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Stonewall Argus Newspaper Archive: May 9, 1917 - Page 1

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Publication: Stonewall Argus

Location: Stonewall, Manitoba

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   Stonewall Argus (Newspaper) - May 9, 1917, Stonewall, Manitoba                                STONE MANITOBA COMBINE TO FREE WORLD FROM MILITARIfUND ABSOLUTISM THHIK WAYS PRESENTED OF ENDING THE WAR increasing Indications That the Central Powers Are Casting Ahom for Some Way to Bring the War to an as the Final Catastrophe is Drawing Near Hungry Germany in a speech de lutrcd a few days ago in New ihe world is out to suppress and and the will pass from Germany when i lohiizollern dynasty is over mid ihc people taken In govi rnmcnt into their own In this statement he has iu d two of the ways in which nnany is undergoing strangula tion a third one is the economic dej of the whole In I Mllur the pressure on Gerj fiiany is that of three differing tornlaird exerted by inraiijv of armies and navies eco by unprofitable expen ditures and an effective vnd encouraged and intenst d by the so far successful revolu tion in Any one of these fac tors might acting in udijnate to otTcct the collapse of resisting power it seems absolutely certain that their close oopiralion must soon reduce the Powers to If j docs tinfinal catastrophe will lr all the more when it connote inevitable threefold There arc Increasing indica tions that all the Central Ausli Bulgaria und casting about for of bringing the war to an They know by this time that then is not the slightest chance of breakup of the Allied combination ijiititist While the Allies are noi likely to make a separate peace any of the nations on the other the fact that it is open to them so may be a means of bringing ai pressure to bear on Ormany to ask for peace with an honest offer of reasonable Meanwhile the fighting tiitist go In such a war there can 1 no provisional cessation of hostil Against a foe BO efficient as the German armies in France and Belgium there must maintained an increasingly vigorous and sustained series of Sooner or later the vholfi combination must break and the harder the pressure the Miorter will be the interval of sus pense and A German Miscalculation Morale Is the Factor of Chief Value in War Morale is such an allimportant factor in the war that it seems that a scientific people like the Germans did not take more ac count of That they did calculate upon it to some is tut their point of view misled them in their Many careless readers confuse the two mor al and even in and while there is undoubtedly a connection between the it is of a subjective nature which the Ger mans appear to have left out of ac The dictionary defines mor ale as state of with reference to and the especially of a number of pet sons associated in some dangerous as soldiers in It is that the idea ex tends to a nation as well as an and that national courage and zeal form a most important ele ment in such a struggle as the world This is where the miscalcula tion of the Germans comes Their morale rested on a material So so much so many gnus and so much muni tions of in these and con Such appears to be the Ger man Germany never seems to have learned that human nature or that it may attain some sublimation or admixture with high er elements that change its quality and power of They that nickel gives a new quality to steel when mingled with it in a pro portion of about three per never realized that there might be some nickel admixture in the steel of character which would create an en tiicly new power of The democratic spirit is the nickel in the steel of human In Germany there is no real no real and therefore no real Only the Kaiser can depend upon only the Kaiser can represent and other men must depend upon the Kaiser and the Kaisers arrangements and pre When these fail all In French and British democracies and in the Russian pat riarchate every man learns to de pend upon God himself and on his own the unconquerable morale of a true Contentment in India Large Portion of the Country la Not Under British Administration The notion prevails in the United States that all India belongs to British and is administered by says Saint Nihol Singh in a recent This is an utterly erroneous A very large and populous portion of the peninsula in the possession of its own uid is ruled by with little or no interference from the I have coined the term Indian India to differentiate be tween the India belonging to Indians and that in the possession of the Indian with its area of square almost onethird as large as continental United Its is a little more than fourfifths that of this Po British India is It is divided into three presidencies and twelve which arc un der the supreme government of In presided over by the Viceroy and who under the Secretary of State for India a member of the British In dian on the is not one political During recent years 1 have had privilege of coming in close con tact with several Indians who rule their own right and and I have watched