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Lethbridge Herald Newspaper Archive: October 01, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Lethbridge Herald

Location: Lethbridge, Alberta

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   Lethbridge Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 1, 1954, Lethbridge, Alberta                                The Store ior Boys and Girls Your Baby's Clothing Needs OUR SPECIALTY CREAMO Second Section Lethbridpe, Alberta, Friday, October 1, 1054 Papes 9 to 20 For Cereals and For Coffee Too Only 2d Creamo Is For You! Now, If Only He Could Run! Backed by Eisenhower Name Idaho Governor New 1JC Head for U.S. Governor Len Jordan of Idaho will become chairman ol the United States section of the International Joint Commission next Januarv 1, succeeding ex-Senator A. O. Stan- ley of Kentucky on the commis- sion, which .sits as .in internation- al tribunal over all border disputes between Canada and the United States. One such dispute still before the commission after many and one in which Southern Alberta is vitally interested is that over the division of waters in the Waterton and Belly Rivers. General A. G. L. McNauchton of Ottawa is the chairman of the Canadian section. The present hvad of the United States section of the commission has always been an ardent Demo- crat and after serving as governor of Kr.ntuckv he was elected to the United States senate. NOT OFFICIAL YET Governor Jordan is a well-known Republican. While his new ap- pointment has not jet been offici- allv announced from Washington, D.C., it was revealed recently bv both President Eisenhower and Secretary of the Interior Douglas McKay when the two visited the state of Washington for the opening of the McNary dam. At that time Mr. McKay voiced confidence in Spokane in the abili- ty of Governor Jordan to nego- tiate a treaty or compact with Canada which will smooth out problems of storage on the Colum- bia river and hasten the building of the Libbv dam in Montana. Photo; Herald Engraving. Mat lie Cleveland Indians ouclit In draft thlt character for the World Series! Spud Murphy, wen above with one of his fans, lirrtha Kenny, of Lrthhridce. Is a home-RTown product, anil Owner Jran dolls of the city supplied the Cleveland uniform when the Indians battled their wav to the (np of the American League. Spud came complete with rtes, cap and arms, and even a baseball in his shirt pocket; Golis just supplied the finishing touches. He should make an excellent first-sacker for the Potato Hrlt League! Installation New Lights Completed The cltv electrical department has completed the installation of mod- ern street lights on 3rd Ave. S. be- tween 8th and 10th St. S. The new mercury vapor lamps are part of the modernizing program which saw the two blocks of 3rd Ave. widened and paved to trans- form them into a modern business area. More blocks will probably be mod- ernized along the avenue next year. OWMAN ACE Ml The Greatest Washer Made CONNOR THERMO ELECTRIC Q Patented (hcrmn tub keeps the water hnt throughout the entire trashing Q Beautiful gleaming white finish. Q 4-Vcar guarantee. TRADES TERMS Wilson Electric Supplies Limited 7lb St. S. Phone 3908 Skating Club Starts Drive For Members Directors of the Lethbridge Figure Skating Club chose Nov. 1 as the opening date for their 1954-55 season of activities at their opening meeting held Thursday night. This jear the club will have two instructors for classes, and mem- bership is expected to exceed 150. Mrs. Helen Little and Mrs. Phyllis McNally have been chosen to head the classes, which will range from those for tiny tots to adult sessions. Fees for the coming year will re- main the same as last year and already the membership drive is in full swing. During the year both the ice sheet at the Civic Ice Centre and the one at the Arena will be utilized by the club. Anjone wishing to join the club is cordially invited, whether as a beginner, novice or expert. GUEST RANCH IS POPULAR ATTRACTION Mr. McKay was further quoted as say I "I am of the opinion that storage of water in Canada will be made available to for wc must real- ue that the Canadians have an equity in the Columbia