs Nek on August Three British were wounded. "Hamilton engaged the Boers ad day August at Roode Kopjes and Crocodile river. There were few cas- ualties. reports that uS4 Boers sur- rendered in the Harrismith district on August 19." Only Cape Town. Aug. De demand for the surrender r.t the British force at Commando Nel; is considered as a pretence for the rifles could defend an area 14 miles against the Boers. Major Hurdman, who commands D battery in South Africa, says in a letter received to-day It is reported the force will leave for home in Sep- tember. Canadian Cagnaltlei. Ottawa, Aug. 20.-SIr Alfred Milner cables from Cape Town that the lowing Canadians are dangerously ill. 7400 Wilson, R.C.R., at Cape Town. 28 Jordan, Mounted Infantry, at De 443'' Ross, Canadian artillery, at B15fnIlfSandercock, Canadian aritllery. Smith R C. E., at Kronstad. Lennox, R. C. R.. at Kimberley. Hushes Canadian artillery. ?hl second message brings news of the serious wounding of 10n Flynn. and the mortal wounding of Corp. Taylor. The latter has since died at Darkop. Both belonged to the hrst Canadian contingent. Ruttan was the only man able to supply him with proper information. Col. Ruttan asked permission to speak, and said there was no one who knew more about the work than himself, without speaking egotistical- ly and no one had the Interest of the work more at heart than himseb. He was willing to give any consulting engineer any information at his com- mand in order lo help him formulate some decision and to enable him to make his report. Ud Barclay said he wished Ihe ex pert lo go fully into the malter and find out some remedy. Md Bell said he did not believe in getting a. man simply for the pur- pose of finding out what was wrong in order to get the knife into some- Chairman Ross retorted that this was not the intention, a man was wanted who -would go into everything and find out what was wrong and what was right and what is neces- sary to put things into proper shape. Then the matter of selecting an ex- pert was considered and the choice seemed to lie between. W. T. Jennings of Toronto, and J. T. Panning Min- neapolis. Aid. Bell moved that J. T. Fan- ning be communicated with. It was explained that the englneei had been instructed to do this on Saturday evening. Mitchell moved in amendment th'pt J. H. Fingland he employed, but this was lost. He then moved that Mr. Esplin be -employed. This also Sharpe replied that it was a natter in which th" public wa.s in- erewfed and he proposed to I .-I. t.lcm vnov about, it. M' the report had originated with Aid. Barclay then it wn'uid have been all right. Han-lay said he had more ex- perience than Aid. Sharpe on sm-h "Of course you have, v-.torteij une att'f. 'you lliiv: mop: expcrieuc.: th-in ar s' in men in th" city, in fact viiiu- oype -inKe with any subj'Mrt un- ler heaven is unlimited. My -exper- ience on the other hand is ina-lenally AUI.U'Harvey and Campbell finally pill, in an appearance and Aid. Honn: followed shortly after. Chairman Ross called Ihe meeting 10 ordc-r. Then he explained the sug- gestions in regard to securing the services of Rudolph H-ring with the allornaiives of W. T. Jennings or J. T. Fanning. Col. Kutuin slated that he had wired Mr. Hering, but had rcceiviMi no reply. Chairman Ross then called lor suggestions. The city engineer in answer lo a question said there was no perceptible ohange at the plant. lie also ex- plained Mr. Hoi-ing's scheme as orig- inally drawn up. In reply to questions from the alder- men he said he did not Ihink there would have have been any trouble it 11 had not been found necessary lo pump out so much water. The pump- ing engines were on their own found- ations and had not settled any; there would be practically no vibration from them. As to the curbing ol the well it had sunk about six inches on Saturday. The. city engineer attributed the sinking of the- pump house wall to im- proper shoring or some other defect in the construction of. the foundation. The broken pipe between the well and. pumps could be replaced in about three days. Then followed a long dis- cussion as to the effect the chimney was having on the walls of the ad- joining building. The chimney was described as hav- ing a foundation eight feet deep a.nd twenty-four feet square of solid con- crete. It rests on, stiff blue clay. Col. flu-Han pointed out that the committee should boar in mind that the water supply. that is the well alone had cost only whereas contractors wanted from lo tlSO.'KX) when Ihe scheme was first mootsnl and if another well was necessary the city would be get- ting oft very well. Aid. Sharpe moved that :in expert waterworks engineer be apfiointed to take charge of the system and be kept on the grounds until it Is com- pleted and handed over to the city. Some discussion arose on this point and the motion being put w.-is lost. ed. This was carried.   

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