their public and pri vate Without a single excep I have found the Indian rulers to be men of great administrative capacity and all de voted to the welfare of their sub jects and interested in all sorts of reform Not many pub lic serVants or business men in America or elsewhere work so hard as do these Indian Austrian Balderdash How1 Strange Is the Austrian Idea of State The Vienna Arbcitcr or gan of the Austrian quotes the followingpassage from the the organ of the court as a typical example of the condensed balderdash characteristic of this paper In all that concerns the spirit of public the justice and righteousness of the government of the the sanity of the constitu tion and its policy during the we in Austria are incomparably su perior to our How grandly stands the constitution of Austria Hungary beside the constitutions of States like France and where the leaders of the nation are condemned to be mere mouthpieces for Austria declared war on Serbia because our splendid heir to the throne had been and be cause it was necessary to root out the nests of the How absolutely moral was such a motive for war How grand the Austrian idea of State 1 The British and American Navies relations between the British Tind American navies have Always been not only in the of the cor In producing Mahan the Amer ican navy has put ours under a spec ial Mahan may said to have discovered for us the real secret of Nelsons and the true meaning of the great deeds of our other naval Both navies today are thus the heirs to the same and You say that Miss Oldstyle is suffering from severe mental shock What caused it shei been claiming that shes only twentyeight years old and then somebody found her name In one of those Ago columns in the Huns Grossly Deceived Women Most Gullible of Writes Northcliffes Man Writing of middle class Thomas Curtin said While there are an increasing number of doubters among the German man kind as to the accuracy of state ments issued by the in the class with which I mostly came into contact in Germany the women are blindfolded and believe all they are So is the in fluence of government propaganda on the people of Germany that in a town where I met two English ladies married to Germans they believed that Germany had Verdun In her had annihilated the English tioops mainly black on the Spmme had defeated the English fleet in the battle Skagerack and reduced greater part of the forti and munition fac tories of London to ruins by Zeppe Their anguish for the fate of their English relations was and they were intensely hopeful that England would accept any sort of terms of peace in order to prevent the invasions which some people in Germany still believe War Is a Great Unifier War is a great educator and a great It has modified and chastened all our It has left us not Free Traders and Tariff and but These old divi sions of opinion which once signified much have now dwindled to their true What is at stak is seen to be nothing less than the existence and survival of the British In the light of the great danger and the great when some sacrificing their oth er a are prepared to sacrifice their And we say all honor io such strange as it may opinions are to some more val uable than the London Morning Honesty or Pride Whats the little Two boys were and I got struck with a Thats it the innocent bystander always gets hurt Bnt I dont know as I was an in nocent I was what they was fight in I Placard the Set Forth the True Conditions i Much as heard few months shortly after the appointment ot llerr liatorki as food of notorious placard hich was printed and rjmilatcd by among the mavsis of the Germvinj working and aiming the diirs This placard clearly j written by popular wished to tin masses where tluy ere luiug led by cliques in and called on tin in j to rise in protest Infore it was too Its suppression was vigorously sought by the Am sterdam correspondent of the Daily j Chronicle reports in sending the full The following extracts from it What was bound to happen has At Mer and many other places disturbances among the hungry masses have oc curred in front of the food Our Slatcofsicgegovcrnmcnt only answers with State of police military ollweg accuses ling land of the crime of causing hunger in and out1 men and other government supporters bablo it after But the govern ment ought to have known that things would happen War against France and Tjigland must needs lead to the cutting off of War makers Wicked ene mies have done it on But the only counterquestion Why have you followed the encircling policy The German government followed imperialistic policy which upset all Germany came into con flict with and finally united the Austrian Slantska davcr and with hopelessly bankrupt Turkey and brought about the world On this crime was for this government did nothing to meet star Why was nothing done lie cause war does not hurt the gov ernment jun food but enriches If from the outset of the struggle against hunger and misery serious measures had been then the blinded masses would haverecogniz ed the seriousness of the and the clamour for war would have The people have