rixer, just as have the states of Washington and Oregon." PRESIDENTS STATEMENT And at the opening of the Mc- Nary dam in Washington state. President Eisenhower stated: "I hope that we shall soon have another example of federal re- sponsibility in the generation of power. I refer to the Libbv dam. which like this great McNary a project requiring the resources of the federal govern- ment. From its strategic loca- tion on the Canadian border, on a tributary of this mighty Colum- bia river, it will powerfully aid the control of floods, and produce a new means of generating power, all the way to the sea. "I have recently acted to remove obstacles to the construction of that dam. A new site has been selected. A distinguished north- westerner. Governor Jordan of Idaho, has been named chairman of the international Joint commis- sion. His intimate knowledge of this area and sound Judgement will surely go far to speed fulfillment of our aims, and those of our Cana- dian neighbors, to bring this pro- ject into existence. I shall continue to recommend federal construction of such beneficial projects. New ones will be started." _ w One of Lethbridqe's popular play spots, the new Fort Whoop-Up Guest Ranch, is seen in the aerial photo above. Stock car racing was in iull swing when the picture was taken and a large crowd can be seen in cars at right fore- ground, watching the racers. Cars in the race can be seen rounding the curve in the foreground. At left, centre, is tha outdoor dance floor and theatre at the guest ranch. Photo; Herald Encravtng. Eleven-Point Platform Listed By Lethbridge Citizens' Assn. Random CHEJ3 CASUAL Vaccination Can Save Disease Care The Lethliridce As- sociation, which this jear Is sponsnrinc Mrs. Eleanor U'oitte as Its candidate fnr alderman In the Oct. 13 ciric flections, has announced Its campaign committees and 11-polnt plat- form for the election. Campaign manager for Mrs. I Woitte will be Mrs. E. S. Vaselenak, while on the finance committee will be Mrs. Joseph Shandro as chair- man. Mrs. James Walker, Mrs. Steven Leonard and Mrs. Alice Meek. Mrs. A. M. Peters is chanman of the publicity committee. Mrs. Lila McKenzie is m charge of radio pub- iJail Youth in Gas Theft Case Stanley Donald Moore, 21. of Edmonton was sentenced to six months in Jail and his brother, j Charles Moore, 13, of Edmonton, i received a two-year suspended sen- trnce when thev appeared In city i police court on theft charges Wed- i nesday. The two men were arrested while trying to steal ga? from Fogel and Kuschcl Transport Co. here last Both pleaded guilty to the charge. Agriculturist Given Post At Sedgewick MEECH, MITCHELL, ROBINS AND ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS LETIinitlUUE ALBERTA licitv and Mrs. Mary Waters is In charge of press publicity. Aid. Lil- lian Parry will act in an advisory capacity to the candidate. LIST PLATFORM Mrs. Woltte's platform promises: 1. To encourage the greatest prog- ress with practical and economical keep taxes at the lowest possible level and to spend available funds in the interest of all. 2. To give wholehearted support to the establishment of Industry. 3. To do her utmost to secure greater grants from senior govern- ments towards education, hospitals and health welfare. 4. To endeavor to promote better lighting throughout the city. 5. To put forth every effort to expand the existing program for the elimination of the dust nuisance. 6. To endeavor to bring about a more adequate collection and dis- posal of city garbage. 7. To do "all in my power" to pro- mote a more active policy regarding social welfare and to continue sup- port and interest in adequate facili- ties for the aged. 8. To put forth every effort to support the reconditioning of the 9th St. bridge. 9. To promote a working agree- ment with surrounding municipali- ties in municipal planning with reference to city boundaries. 10. To support a more active pro- gram towards the beautification of city cemeteries, boulevards, streets and parks. 