been intoxicated for this reason with howling about at the same time being handed over to the capi talistic food The ruling classes did not want to give up their mad lust for annexa and lied to the people by tell ing them that if they held out Ger many would dictate peace and domi nate the They have lied to They said the German submarines will cut off Englands and England will be made to crave for and thus the war be These are only fairy tales for child The submarine warfare will bring more enemies on our but there no possibility of cutting off Englands now or even if Germany had ten times as many submarines as she actually Then it has been dangled before cur eyes that the offensive against the Balkans would give us more breathing space and Abundant food would come from This was a deliberate for the Turkish government cannot feed its own army any And now they would console us by pointing to the next All suffering will end whenthe new crop is they This also is a deliberate Now there is nothing The occupied territories have been crop ped There is no longer enough to distribute to satisfy peoples hun What of the future The war can be carried on for another six and perhaps for a whole while the people will be left to a slow death from how our future generation will be and to the terrible sacri fices of dead and mutilated on thp battlefields will be added the further sacrifices of women and children who will fall victims to diseases owing to An Overseas Institute Foster Interests at Home and Abroad of Couh trymcn Overseas In addition to ilu iui it ihcic1 How arc tlusf of the Ui he strengthened in their IK allegiance to the Father This is llifprobrVm which is forced by I he fciuuK s of i mule and Museum in tin inter is 01 overseas Germans al Slnlt under the patronage of cm the King of and principal shippers and VALUE OF THE HOME TOWN TO ITS ADJACENT FARMING COMMUNITY land 1en ARClJMENI lRONf BASIS OF CUNTS the war there ud will be trcmcn Germany may to Building Up the Town Adds Dollars to the Value of tl Land Fixed Investments and Means Social iind Hdncational Advantages 1C I Uie your land to a reasonably look forward in linn an almost of Ivr overseas No time iniift be lost in arranging for the sary supply of all available raw ma terials equally urgent is the ques Umi of an extension of markets for The cordial cooperation of the overseas iJerman i1 absolutely These and similar thoughts occupy he founders of an institute which is to supply a knowledge of overseas Germans and their conditions of life to the nation at to further their interests at home and and to awaken an intelligent interest among the masses of the people in the concerns of those colonies of German men who are our advanced guard The museum is not to c a cabinet of Among all the various objects exhibited there is to be i living Overseas Germany is to be shown in the midst of her surroundings and in her dealings with native peoples and In this way the imperial German IW familiar with countries in which is becoming vitally Some interesting details regarding it nature of the collections arc given in an article contributed by Carl Uhlig to Berliner Tuge They are to embrace the in tellectual and material possessions of the overseas in addi much that is important in the in which his life is The German dornestie and its clothing utensils of all the produce of arts and objects of means of transport and and all that fitly il lustrates or explains the ar religious and social institutions of the country are all to be exhibit Each country where Germans are standing at the mi I posts of our worldmission will have its own special But this is not There will be an important department devoted to Germau shippinglines trading foreign countries where Germans are another will illustrate the German press in those and a third will be devoted to exhibits bearing on overseas German attention will be giveij to displaying processes of manufacture froin the raw material to the finished article of variouscommodities in which Germany is largely and which are produced by such as cotton and Finally there will be the Institute and Museum which has been planned on a vast and veiy Much shelfroom will be given to books on economic but other subjects will not be It will be the aim of the founders to makrj the library a complete fountain of knowledge re garding those foreign countries which come within the orbit of our economic and cultural worldmis the more money it takes to buy We all know About the tiling the owner tries to do when you dicker for a piece of is to justify the high price you are asking by pointing out how close the land to and the good roads lead ing to lie knows this is the most appealing argument close tu can put ow tt and adjoining good roads is not desirable be to have must have good stores there uo other way to make iland to have good anej od vou iHiisi give them a chance to tlirhe and Vou must them You do not abuse out because Mich treatment dors not and tin same personal in terest is at stake in community Vou must consider the mer chants of your town as a community Tommy and the Soldier Stationed in Egypt Bewails the Conditions Sergeant of the Lanca stationed somewhere in bewails a number of evils in that theatre of There is too much daylight It strikes you when you look or or The new helmet worn by us is certainly a protector apainst the rays of the but as no one has invented a plan for turning a cavity in the helmet into an ice storage we must endure the I cannot say that I am charmed with the mirages one sees At first they were but when I saw the other day a huge army gal loping toward with clouds of white snow belynd them I felt as if were being Vbat we enjoy out here is The monotcny of the desert may please men like Hall but with us boys who left home to smash up the power of the Turk we have no use for anything that does not end hi It smokes here there is something Didnt Her That dame asked me for some consummated said the grocers new boy with You correct did you asked the nix Im onto me job better clan I jest handed her a can of consecrated lye ansaid Exchange It might be well while you are cor recting your disobedient offspring to remember that you did not die Gerard in Berlin Hated by Germans for His Sympathy With British Prisoners The plain talk by exminister to in N York about the treatment given prisoners by the ismerely a repetition of what he said the authorities in His unpopular ity in Berlin because of his refusal to keep his eyes shut to conditions was A correspondent of an English writing after escap ing from the German said ot Ambassador Gerard Of the neutral ambassadors that I met in Berlin the only one win Bccmed to me to have any outstand ing personality was the American who sharcc Lloyd George the reputa tionof being the best hated man in the At the VVilhelmstrasse lie positively detested because of his outspoken remarks about the dis graceful condition prisoner camps in of the British am causo crops can be marketed lluj investment in which you are both in least trouble and but there directly and directly Vou other social and economical adare a as it in vour outages as and the bftter yon your home the better your in vestment will Vou cant make your home U Consider the cold matter o 11 town is worth to the people own ing land in the measured irom a dollars and cents Johnson of the Missouri Agricultural Station made a careful investigation of 650 farms and he proved by actual figures what a lot of us have known in a i general way for a long For in the locality inves the 7V farms within two miles of town had an average value of per acre as compared with per acre for the 1SJ farms from two to four miles from town per acre for the 126 farms four to six miles from town for the 113 farms to eight miles from and for the 149 farms over eight miles from Johnson says that the most rapid decrease in value occurred in the first six after which the difference of a mile or two from town made less relative In another he points out that 42 farms valued at or more per had an average of about two and onehalf miles to mar ket 62 in the group had nearly three and the 275 in the group five miles to 246 in the group averaged six and one fourth miles to town These figures are Listen to this In one locality a farm of 160 acres two and onehalf miles from town had a market value of while the same kind of farm located six and onefourth miles from town was only worth And if you told man who owned the first farm that his home town was actually worth in dollars and cents to he would probably spend a good deal of lining ito show you that he would be off without the town at We have gotten so in the ha bit of lambasting our home most of the time for some petty po litical that we frequently re fuse to sec the truth when it is plac ed before us in actual Just the when we get off by overcome our jealousies and temporarily forget about the town man that we have it in then we really have to admit that the home town is far and away the most valuable asset to every many woman and child in the This leads us a step Once ve commence we no sooner have one of them answer ed than we ask Our first question was Whats the good of the home town and we answered it by saying among other it really donated to one man and like to every other man owning land in the And now we ask the second ques What makes a valu able home town We might dodge the question by Lots of if we arc we will get close to the truth by say The because with out the merchants there would be no It is just as impossible to have a town without merchants as it is to have a lake without The mer chants make the town just as the water makes the Of better unless you arc on the it and give the business there the proper chance for a normal and legitimate Remember the story of the farmer who was so selfish and shortsighted that tried to make money by stunting his When he finally sold the he found that he had paid a mighty big price for the feed he had Jusl how many of us have driver into town with any thought of what our loss would be if that town wcrr wiped out entirely and never replac ed How many of us have consider d that the town really meant any thing to us except for a little wild on