11. To encourage and work to- wards the improvement of parking and traffic conditions and the fin- ancial deficit in the city transit system. Saturday Special BOAST YOUNG TURKEY With celery dressing, cranborry sauce, butter- ad grocn peas, creamy whipped potatoes with brown gravy. Warm Cloverleai roll and iresh creamy Tea 5c CoHes Photo; Herald Eneravme. A. K. nmvAnns A. E. "Art" Edwards of Leth- bndcr, assistant district agricul- turist here, has been appointed district agriculturist at Scdgcwick, 1 Alberta. i Mr. Edwards came to Lcthbridee in 1053, having been graduated bv the Washington State College. Pull- 1 man, Wash., in 1949 with the de- gree of bachelor of science in agri- culture. Following graduation he worked on his father's farm at Three Hills. >nd later for HIP firm of J. E. Love and Sons of Calgary. Mr. Edwards; is well-known in thcLethbridse area for the work he has done in organizing and as- sisting the many 4H clubs in the area. Mr. Edwards' wifr. Laura, has worked w-ith the Barons-Eureka Health Unit for a Kar as a public nursr, Mr, Edwards experts to leave Lrthbndge for Scdgewick Oct. 4. He is replacing Larry Williams who has been transferred to I hear Someone say That this year Went astray. That we passed up Indian summer' All of a sudden it's here! Never fear Though delay. Moist and drear Came our wav, Indian Summer gilds the Blue is the sky and all's clear. Superintendent District Agriculturist Peter Jam- ison has urged farmers to take precautions now to insure their hrrrts against bovine Bane's disease. The disease takes an estimated toll of from to annually, with Mime individual cat- tlemen losing as much as a through looses to their herds. Mr. Jamieson said the disease, which is present in some of the cat- tle herds in the Lethbndge area, exacts these great losses by caus- ing infected cows to abort at five or fieht months, and reducing milk production. The disease, Mr. Jamieson said, is caiued by germs which spread from one cow to another, principally at the time of abortion. There is also the possibility of humans con- tacting undulant fever by drinking the milk of infected cows, or through cuts on the hands when Alexander Rites Held in City Funeral services were held In Martin Bros. Chapel for Mrs. Anna Alexander. "3. of Picture Butte. i long-time Southern Alberta resi- j dent, who died Thursday in Cal- gary. Rev. Donovan Jones of Picture Butte officiated. Pallbearers were Neil Currie, H. B. Kane, H. N. Hanrv, T. H. Wv man, E. Reynolds, Alex McMillan. Photo: HrraH Engravmc. P. OOLOUBEIT Of Trail, BC. who has brrn ap- pointed Lcthbndcc's new superin- tendent of recreation. He succeeds C. Lome Davidson who resigned from the position this summer. Mr. Goloubcff. who is expected to v- ilve In the city this month, is cur- rently athletic director for the Trail Athletic Association. handling Bang's Infected cattle, es- pecially at calving time. There is no known cure, Mr. Jamieson said, ns a cow infected with Bang s disease usually carries the abortion germs the rest of her life. Prevention can be obtained only bv vaccinating heifer calves at MX to nine months of ace. or olaer. at the discretion of the veter- inarian. This builds up a cood disiase- free herd in five to six vears. These can be exported, Mr. Jamieson added, to the United States up to 22 months after vaccination with- out blood test. Vaccine is supplied through the Alberta department of agriculture, but as the vaccine must be hand- led with care, it can only be admin- bv veterinarians who will Identify the calves with an ear tag and issue a certificate. It h of the utmost importance, Mr. Jamicson Hope for Heavy South Entries In Toronto and Chicago Fairs said, fo have Bang's disease free herds to prevent cases of undulant fever, and calf losses. Buyers are looking for vaccinated cattle; thus, they are worth more money, he added. "We offer farmers a vaccination program; the nearest veterinarian will undertake to vaccinate heifer calves for per head for the 10, and 40 cents per head thereafter, which is the rate agreed upon by the Western Stock Grow- ers' Association. "However, a veterinarian cannot be expected to make a 50-mile trip to vaccinate two calves. Therefore, farmer should interest their neigh- bors and eel applications In to save mileage. "Every cattle owner in the dis- trict is urged to co-operate in the program, by sending In his