our part at times How nany of us have considered that the ucrchants of the town were conferr ng upon and upon all f the advantages worth ill dollars and cents immeasurably more than any vrofits they got out Of US If we woke up some morning and iouud that five thousand worth of uninsured buildings dad up in smoke during the we wouldnt need anybody to the loss was going us Still your home town ma mean even more than that to you but nobody has been thinking much along that line until A good and good roads leading to are going to be two live from now And dont forget that is quite often measured How long docs it lake to go to town is a more common ques tion flow far is it farm on a good one that fan be Used with speed and comfort day in the is nearer to from a practical standpoint at six niilcs than another is at on a rotten other things have to but the fact also because of his repeated warn ings to the German government as to the grave effect on German American diplomatic relations tha would be caused by resumption o unlimited There was much talk of a plot to murder and 1 recall the great excitement which j prevailed when he was the object of a rude demonstration at the Eight Times Zero An Irishman went into a jewelers Bhop to buy a The showed him for Murdherl TCI dollars for that bit of a clock Is there anything wonderful about it said the that is an eightday And whats that asked the pros pective it goes eight days without So much as said the Irish scratching his theres wan thing Id like to be after asking If it goes eight days without winding how for the sake of will it go if ye wind it you think we should have a more elastic currency elastic Why dont they make it nigre adhesive be that without you would have no town and the better the mercantile estab the better the we move along to the third How is the home town to have good merchants Dear there is no secret about it at Good stores in your home town are the result of They have to be encouraged and maintain You have to get them just like you mature superior horses and by treating them fairly and giving them a chance to In the language of the You cant play a lone hand in your com munity and get away with it very and the business game is just the If the town is to help you you must help the and the beauty of it by benefiting the youvalways and invariably benefit yourself These benefits arc direct and in Building up the town adds dollars to the value of your land aiu other fixed That point is Nobody seriously disputes It means greater social and edu cational benefits tha cannot be measured by dollars am but while apparently indirect they are direct again in the sense that they to the value of your fixed because these arc among the desirable things foi which people generally arc willing to pay In summing as the lawyer sifting out all the evidence am considering a few pertinent facts you first want a good home town and you want it as near to you as you wan good roads leading to An American Tribute Caspar Whitney in the New York Evening Post Englands conduct towards her German residents and her German prisoners and the German dead shot down from those assassins of the the and delivered up by those assassins of the the U has provided an exhibition of broadmindedness and of the sporting spirit such as the world has not be fore To observe the col lective Englishman at work in his town or on the march or on the fir ingline is to impel you to take ofl your hat to Those Americans who now seize upon every pretest to take a fling at England will be thauking God before the German beast is beaten into compliance with decency that England is and that the spirit to uphold national honor and to fight for human still rules at least in the land of cnr Pilgrim CoOperative Wool Marketing Saskatchewan Department of Api culture AssiHting the Farmers The Cooperative Organization branch of the Saskatchewan Depart ment of Agriculture will again con duct a cooperative wool gathering project in In a circular mailed to all the sheep owners in Saskatche wan attention is drawn to the fact that this which was first un dertaken in when 180 sheep men marketed pounds of wool through the branch for an average price of 17 34 cents per grown from year to year until in 487 consignments aggregating 890 pounds was realizing au average price of 3213 cents per All sheep men in the province are invited to take advantage of the departments marketing facilities dur ing the 1917 An advance payment at the rate of 20 cents per pound will be forward ed producers as soon as the wool is and when it has been sold ji final payment will be return ing the entire proceeds realized from the sale of the less the actual cost of storage and handling No charge whatever made for the marketing rendered by the will Manitobas Firet Gold The first carload of goldbearing quartz ever shipped from the pro vince of Manitoba was sent to be smelted at It was min ed at Herb near La in Northern So you have taken to carrying n round a1 monkey This is going too you never go was his wifes somewhaj ambiguous   

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