application before Oct. 20 so that his calves will not be missed when his veterinarian is in the- district." Mr. Jamieson declared. Farmers should not xvalt until they had abortinc cows and heavy losjcs. They should start now and build up Bang's resistant herds, Mr. Jamieson said. Southern Alberta fanners should now be giving consideration to showing samples of grains, legumes and grasses, as well as potatoes and special crops, at the Toronto Royal Winter Fair and the Chicago-Fair, Diitrict Acriculturist Peter Jamie- said Friday. Harvest Hoedown Here Saturday Western dancr lovers will have n chance to stretch their legs and rio-si-do this Saturday night as the School of Western Dancing, under the direction of Johnny and Qu'Appellc Gibbons, presents its I annual Harvest Hoedown in the I Sports Centre. I Everyone is invited to the hi; affair, which will take place amid cnv harvest decorations. The dance bccm at ,K AS Twenty Lethbridge men were listed In a recent Canada Gwct'e as being eligible for positions us carriers in the citv. They are William Winter. Stanley Car- mkhael, Eurene Wallace Lcishman, Melvln Platz, Earl Slrn- beck, Robert Brown, Frank Millrr. Ronald Roy Wing. Alrx- antlcr Koshman, Michael Swizui- Alfred Simpkin, Howard Yan- Sidney Slater, Mltchrll Srtaba. John Cranlcy, Martin Swizinski, Prtdrrlfk Kuchtran and Grnr Leonard. Coalhurst Infant Buried Thursday services wrre held Wed- nesday for Gary Sornen, infant .son of Mr. and Mrs. Jercmt.Mi Socnrn of Coalhurst. Services were conducted by Father Lebel in the Chnstcnscn Bros, chaprl here with interment follow- ing In St. Patrick's Cemetery. Meetings A meeting of Wlldey Junior Lodge No 1 will be held Saturday. Oct. 2 at 7.30 p m. in the Odd Fellows Hall. Sr. Br. Upton, DDGM, will be prcs- rnt to instal the new officers A lull attendance is required. Senior members welcome. f' This week Last jfar LENNOX OIL PROPANE FURNACES CHARLTON HILL, LTD. COR 13th St. S. riinne f.IGG H. W. BROWN CO. Land Surveyors and Engineers 3rd Are. S., LETHBRinGE Phone 6211 "It is very important this year when so much of Western Canada has suffered poor crops and harvest, that Southern Alberta make every effort to get samples entered in these Mr. Jamieson faid. "Tlie best grain area in Western Canada this year is right here." Every encouragement Is given by the Alberta government to exhibi- tors by aiding in getting the samples down to Toronto, having a repre- sentative on the spot to look after samples, and also by increasing prize money awards, and giving extra prizes, he noted. he added, "all this is of no avail if exhibitors do not have their samples entered before the deadlines." Entry forms must be mailed be- fore Oct. 16, Mr. Jamieson stated. "Entrants can work on their samples after that, but can't enter the competitions at the last he warned. Entry forms and fres for the To- ronto show should he sent to the General Manager, Rival AgricuU tural Winter Fair. Exhibition Park, Toronto, prior to Oct. 16. All provincial district agricultur- its' offices have entry forms and will help entrants fill them out. NEED Ext'a copies of vour valuable papers, birth etc. Our photostat service is not ex- pensive. 1215 3rd Ave. S., Phone 63II LETHBRIDGE BLUEPRINTING CO. 1948 PACKARD CONVERTIBLE and In perfect shape. Will sacrifice Priced to soil and Fully Guaranteed UNITED SERVICE GARAGE PARTS AND SALES Corner 3rd Ate. and SnitVtCn CALLS 71105 3rd St. Snuth 2750 Hunters The Handiest Place In Town To Get Your LICENSE and SUPPLIES HARDWARI COMPAM1 PLUM BllUr C. COmACimSfi MERCHANTS FAST, EFFICIENT SERVICE 910 3rd S. Phono 3014 the little things that are frequently overlooked surh as making an appointment toaay nt the A. E. CHO33 STUDIO for the FALL PORTRAIT SPECIAL It will take but a moment to give us a call Will sou do It tomorrow? THANKS A LOT! Phone :673 JUST RECEIVED ANOTHER LARGE SHIPMENT OF OUR WOMEN'S CORRECTIVE OXFORDS THE VERY POPULAR MODERN CORRECTIVE By DR. NILSSON Fittings In AA. B. C, D, EE and EEE, In black Idd only 711) 3rd Arc. 8. "The Kiadics' Photographer' 403 5th SL S, Phone 3050 SHOES "Third Dimenson Beauty" ol 516 4lh Avo. S. Phone 3288   

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